2019-2020 Course Listing

Course Code Course Information Credits

AC3200RU

Principles of Accounting I

OCICU course taught at Regis University.

Pre-requisites

Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    AC6190RU

    Forensic Accounting

    OCICU course taught at Regis University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    ACC201SNH

    Financial Accounting

    OCICU course taught at Southern New Hampshire University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    ACC202SNH

    Managerial Accounting

    OCICU course taught at Southern New Hampshire University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    ACC301SLU

    Intermediate Accounting I

    OCICU course taught at Saint Leo University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    ACC302SLU

    Intermediate Accounting II

    OCICU course taught at Saint Leo University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    ACC303SLU

    Accounting Information Systems

    OCICU course taught at Saint Leo University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    ACC331SLU

    Cost Accounting

    OCICU course taught at Saint Leo University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    ACC540SLU

    Accounting Theory

    OCICU course taught at Saint Leo University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    ACT222

    Financial Accounting Principles I

    This course represents an introduction to accounting principles including the accounting process, double-entry bookkeeping, adjusting entries, and the preparation of financial statements. The objectives of this course are to make students aware of the importance of accounting information in every type of organization (private business, not-for-profit, and governmental).

    3

    ACT223

    Managerial Accounting Principles

    This course represents an introduction to managerial accounting concepts, including cost allocation and measurement, cost/volume profit analysis, budgeting, variance analysis, job and process costing, and capital budgeting.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ACT222 Financial Accounting Principles I
  • 3

    ACT322

    Intermediate Accounting I

    This course engages the student in a comprehensive study of generally accepted accounting principles as they relate to the measurement and reporting of assets and income. Students will examine the nature, composition, valuation, and classification of balance sheet items.

    3

    ACT323

    Intermediate Accounting II

    This course is a comprehensive study of generally accepted accounting principles as they relate to the measurement and reporting of various liability and equity accounts. Students examine the nature, composition, valuation, and classification of these accounts as well as important financial reporting concepts, proper financial statement presentation, and related disclosures.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ACT322 Intermediate Accounting I
  • 3

    ACT324

    Individual Tax Accounting

    The primary emphasis of the course is on the income taxation of individuals, but the course also includes an overview of the federal taxation of other forms of business organization (e.g., corporations, partnerships). The focus of the course is on developing knowledge of tax law and its application.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ACT222 Financial Accounting Principles I
  • 3

    ACT412

    Auditing

    The course engages the student in a study of auditing objectives, standards, and procedures employed in the examination of business enterprises and verification of their financial statements. Topics include an evaluation of internal control, preparation of work papers, report writing, professional ethics, and current auditing trends.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ACT323 Intermediate Accounting II
  • 3

    ACT425

    Cost Analysis

    Cost Analysis introduces students to the role cost considerations play in management decision making. Topics include the classification and allocation of costs, job order and process costing, standard costs, budgeting and planning, cost-volume-profit analysis, and using costs as performance measurements.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ACT223 Managerial Accounting Principles
  • 3

    ACT480

    Accounting Information Systems

    This course examines critical business processes and IT audits through theories of Accounting Information Systems (AIS) and using auditing tools and enterprise systems. Case analyses and project assignments nurture professional competence in communicating objectives and procedures through systems documentation techniques, systems analysis and design methodologies, and information processing.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ACT222 Financial Accounting Principles I
  • 3

    ACT490

    Integrative Capstone

    The integrative capstone, undertaken by the student during the senior year, is an extended project that helps the student complete their transition from an undergraduate student to a world-ready professional. The study usually centers on the student's major and may be conducted, at least in part, in the context of a group experience. Such programs are crafted to meet the unique needs of each major, and could include, for example, fieldwork, theater production, creative work in the arts, independent research, or independent readings. The integrative capstone in an interdisciplinary major must have the approval of both academic programs.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • BUS310W Business Analytics: Research Methods
  • BUS312W Marketing Research
  • 3

    ACT498

    Tutorial: Accounting

    Tutorial: Accounting

    4

    ACT499

    Tutorial: Accounting

    Tutorial: Accounting

    4

    ACT510

    Accounting Fundamentals

    An accelerated study of accounting and financial management issues and techniques to provide insight into the financial performance of organizations. The course is a comprehensive study of the preparation, interpretation, analysis, and use of accounting statements and financial information.

    3

    ACT512

    Auditing

    This course engages the student in a comprehensive study of auditing objectives, standards, and procedures employed in the examination of business enterprises and verification of their financial statements. Topics include an evaluation of internal control, preparation of work papers, report writing, professional ethics, and current auditing trends.

    3

    ACT519

    Intermediate Accounting I

    A comprehensive study of generally accepted accounting principles as they relate to the measurement and reporting of assets and income. Students examine the nature, composition, valuation, and classification of balance sheet items.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ACT510 Accounting Fundamentals
  • 3

    ACT523

    Intermediate Accounting II

    This course continues from Intermediate Accounting I with the application of generally accepted accounting principles to liability and equity accounts including accounting for intangibles, bonds, debts and loans, partnerships, corporations, and analysis of working capital.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ACT519 Intermediate Accounting I
  • 3

    ACT524

    Federal Tax Accounting

    The focus of the course is on developing knowledge of tax law and its applications. The primary emphasis of the course is on the income taxation of individuals, but the course also includes an overview of the federal taxation of other forms of business organizations (e.g. corporations, partnerships).

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ACT510 Accounting Fundamentals
  • 3

    ACT540

    Government and Non-Profit Accounting

    This course's focus is upon the principles of fund accounting and the financial reporting, budgeting and auditing of both public and private not-for-profit organizations. Particular attention is given to accounting procedures for the activities of state and local governments, but the course also considers other not-for-profit entities.

    3

    ACT545

    Accounting Theory

    This course encourages students to take a conceptual view of accounting, urging them to get beyond the process and to grasp the reasoning behind the accounting procedures. The focus is upon what it means for accounting to be a source of information and providing a framework for evaluating accounting alternatives.

    3

    ACT573

    Business Law and Ethics

    This course provides students with a broad-based understanding of legal issues that affect modern businesses. The course covers the following substantive law areas: Choice of Entity, Corporate Governance, Raising Money, Securities Regulation, Bankruptcy, Contracts, Intellectual Property and Employment Law.

    3

    ACT580

    Accounting Information Systems

    This course examines critical business processes and IT audits through theories of Accounting Information Systems (AIS) and using auditing tools and enterprise systems. Case analyses and project assignments nurture professional competence in communicating objectives and procedures through systems documentation techniques, systems analysis and design methodologies, and information processing.

    3

    ACT620

    Advanced Financial Accounting

    This course introduces the student to many advanced financial accounting issues. Includes the application of GAAP rules for consolidation of inter-corporate acquisitions and investments in other entities, multi-national accounting issues involving foreign currency transactions and translation of foreign entity statements, accounting for partnerships, and segment and interim reporting requirements.

    3

    ACT625

    Cost Analysis

    Cost Analysis introduces students to the role cost considerations play in management decision making. Topics include the classification and allocation of costs, job order and process costing, standard costs, budgeting and planning, cost-volume-profit analysis, and using costs as performance measurements.

    3

    ACT630

    Advanced Tax Accounting

    This course is designed to introduce students to advanced strategies in taxation. The course's focus is upon how tax research is performed and the basic concepts underlying the strategic tax planning. Tax issues associated with new businesses, business operation, growth, expansion, termination, and liquidations and estate planning are examined.

    3

    ACT640

    Government and Not-for-Profit Accounting

    This course's focus is upon the principles of fund accounting and the financial reporting, budgeting and auditing of both public and private not-for-profit organizations. Particular attention is given to accounting procedures for the activities of state and local governments, but the course also considers other not-for-profit entities.

    3

    ACT645

    Accounting Theory

    This course encourages students to take a more conceptual view of accounting, urging them to get beyond the process and to grasp the reasoning behind the accounting procedures. The focus is upon what it means for accounting to be a source of information and providing a framework for evaluating accounting alternatives.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ACT523 Intermediate Accounting II
  • 3

    ACT650

    Managerial Accounting

    This course examines accounting information that is used in managerial decision making within the organization. Focus is on interpretation of financial statements, cost accounting, financial planning and analysis, the development of internal controls, and constructing budgets.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • BUS507 Accounting Essentials
  • ACT510 Accounting Fundamentals
  • 3

    ACT650EX

    Managerial Accounting: Prior Learning

    Managerial Accounting: Prior Learning

    3

    ACT660

    Preparing for the CPA Exam

    This course will familiarize students with the structure and substance of the CPA exam. Students' current level of preparation for the CPA exam will be tested through use of sample CPA exams. Test results will be used to assist students in developing individualized exam preparation plans.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 4 of the following courses:
  • ACT519 Intermediate Accounting I
  • ACT523 Intermediate Accounting II
  • ACT524 Federal Tax Accounting
  • ACT531 Auditing
  • 3

    ACT699

    Forensic Accounting

    Focuses on preventing, detecting, and investigating common types of internal and external fraud. Designed to cultivate advanced understanding methods of analysis of financial crime allegations. Provides the culminating experience of Chatham University's MAcc program. Should be one of the last courses taken in the MAcc Program.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 3 of the following courses:
  • ACT573 Business Law and Ethics
  • ACT620 Advanced Financial Accounting
  • ACT630 Advanced Tax Accounting
  • 3

    ADMN6375UIW

    Strategic Planning and Policy

    OCICU course taught at University of the Incarnate World.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    AFROTC06PIT

    Sophomore Leadership Lab

    PCHE course taught at University of Pittsburgh.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 0

    ANT0780PIT

    Intro to Cultural Anthropology

    PCHE course taught at University of Pittsburgh.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    ART103

    Intro to Visual Culture

    Visual Culture can be understood as the practice of scrutinizing visual items in both elite and popular culture; of determining how and what they mean to a variety of audiences; and of examining how those meanings might slip, change, or be changed according to both context and audience. Students examine a broad range of visual materials - from paintings to films - through the term of study.

    3

    ART111

    Ceramics I

    This studio course provides students with an introduction to ceramic processes and materials. Instruction in beginning wheel-throwing methods augments competency in basic construction and surface application techniques. Projects focus on development of form and surface in ceramics, as well as exposure to historical and contemporary issues specific to the medium. Additional Fee(s): Applied art fee.

    3

    ART114

    Design Studio

    This course is an introduction to the visual grammar of dynamic composition and form. In this studio course the student will study design with an emphasis on gaining an understanding of organizing principles that contribute to visual engaging and visual arrangements.

    3

    ART115

    Painting I

    This course introduces the student to basic principles of painting and two-dimensional thinking and expression. Drawing skills, color theory, stretcher construction, and a general understanding of visual art concepts accompany each assignment. Additional Fee(s): Applied art fee.

    3

    ART117

    Drawing I

    Through various drawing media, this studio course explores the basic principles of creating a work of visual art, including figure studies from the model, studies from nature, and techniques of composition. Additional Fee(s): Applied art fee.

    3

    ART123SLU

    Art Appreciation

    OCICU course taught at Saint Leo University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    ART127

    Printmaking I

    This course is an introduction to the techniques and aesthetics of graphic media, including dry point, engraving, mezzotint, etching, and aquatint. Additional Fee(s): Applied art fee.

    3

    ART129

    The Body: Self/Other in Three Parts

    The Body: Self/Other in Three Parts

    3

    ART131

    History of World Art I: Prehistory to 1400

    This introductory survey focuses on art of the ancient world and the Middle Ages in the West and selected non-Western cultures to 1400 including India, China, and Mesoamerica. It emphasizes the role of art in the formation of a culture, the shifting function of art in different societies and time periods, and the approaches students can use to understand art.

    3

    ART132

    History of World Art II: 1400 to Present

    This introductory survey focuses on Western art from the Renaissance to today and the art of selected non-Western cultures (including Japan, Africa, and Islamic countries) after 1400. It concentrates on the stylistic, technical, and expressive evolution of painting, architecture, and sculpture within specific historical contexts, yet also explores the cross-influences and interaction of non-Western and Western art as defining characteristics of the modern world.

    3

    ART141

    Media Literacy

    This course introduces students to the Macintosh computer interface and related media practices. Students explore digital foundations, media related histories, theoretical frameworks and critical examination of production elements as they discover how computers are radically changing the way image makers create and present their work. Cross listed as COM 141. Additional Fee(s): Course Computing Fee.

    3

    ART142

    Photography I : Black and White Darkroom

    This course is designed to introduce students to black and white darkroom photography. Students build on camera skills while investigating 35mm film fundamentals and wet lab methods. They will study exposure and printing in the black and white darkroom. A range of photographic materials, analog processes, and techniques will be covered. Students will study the photograph as a medium for documentation, representation, and expression. Cross-listed as COM 142. Additional Fee(s): Applied laboratory fee.

    3

    ART150

    Introduction to Digital Video Production

    This course introduces the tools, technology, and techniques of digital video production. Students plan, script, manage, and produce videos using digital technologies. Along with the technical application, students will be exposed to the history of video as an artistic and instructional medium, as well as the relationship of digital video to film and television. The theoretical focus is on critiques of narrative construction. Cross-listed as FDT/COM 150. Additional Fee(s): Applied art fee.

    3

    ART152

    Photography II - Introduction to Digital Photography

    This course introduces students to the basic aesthetic grammar of digital photography and provides a historical and critical context for looking at and making photographs. Students will use their own digital cameras with manually adjustable focus, exposure manipulation, photo finishing techniques and printing processes. They will also learn the fundamentals of digital capture and will utilize Adobe Bridge and Lightroom software for file processing, management, and output. Cross-listed as COM 152. Additional Fee(s): Applied art fee.

    3

    ART205

    Sculpture Studio

    This advanced studio course gives the student the opportunity to study a particular process or combination of processes in more depth. Contemporary approaches such as installation and performance art, and environmental and conceptual art are introduced. Additional Fee(s): Applied art fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ART105 Sculpture I
  • 3

    ART208

    Introduction to Art Museum Studies

    This course introduces students to the themes and issues addressed in the Art Museum Studies program, including an overview of the history and function of art museums, their role in society, the interpretation of objects for museum audiences, and other issues central to the museum profession such as censorship and repatriation.

    3

    ART210

    History of Photography

    This course will examine the relationships between photographs and audiences from the early nineteenth century to the present. A variety of themes will be discussed, including fashion photography, war, fine arts, advertising, portraits, landscapes, and social documentary. Within this structure, we will consider fundamental questions about photography, vision, and meaning, such as finding truth in images and discovering the relationship between image-making and power.

    3

    ART211

    Ceramics Studio

    This studio course advances the student in all technical aspects of ceramics and explores conceptual, critical approaches both to the medium and to specific contemporary issues. Additional Fee(s): Applied art fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ART111 Ceramics I
  • 3

    ART211PLA

    Ceramics Studio

    PLA Credit Awarded

    3

    ART213

    Special Topics

    Special Topics

    3

    ART213WX

    Special Topics: Women and Art

    Special Topics: Women and Art

    3

    ART214

    Design Studio

    This course is an introduction to the visual grammar of dynamic composition and form. In this studio course the student will study design with an emphasis on gaining an understanding of organizing principles that contribute to visual engaging and visual arrangements.

    3

    ART215

    Painting Studio

    This advanced course in painting gives the student a broad understanding of technical issues in the context of contemporary conceptual and critical approaches to the medium. Students will have an opportunity to work on independent projects. Additional Fee(s): Applied art fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ART115 Painting I
  • 3

    ART217

    Drawing Studio

    This advanced studio course continues figure studies from the model, as well as landscape drawing and architectural drawing. Conceptual and critical approaches to the medium are emphasized. Additional Fee(s): Applied art fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ART117 Drawing I
  • 3

    ART220

    Material Studies Studio

    Students continue to develop their understanding of three-dimensional materials and processes, their history and practice, and associated conceptual vocabularies in this studio. The course aims to challenge students with ceramic and/or sculptural skills in order to move beyond technique, and reconsider material and process from a variety of perspectives. Studio and research assignments will examine technical and conceptual concerns - prompting students to articulate and contextualize their artistic practice.

    3

    ART226

    3-d Design II:archit

    3-D DESIGN II:ARCHIT

    3

    ART226

    3-d Design II:archit

    3-D DESIGN II:ARCHIT

    1

    ART227

    Printmaking Studio

    This course is an exploration of the expressive possibilities of graphic media. Historical methods of printmaking are introduced. Additional Fee(s): Applied art fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ART127 Printmaking I
  • 3

    ART230W

    Women and Art

    Women and Art addresses the work of women artists from the Renaissance to the present and images of women in Western art. Feminist approaches to the history of art are examined critically to determine their contribution to the history of art. This is a writing intensive course.

    3

    ART231

    Renaissance Art

    This course traces the rise of the humanistic spirit in the art of Italy between 1300 and 1550. Equal emphasis is placed on the achievements of Early Renaissance artists and architects (Ghiberti, Alberti, Donatello, Masaccio, Botticelli), and the masters of the High Renaissance (Leonardo, Raphael, Michelangelo, Bramante, Titian).

    3

    ART234

    Baroque and Rococo Art

    An in-depth survey of the various styles and aims of European art from 1590 to 1700.

    3

    ART241

    Lighting Principles

    This course gives a basic grounding in lighting techniques for both studio and location work and covers the use of available light and various lighting instruments. Students create lighting plans; learn to create dramatic high-key effects of subtly sensitive illumination, and master color balance and metering. Additional Fee(s): Applied art fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • ART273 Photography I
  • COM273 Photography I - B&W Darkroom
  • 3

    ART245

    Design Praxis

    This course introduces the concepts of visual perception. Theories on the 'way we see', how information is interpreted through light and how it includes physiology and cognitive perception. This course also explores the relevance of symbols and archetypes in broadening ones perceptual skills. The aim of this course is broaden and deepen student's visual and verbal skills in critical thinking, the creative process and problem solving.

    3

    ART247

    Photography III - Advanced Digital Imaging

    This course introduces students to computer tools that manipulate and enhance digital images. Students learn the skills to enhance varied input in order to create high-quality digital output utilizing Photoshop the industry standard for digital image manipulation. Emphasis is placed on the fundamentals of the interface, understanding resolution, drawing and painting, masking, layering/compositing, color correction and retouching. Cross-listed as COM 247. Additional Fee(s): Applied laboratory fee.

    3

    ART248

    19th-Century Art

    This survey examines art movements in France, England, Germany, and other European countries from the early to late 19th-century, focusing on Romanticism and Realism, the Pre-Raphaelites, Impressionism and Post-Impressionism, and Symbolism. It explores the impact of urbanization, industrialization, and race and gender issues on visual culture.

    3

    ART250

    Introduction to Digital Video Production

    This course introduces the tools, technology, and techniques of digital video production. Students plan, script, manage, and produce videos using digital technologies. Along with the technical application, students will be exposed to the history of video as an artistic and instructional medium, as well as the relationship of digital video to film and television. The theoretical focus is on critiques of narrative construction. Cross-listed as FDT/COM 250. Additional Fee(s): Applied art fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ART141 Media Literacy
  • 3

    ART254

    Modern Art, 1900 to the Present

    In this course the student will be introduced to the major movements in European and American art since 1900. The first half will focus on 1900 to 1950 and the concept of modernism, who and what shaped it, and the shifting definitions of the artist. The second half will focus on recent trends in world art, focusing on new media and movements, including installation art, earth art, video art, postmodernism, and the new theoretical and conceptual approaches to art and art history.

    3

    ART261

    Web Design 1: Code + Aesthetics

    This course addresses methods for document production and dissemination using global electronic networks. Focus is on authoring nonlinear documents using wysiwyg software and basic web programming languages. Issues of privacy, rights of access, and intellectual property rights are discussed. Students will develop their technical, aesthetic, and conceptual skills by participating in lectures, demonstrations, computer labs, and critiques, as well as participating in critical analysis of various sites and internet strategies. Cross-listed as COM 261. Additional Fee(s): Applied art fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ART141 Media Literacy
  • 3

    ART271

    Asian Art

    This course surveys the art of India, China, Southeast Asia, Korea, and Japan from the earliest civilizations to the modern period. Since much Asian artistic production was inspired by religious belief, students also will be introduced to the major currents of Asian religion and philosophy, including Buddhism, Hinduism, Jainism, Islam, Confucianism, Daoism, and Shintoism.

    3

    ART305

    Sculpture Studio

    This advanced studio course gives the student the opportunity to study a particular process or combination of processes in more depth. Contemporary approaches such as installation and performance art, and environmental and conceptual art are introduced. Additional Fee(s): Applied art fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ART205 Sculpture Studio
  • 3

    ART309W

    Art + Land: Artists Engage the Environment

    This course explores interactions between visual artists and the natural environment. It examines 15th- to 17th-century landscape painting and the role of landscape and national identity in the 19th century. It also explores the Earth Art movement that began in the 1960s and current investigations of art and sustainability.

    3

    ART311

    Ceramics Studio

    This studio course advances the student in all technical aspects of ceramics and explores conceptual and critical approaches both to the medium and to specific contemporary issues. Additional Fee(s): Applied art fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ART211 Ceramics Studio
  • 3

    ART313

    Special Topics

    Special Topics

    3

    ART315

    Painting Studio

    This advanced course in painting gives the student a broad understanding of technical issues in the context of contemporary conceptual and critical approaches to the medium. Students will have an opportunity to work on independent projects. Additional Fee(s): Applied art fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ART115 Painting I
  • 3

    ART317

    Drawing Studio

    This advanced studio course continues figure studies from the model, as well as landscape drawing and architectural drawing. Conceptual and critical approaches to the medium are emphasized. Additional Fee(s): Applied art fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ART117 Drawing I
  • 3

    ART320

    Material Studies Studio

    Students continue to develop their understanding of three-dimensional materials and processes, their history and practice, and associated conceptual vocabularies in this studio. The course aims to challenge students with ceramic and/or sculptural skills in order to move beyond technique, and reconsider material and process from a variety of perspectives. Studio and research assignments will examine technical and conceptual concerns - prompting students to articulate and contextualize their artistic practice.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ART220 Material Studies Studio
  • 3

    ART321

    Typography Design Studio

    This class is an introduction to the concrete and conceptual aspects of typography as a visual medium. The first half of the semester will deal with the technique requirements of typography (micro typography). The second half will deal with abstract compositional uses for typography (macro typography), integrating hand skills and computer as way to render type. Historical and current forms of alphabetic communications will be explored, along with the relationship to contemporary image-based communication.

    3

    ART327

    Printmaking Studio

    This course is an exploration of the expressive possibilities of graphic media. Historical methods of printmaking are introduced. Additional Fee(s): Applied are fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ART127 Printmaking I
  • 3

    ART328

    The Carnegie International

    This course will analyze contemporary art of the past 4-5 years as organized by the curators of the Carnegie International. It will examine the history of the International and other exhibitions of this type, the globalized art market, and current media techniques and broader concerns of visual artists working today.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • ART132 History of World Art II: 1400 to Present
  • ART254 Modern Art, 1900 to the Present
  • 3

    ART330SLU

    Contemporary Humanities

    OCICU course taught at Saint Leo University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    ART350

    Intermediate Digital Video Production

    Students will utilize the nonlinear editing software program Final Cut Pro to examine methods of production and related theories involved in achieving structure in film and video. By conceptually dissecting and practically applying techniques such as splicing, transitional effects, and other editing processes, students will render sophisticated projects which are conscious of how the edit structures film and by doing so becomes another creative and technical layer for study. Cross-listed as FLM 350.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • ART150 Introduction to Digital Video Production
  • COM150 Introduction to Digital Video Production
  • FDT150 Introduction to Digital Video Production
  • 3

    ART353

    Print Design

    This course combines technical training in digital imaging with exercises in creative print-media based design and critical thinking. Students learn conceptual and technical differences between analog and digital imaging and work with a range of digital tools, including QuarkXpress, Adobe InDesign, and Photoshop. Conceptual and content discourses will be developed through contemporary issues and the design of relevant documents. Cross-listed as COM 353. Additional Fee(s): Applied art fee.

    3

    ART358

    Photography IV: Studio and Lighting Techniques

    Building upon skills learned in previous Photography classes, this foundation course introduces lighting principles in the studio and on location. Assignments include still life and studio and location portraiture. Basic view camera techniques and hand held light meters are introduced. Course focuses on the use of Black-and-White output. Fine art and commercial applications are equally emphasized.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ART142 Photography I : Black and White Darkroom
  • 3

    ART365

    Visual Communication

    This course introduces students to the process of developing a Visual Communication system with a special focus on non profit branding. An understanding of branding strategies are researched, explored and implemented to help serve the needs of growing community-based non-profits. Visual Identities are created for existing small non-profits to address their needs as well as strengthen their position in the marketplace and community.

    3

    ART366

    American Art: Colonial to 1900

    This course examines the major movements, artists, and cultural issues of American painting, sculpture, and photography from its beginnings to 1900. Special attention is given to works that address definitions of American "identity" and cultural interaction and conflict between races.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • ART132 History of World Art II: 1400 to Present
  • ART131 History of World Art I: Prehistory to 1400
  • 3

    ART368

    Museum Education and the Visual Arts

    This course traces the development of the American art museum's educational mission from the early nineteenth century to the present. A range of programming types, including docent touring, computer-based learning, museum-school partnerships, and hands-on experiences are observed and analyzed. Students will also design programs for exhibitions in the Chatham University Art Gallery.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ART208 Introduction to Art Museum Studies
  • 3

    ART372

    Curating African Art

    This course explores the rich diversity of art across sub-Sahara Africa from the Paleolithic era to today. It focuses on cultures from West Africa, Central Africa, and East Africa to complement the holdings of the College's outstanding Olkes Collection of African Art, which includes more than 600 objects. Class lecture, discussion, and student projects utilize works from the collection, including masks, wood sculpture, beadwork, and metalwork.

    3

    ART372

    Curating African Art and Artifacts

    This course explores the rich diversity of art across sub-Sahara Africa from the Paleolithic era to today. It focuses on cultures from West Africa, Central Africa, and East Africa to complement the holdings of the College's outstanding Olkes Collection of African Art, which includes more than 600 objects. Class lecture, discussion, and student projects utilize works from the collection, including masks, wood sculpture, beadwork, and metalwork.

    3

    ART378

    Curating the Visual Arts

    This course explores the roles and duties of the art museum curator. Topics addressed include collection care and management, exhibition planning and design, object handling, and exhibition critiques. Curators from local museums will serve as guest speakers. Students will collaboratively curate at least one exhibition.

    3

    ART388

    Landscape Photography

    The landscape is fascinating from a natural and contrived point of view. This course explores the art of taking landscape shots digitally with emphasis on composition, focal points, color, light, movement, time of day, framing, and weather conditions. You will explore a range of image capturing from macro flower shots to vast panoramic points of view from urban and rural subject matter. Several new digital image editing processes will be taught using Photoshop. Additional Fee(s): Applied laboratory fee.

    3

    ART405

    Sculpture Studio

    This advanced studio course gives the student the opportunity to study a particular process or combination of processes in more depth. Contemporary approaches such as installation and performance art, and environmental and conceptual art are introduced. Additional Fee(s): Applied art fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ART305 Sculpture Studio
  • 3

    ART411

    Ceramics Studio

    This studio course advances the student in all technical aspects of ceramics and explores conceptual, critical approaches both to the medium and to specific contemporary issues. Additional Fee(s): Applied art fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ART311 Ceramics Studio
  • 3

    ART415

    Painting Studio

    This advanced course in painting gives the student a broad understanding of technical issues in the context of contemporary conceptual and critical approaches to the medium. Students will have an opportunity to work on independent projects. Additional Fee(s): Applied art fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ART315 Painting Studio
  • 3

    ART417

    Drawing Studio

    This advanced studio course continues figure studies from the model, as well as landscape drawing and architectural drawing. Conceptual and critical approaches to the medium are emphasized.. Additional Fee(s): Applied art fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ART117 Drawing I
  • 3

    ART420

    Material Studies Studio

    Students continue to develop their understanding of three-dimensional materials and processes, their history and practice, and associated conceptual vocabularies in this studio. The course aims to challenge students with ceramic and/or sculptural skills in order to move beyond technique, and reconsider material and process from a variety of perspectives. Studio and research assignments will examine technical and conceptual concerns - prompting students to articulate and contextualize their artistic practice.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ART320 Material Studies Studio
  • 3

    ART427

    Printmaking Studio

    This course is an exploration of the expressive possibilities of graphic media. Historical methods of printmaking are introduced.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ART127 Printmaking I
  • 3

    ART450

    Advanced Digital Video Production Studio

    This studio course is an intensive laboratory that looks at advanced methods of digital video production, including highly developed lighting practices, audio recording and mixing, nonlinear editing, and digital effects. Students will also experiment with various ways in which to prepare video for web streaming or embedding compressed video in multimedia applications. This course includes regularly scheduled screenings of significant experimental video and multimedia projects - continuing to engage students in conversations of aesthetic, structural, and critical concern. Cross-listed as FLM 450.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • FDT350 Intermediate Digital Video Production
  • COM350 Intermediate Digital Video
  • ART350 Intermediate Digital Video Production
  • 3

    ART481

    Event Photography

    This practicum is for student's photographing (stills) and digital video for selected Chatham College events along with candid shots of students for college publications, the Communique, PR, and Chatham web pages with name credits on all published work. Earned credits will require the following: 1 credit must cover 2 events. All include lab work. Cross-listed with Com 481. Additional Fee(s): Lab Fee

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ART241 Lighting Principles
  • 1

    ART483

    Event Photography

    This practicum is for student's photographing (stills) and digital video for selected Chatham College events along with candid shots of students for college publications, the Communique, PR, and Chatham web pages with name credits on all published work. Earned credits will require the following: 3 credits must cover 5 events. All include lab work. Cross-listed with Com 483. Additional Fee(s): Lab Fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • ART142 Photography I : Black and White Darkroom
  • ART152 Photography II - Introduction to Digital Photography
  • 3

    ART490

    Integrative Capstone

    The integrative capstone, undertaken by the student during the senior year, is an extended project that helps the student complete their transition from an undergraduate student to a world-ready professional. The study usually centers on the student's major and may be conducted, at least in part, in the context of a group experience. Such programs are crafted to meet the unique needs of each major, and could include, for example, fieldwork, theater production, creative work in the arts, independent research, or independent readings. The integrative capstone in an interdisciplinary major must have the approval of both academic programs.

    3

    ART492

    Independent Study

    The designed environment influences and is influenced by human activity patterns and behavior. This course is an introduction to significant theories concerning the interaction of people and interior architecture. Emphasis is placed on shared human needs and differences based on age, culture, gender, and occupation.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 2

    ART493

    Independent Study

    This course develops graphic literacy as a language and philosophy for observation, analysis, expression, and presentation of interior architecture. Students are introduced to a number of techniques and methods of drawing used by interior designers, including freehand drawing, use of colored pencils, markers, and mechanical drafting through various exercises. An understanding is developed of architectural scale, plans, elevations, and sections. Additional work is spent on values, colors, palettes, and shadowing techniques that culminate in a final project. Cross-listed as IAR 510.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    ART495UNLV

    Special Topics Art History

    Special Topics Art History

    3

    ART498

    Tutorial: Art

    Tutorial: Art

    4

    ART499

    Tutorial: Art

    Tutorial: Art

    4

    ATH500

    Prevention and Care of Emergency Medical Conditions

    This course will teach athletic training students recognition, evaluation, and treatment of emergent medical conditions. This will include basic skills required for injury prevention, treatment and recovery as it relates to physically active populations.

    3

    ATH501

    Therapeutic Modalities

    This course educates and expands on theories and application of therapeutic modalities utilized in athletic training. Focus includes clinical decision making and evidence based utilization of modalities in pain modulation and treatment of acute and chronic conditions.

    Co-requisites

    • ATH500 Prevention and Care of Emergency Medical Conditions
    4

    ATH502

    Introduction to Professional Practice

    This course will introduce athletic training students to various aspects of professional practice as it relates to athletic training including historical aspects of the profession, ethics, documentation and collaboration with other healthcare professions to optimize patient outcomes.

    2

    ATH503

    Orthopedic and Neurologic Assessment I

    This course teaches athletic training students a systematic evaluative process including techniques involved in the assessment of orthopedic and neurological conditions of the lower extremity, pelvis, and lumbar spine.

    4

    ATH504

    Orthopedic and Neurologic Assessment II

    This course teaches athletic training students a systematic evaluative process including techniques involved in the assessment of orthopedic and neurological conditions of the upper extremity, torso, head, thoracic, and cervical spine.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ATH503 Orthopedic and Neurologic Assessment I
  • 4

    ATH505

    Medical Management of an Athletic Population

    This course teaches recognition, evaluation, management, and treatment of non-orthopedic medical conditions that affect physically active populations.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ATH503 Orthopedic and Neurologic Assessment I
  • 3

    ATH506

    Therapeutic Interventions I

    Theories, concepts and psychomotor skills in the appropriate application and utilization of therapeutic exercise in the rehabilitation of musculoskeletal injuries.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ATH503 Orthopedic and Neurologic Assessment I
  • 4

    ATH507

    Therapeutic Interventions II

    Students acquire a scientific and physiological rationale, selection criteria, indications and contraindications of exercise, and return to activity guidelines. Techniques and skills provided in both classroom and lab experiences will address range of motion, strengthening, proprioception, cardiovascular fitness, joint-specific and sport specific protocols.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ATH506 Therapeutic Interventions I
  • 4

    ATH508

    Pharmacology in Athletic Training

    The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of drugs commonly used to treat patients seen by persons working in health science professions. Medical reasons for drug treatment, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of various medications, and adverse effects are presented. Specifically emphasized are drugs affecting the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, nervous, endocrine, and gastrointestinal systems.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ATH505 Medical Management of an Athletic Population
  • 2

    ATH509

    Research Seminar I

    This course will introduce the fundamentals of research design and interpretation, including basic statistical analysis. Students will identify, locate and appraise current literature related to athletic training and determine how it applies to clinical practice.

    1

    ATH510

    Research Seminar II

    This course will introduce the fundamentals of qualitative research design and other topics including disablement models, clinical prediction rules, patient oriented outcomes. Students will gain an understanding of qualitative research and its applicability in the Athletic Training profession.

    1

    ATH511

    Research Seminar III

    This course will promote student analysis and summary of quantitative research as it relates to athletic training. Students will develop a research question, search literature, summarize and make evidence based clinical recommendations stemming from their research.

    1

    ATH512

    Clinical Experience in Athletic Training I

    This course is designed to allow students to review and demonstrate lower extremity and lumbar spine injury evaluations, foundational athletic training skills, modality implementation and emergency management techniques through the completion of a 12-week clinical education experience of approximately 240 clinical hours.

    3

    ATH513

    Clinical Experience in Athletic Training II

    This course is designed to allow students to develop clinical proficiency in the evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of upper extremity dysfunction, demonstrate therapeutic exercise and modality applications through the completion of a 15-week clinical education experience of approximately 240 hours.

    3

    ATH514

    Clinical Experience in Athletic Training III

    This course is designed expose students to common non-orthopedic medical conditions present in physically active patients across the lifespan. Students will complete experiences collaborating with other health care providers in local primary or urgent care clinics through the completion of an 8- week clinical education experience approximately 160 hours.

    2

    ATH515

    Clinical Experience in Athletic Training IV

    This course is designed develop and enhance the practical skills and knowledge necessary for clinical practice, develop student clinical proficiency in all areas of the athletic training profession and facilitate increasing levels of autonomous practice through completion of a student selected 10-week fully immersive clinical education experience approximately 320 hours.

    4

    ATH516

    Clinical Experience in Athletic Training V

    This course is designed to develop and enhance the practical skills and knowledge necessary for clinical practice, develop student clinical proficiency in all areas of the athletic training profession and facilitate increasing levels of autonomous practice through completion of a student selected 10-week immersive clinical education experience approximately 240 hours.

    3

    ATH517

    Administration and Management

    This course will address administration responsibilities, policies, and procedures as they relate to the athletic training profession. Focus will be placed on legal and ethical practices, budget, record keeping, facility design and budget as well as job seeking, and interview skills.

    3

    ATH518

    Optimizing Athletic Performance

    This course explores the concepts of assessing, designing, and implementing specialized performance programs to address the health and performance goals of the athletes. The primary focus is on movement instruction, nutrition, energy systems, program design and concepts of strength and conditioning.

    3

    ATH519

    Advanced Topics in Athletic Training

    This course provides students the opportunity to examine advanced issues that shape the athletic training profession through practical application and professional development. Emphasis is placed on surgical techniques, radiological concepts and interpretation, laboratory reports, interpreting imaging, and lifespan issues and advanced treatment procedures used in diverse settings.

    3

    ATH520

    Certification Preparation Course

    This course is designed to prepare students for the Board of Certification Examination and for becoming licensed to practice as an athletic trainer. Through the use of self-assessments, students will identify areas of strengths and weaknesses, create tailored study plans, and complete practice examinations.

    1

    ATH521

    Advanced Sports Nutrition

    This course discusses scientifically founded sports nutrition including macro nutrients, energy expenditure in sport and exercise, dietary requirements pre-activity, during and post activity, ergogenic aids and nutritional supplements in a variety of active populations. Various diets and their implications/impact on the body will also be discussed.

    3

    ATH522

    Healthcare Delivery

    This course will discuss the historic development, organization and characteristics of health care delivery systems, payment and reimbursement systems, accrediting agencies applicable to athletic training, organizational patterns of health care facilities, medical staff organization and bylaws; and the athletic training profession from its initiation to the present and future.

    3

    BA4158RU

    Money and Banking

    OCICU course taught at Regis University

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    BA465RU

    Strategic Management

    OCICU course taught at Regis University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    BA480IRU

    Entrepreneurship Seminar

    OCICU course taught at Regis University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    BFIN3321UIW

    Principles of Financial Management

    OCICU course taught at University of the Incarnate World.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    BIO 135

    Applied Human Biology

    4

    BIO114

    Basic Nutrition

    This course is an overview of scientific principles of nutrition and their application to humans throughout the life cycle. It is designed for students who need a broad coverage of nutrition and have little or no background in science. Enrollment in a school of nursing is required.

    3

    BIO115

    Basic Microbiology with Lab

    This course is designed for students who need a broad coverage of microbiology and have little or no background in biology or chemistry. It includes a study of microscopic organisms and their relation to health and disease. There is a special emphasis on disinfection, sterilization, immunology, and microbiological aspects of infectious disease. Three hours of lecture and two hours of lab per week. Enrollment in a school of nursing is required.

    4

    BIO116

    Basic Anatomy and Physiology I with Lab

    This is the first of two courses designed for students who need a broad coverage of anatomy and physiology and have little or no background in science. It includes a study of the structure and function of human cells, tissue, organs, and systems. Clinical applications of anatomy and physiology will also be considered. Three hours of lecture and two hours of lab per week. Enrollment in a school of nursing is required.

    4

    BIO117

    Basic Anatomy and Physiology II with lab

    This is the second of two courses designed for students who need a broad coverage of anatomy and physiology and have little or no background in science. It includes a study of the structure and function of human cells, tissue, organs, and systems. Clinical applications of anatomy and physiology will also be considered. Three hours of lecture and two hours of lab per week.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • BIO116 Basic Anatomy and Physiology I with Lab
  • 4

    BIO118

    Environmental Health Issues

    This course addresses the connection between health and the environment. Topics include; the areas of environmental epidemiology, toxicology, and policy, agents of environmental disease, and water, air, and soil quality. The work of scientists and public health specialists to discover, assess, and reduce exposure and risk to environment health problems are also explored. Case studies are used to provide context and background for the environmental health issues past and present.

    3

    BIO119

    Medical Terminology

    This course is designed for students who need a broad coverage of medical terminology and who have little or no background. It includes studies of etymology and human anatomy. There is a special emphasis on clinical applications. Three hours of lecture including media presentations per week.

    3

    BIO123

    Nutrition

    An introduction to nutrients, their composition, functions, and sources. Human physiology, including digestion, metabolism, and excretion, is covered, along with special nutritional needs throughout the life cycle. Integrated with this basic information are special topics pertaining to diets, organic foods, preservatives, pesticides, world hunger, and other current concerns. Two hours of lecture per week.

    2

    BIO123

    Nutrition

    An introduction to nutrients, their composition, functions, and sources. Human physiology, including digestion, metabolism, and excretion, is covered, along with special nutritional needs throughout the life cycle. Integrated with this basic information are special topics pertaining to diets, organic foods, preservatives, pesticides, world hunger, and other current concerns.

    3

    BIO131

    Human Genetics

    This course is designed to help students understand issues in genetic research and biotechnology. Topics include pedigrees, birth defects, cancer, and the creation of transgenic animals. Two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fee.

    2

    BIO131

    Human Genetics

    This course is designed to help students understand issues in genetic research and biotechnology. Topics include Mendelian genetics, DNA structure and testing, pedigrees, birth defects, cancer, and the creation of transgenic plants and animals. Three hours of lecture per week.

    3

    BIO131L

    Human Genetics Laboratory

    Laboratory course emphasizing human genetics. Experiments will correlate with and enhance the lecture in BIO131. Two hours of laboratory per week. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fee.

    Co-requisites

    1

    BIO135

    Applied Human Biology

    This course is designed to introduce non-science majors to major aspects of human biology. The course will be taught as a series of modules covering the basic biology of various human systems followed by applications that are appropriate to the needs of students.

    3

    BIO135L

    Applied Human Biology Lab

    Laboratory course emphasizing aspects of human biology. Experiments will correlate with and enhance lectures in BIO 135.

    1

    BIO143

    The Cell

    This course is designed to provide a broad overview of current biological concepts, including cell structure, function, division, and basic genetics. Biologically important molecules also are presented. This course serves as the foundation for all upper-level biology courses. Three hours of class

    3

    BIO143L

    Lab: The Cell

    Experiments to complement the material presented in BIO143. Two hours of laboratory per week. Corequisite or Prerequisite: BIO143. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fee.

    1

    BIO144

    The Organism

    This course provides a general survey of animals and plants at the organismic level, with emphasis on their evolution and various physiological processes such as respiration, circulation, digestion, and reproduction. This course serves as the foundation for all upper-level biology courses. Three hours of class.

    3

    BIO144L

    Lab: The Organism

    Experiments to complement the material presented in BIO144. Two hours of laboratory per week. Corequisite: BIO144. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fees.

    1

    BIO201

    Anatomy

    This course introduces students to the basic concepts of anatomy. Lectures emphasize the human body and clinical applications of anatomy. They focus on anatomical terminology, gross structures, body movements, forming a three-dimensional mental image of body parts, and functional understanding of normal structures. Three hours of class per week.

    3

    BIO201L

    Lab: Anatomy

    Laboratory experiments emphasizing comparative anatomy between humans and other animals. Three hours of laboratory per week. Corequisite: BIO201. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fees.

    2

    BIO205

    Human Cadaver Dissection

    Students in this course will dissect a human subject, learning techniques with scalpels and scissors to separate and prepare the gross anatomy for study. This is an experiential lab course with teaching by example and supervision. A core part of this experience is learning professionalism in dealing with subjects, as well as lab safety and human remain protocols.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • BIO201 Anatomy
  • Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • BIO201L Lab: Anatomy
  • BIO201LW Lab: Anatomy
  • 3

    BIO209

    Basic Neuroscience

    This course is designed for wide appeal. It is an introduction to structure and function of the brain and spinal cord, and how nerves function and communicate. The basics of movement, sensation, language, emotion, and consciousness are discussed. Emphasis is placed on contrasting normal function with altered function in diseases. Three hours lecture per week.

    3

    BIO209LW

    Basic Neuroscience Lab

    Experiments and skills to compliment the material presented in BIO209. The lab course focuses on experimental procedures, scientific analysis and scientific writing. Three hours of laboratory per week. Laboratory Fee. Corequisite: BIO 209.

    2

    BIO213

    Special Topics: Women's Health Issues

    3

    BIO218

    Women's Health Issues

    This course examines the biology of women, both cis gender and people within trans communities, providing a framework for the discussion of health issues, current research, treatments, and historical perspectives. Aspects of reproductive life and an examination of psychological, sociological and cultural influence.

    3

    BIO221

    General Microbiology

    The study of fundamental characteristics of bacteria and related microorganisms, including taxonomy, physiology, and distribution. Three class meetings per week.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 2 of the following courses:
  • CHM108 Chemistry II
  • CHM110L Chemistry II Laboratory
  • Complete all 2 of the following courses:
  • BIO143 The Cell
  • BIO144 The Organism
  • 3

    BIO221LW

    Lab: General Microbiology

    Experiments to complement the material in BIO221. Four hours of laboratory per week. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fees.

    Co-requisites

    • BIO221 General Microbiology
    • BIO303 Applied and Environmental Microbiology
    2

    BIO224

    Botany

    An introduction to the structure and function of plants. Topics include the evolutionary rise of green plants, plant life cycles and development, plant physiology, plant ecology, and the morphology and taxonomy of vascular plants. The importance of plants fro humans is discussed, including their use for food and medicine. Three hours of lecture per week.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 2 of the following courses:
  • BIO144 The Organism
  • BIO143 The Cell
  • 3

    BIO224L

    Lab: Botany

    Experiments to complement the material presented in BIO224. Four hours of laboratory or field experience per week. Corequisite: BIO224. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fees.

    Co-requisites

    2

    BIO226

    Toxicology

    An introduction to toxic substances, their classification, entry into living systems, modes of action, and fate. Various living systems are considered, from the subcellular to the ecosystem level. Three hours of lecture per week.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 4 of the following courses:
  • BIO143 The Cell
  • BIO144 The Organism
  • CHM109L Chemistry I Laboratory
  • CHM110L Chemistry II Laboratory
  • 3

    BIO231

    Cell and Molecular Biology

    A lecture course covering the organelles and activities of cells. Topics include the structure of proteins and other biomolecules, bioenergetics and enzymes, membranes, the mitochondrion, the chloroplast, the endo-membrane system, the cytoskeleton, and the nucleus and cellular reproduction.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 2 of the following courses:
  • BIO143 The Cell
  • CHM108 Chemistry II
  • 3

    BIO231W

    Cell and Molecular Biology

    A lecture course covering the organelles and activities of cells. Topics include the structure of proteins and other biomolecules, bioenergetics and enzymes, membranes, the mitochondrion, the chloroplast, the endo-membrane system, the cytoskeleton, and the nucleus and cellular reproduction.

    3

    BIO248

    Ecology

    A study of the interrelation between organisms and their environment. Three hours of lecture per week.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 2 of the following courses:
  • BIO144 The Organism
  • BIO143 The Cell
  • 3

    BIO248LW

    Lab: Ecology

    Experiments to complement the material presented in BIO248. Four hours of laboratory or field experience per week. Corequisite: BIO248. Additional Fee (s): Laboratory fee.

    2

    BIO255

    Biomedical Ethics

    This course examines moral dilemmas created or intensified by recent advances in medical technology. Examples of topics include euthanasia and the right to die, abortion, behavior modification, allocation of scarce medical resources, in vitro fertilization, genetic screening and engineering, and human experimentation.

    3

    BIO302

    Physiology

    This course introduces students to the basic concepts of physiology. The lectures will emphasize chemical principles, cellular biological principles, and a survey of the nervous, endocrine, immune, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, excretory, respiratory, and digestive systems. The laboratory will emphasize comparative physiology between humans and other animals. Three hours of class per week.

    3

    BIO302L

    Physiology Lab

    Laboratory experiments emphasizing comparative physiology between human and other animals. Three hours of laboratory per week. Corequisite: BIO302. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fees.

    2

    BIO303

    Applied and Environmental Microbiology

    This course will focus on the importance of microorganisms in environmental and industrial processes, and the role of scientific research in finding solutions to applied problems. Areas that will be covered include basic microbiology, soil and water microbiology, agricultural and food microbiology, and public health microbiology.

    3

    BIO319

    Experimental Neuroscience

    With an emphasis on neuropathology, the course builds on the foundations of neuroscience to explore advanced topics in sensation, motor control. emotion, and cognition. Classical and modern methods for investigating the structure and function of the nervous system will be examined through lectures, discussions, and student projects.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • BIO209 Basic Neuroscience
  • Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • BIO231 Cell and Molecular Biology
  • BIO231W Cell and Molecular Biology
  • 3

    BIO408

    Developmental Biology

    A study of the embryonic and post-embryonic development of animals, with special emphasis on humans. The morphogenesis, growth and mechanisms of differentiation are stressed. Other topics include cancer, regeneration, cloning, hormones as mediators of development, and developmental genetics.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • BIO231 Cell and Molecular Biology
  • 3

    BIO417

    Genetics

    This study of the modern concepts of the gene stresses theory and experimental evidence relating to the structure of the gene, heritability of characteristics, and the behavior of genes in populations. Three hours of lecture per week.

    3

    BIO418

    Chemical Analysis Laboratory

    This laboratory teaches the proper design, implementation and analysis of modern techniques in instrumental chemistry, encompassing spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and separation science. In addition, several inorganic compounds are synthesized and characterized. Student-originated research projects are used extensively throughout this course. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • CHM216L Organic Chemistry Laboratory
  • 3

    BIO419

    Immunology

    This course covers fundamental principles of immunology with emphasis on molecular and cellular immunology, including antigen and antibody structure and function, effector mechanisms, complement, major histocompatibility complexes, and the cellular basis for the immune response. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite(s): BIO221 or BIO302

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • BIO221 General Microbiology
  • 3

    BIO438

    Biochemistry I

    This course covers the structure and functions of proteins, polynucleic acids, and biological membranes. Enzymes and kinetics are taught. Metabolic pathways, with emphasis on the thermodynamics of the equilibria and the storage and usage of energy, are covered.

    3

    BIO439

    Biochemistry II

    Metabolism is studied with an emphasis on anabolic pathways and special pathways such as cytochrome P450. Other topics include molecular genetics and protein synthesis, hormones and receptors, and immunology. Cross-listed as CHM339.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • BIO438 Biochemistry I
  • CHM338 Biochemistry I
  • 3

    BIO440L

    Macromolecule Laboratory

    An advanced laboratory course for junior and senior science majors who wish to gain theoretical and practical experience with the techniques and equipment commonly used in the fields of cellular biology, molecular biology, and biochemistry. Topics include PCR, electrophoresis, enzyme kinetics, aseptic cell and tissue culture, cell surface receptors, and molecular modeling. Five-hour laboratory with one-hour pre-lab lecture each week. Cross-listed as CHM340.

    2

    BIO440LW

    Macromolecule Laboratory

    An advanced laboratory course for junior and senior science majors who wish to gain theoretical and practical experience with the techniques and equipment commonly used in the fields of cellular biology, molecular biology, and biochemistry. Topics include PCR, electrophoresis, enzyme kinetics, aseptic cell and tissue culture, cell surface receptors, and molecular modeling. Five-hour laboratory with one-hour pre-lab lecture each week. Cross-listed as CHM340. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fee.

    2

    BIO455

    Biomedical Ethics

    This course examines moral dilemmas created or intensified by recent advances in medical technology. Examples of topics include euthanasia and the right to die, abortion, behavior modification, allocation of scarce medical resources, in vitro fertilization, genetic screening and engineering, and human experimentation. Three hours of lecture per week.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • BIO302 Physiology
  • BIO408 Developmental Biology
  • BIO417 Genetics
  • 3

    BIO458

    Histology

    A microscopic analysis of human and animal tissue and organ function at the cellular level. Material comes from text book, lecture, images and animations in addition to practical application and identification of histological specimens. Recommended for students planning to apply to professional schools of medicine, veterinary medicine, or dentistry.

    3

    BIO461

    Aquatic Entomology

    Aquatic environments harbor a vast number of insect species that are widely used as biological indicators of environmental health. This course introduces the physiological, ecological, and biomonitoring attributes of aquatic insects and emphasizes taxonomic identification. Preparation for a formal identification certification test from the Society for Freshwater Science is optional.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • SUS201 Integrative Biology
  • Complete all 2 of the following courses:
  • BIO143 The Cell
  • BIO144 The Organism
  • 3

    BIO461L

    Aquatic Entomology Laboratory

    Aquatic environments harbor a vast number of insect species that are widely used as biological indicators of environmental health. This laboratory section complements the course introducing the physiological, ecological, and biomonitoring attributes of aquatic insects. Laboratory assignments will emphasize taxonomic identification and sampling techniques.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 2 of the following courses:
  • BIO143 The Cell
  • BIO144 The Organism
  • Complete the following course:
  • SUS202 Dynamic Earth Systems
  • 1

    BIO481W

    Ecology and Environmental Journal Club

    Presentations and discussions of important research papers from the current literature. One class meeting per week. Co-requisite: BIO 498 or 499 or CHM 498 or 499 or permission of instructor.

    Co-requisites

    2

    BIO484

    Plant Physiology

    This course is an introduction to the physiology and biochemistry of plants. Lectures and laboratory exercises cover plant cells, enzymes, transport of water and nutrients, metabolism, defenses against pathogens, gene expression, hormones, and responses to environmental stimuli. Three lectures per week.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 3 of the following courses:
  • BIO224 Botany
  • CHM109L Chemistry I Laboratory
  • CHM110L Chemistry II Laboratory
  • 3

    BIO484L

    Lab: Plant Physiology

    Experiments to complement the material presented in BIO384. Four hours of laboratory per week. Corequisite: BIO484. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fees.

    Co-requisites

    2

    BIO490

    Integrative Capstone

    The integrative capstone, undertaken by the student during the senior year, is an extended project that helps the student complete their transition from an undergraduate student to a world-ready professional. The study usually centers on the student's major and may be conducted, at least in part, in the context of a group experience. Such programs are crafted to meet the unique needs of each major, and could include, for example, fieldwork, theater production, creative work in the arts, independent research, or independent readings. The integrative capstone in an interdisciplinary major must have the approval of both academic programs.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • IND350W Scientific Research Methods
  • 3

    BIO491

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 1

    BIO492

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 2

    BIO493

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    BIO494

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 4

    BIO498

    Tutorial: Biology

    4

    BIO499

    Tutorial: Biology

    4

    BIO502

    Human Gross Anatomy

    An in-depth study of gross human anatomic structure, emphasizing the musculoskeletal and neuromuscular systems through study of head and neck, body wall, and upper and lower extremity structures. Clinical correlates examine normal movement and pathological processes. Four hours of class and three hours of laboratory per week.

    6

    BIO502

    Human Gross Anatomy

    An in-depth study of gross human anatomic structure, emphasizing the musculoskeletal and neuromuscular systems through study of head and neck, body wall, and upper and lower extremity structures. Clinical correlates examine normal movement and pathological processes. Four hours of class and three hours of laboratory per week.

    4

    BIO502L

    Lab: Human Gross Anatomy

    0

    BIO502L

    Human Gross Anatomy Lab

    Human Gross Anatomy Lab

    2

    BIO503

    Human Anatomy

    This course provides a basic understanding of human anatomy, with an emphasis on the osteology and muscles of the upper and lower limbs, including the back. It uses a combination of systems-based and region-specific instruction. Lectures are complimented by laboratory exercises based upon the A.D.A.M. computer program. Three hours of class and two hours of laboratory per week.

    3

    BIO503L

    Laboratory: Human Anatomy

    Laboratory: Human Anatomy

    1

    BIO504

    Human Physiology

    An in-depth study of the mechanisms of human body function, emphasizing cells, genetic control of protein synthesis, transport across membranes, contraction and excitation of muscles, the physiology of cardiac muscle, and rhythmical excitation of the normal heart.

    3

    BIO506

    Principles of Neuroscience

    A study of the structure and function of the human central and peripheral nervous system, including vascular components and special senses. The course emphasizes nervous system control of movement. Three hours of class per week.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • BIO502 Human Gross Anatomy
  • BIO502 Human Gross Anatomy
  • 3

    BIO506L

    Lab: Principles of Neuroscience

    Laboratory experience includes the human nervous system material, brain sections, and anatomical models. Two hours of Laboratory per week.

    Co-requisites

    • BIO506 Principles of Neuroscience
    1

    BIO508

    Developmental Biology

    A study of the embryonic and post-embryonic development of animals, with special emphasis on humans. The morphogenesis, growth and mechanisms of differentiation are stressed. Other topics include cancer, regeneration, cloning, hormones as mediators of development, and developmental genetics.

    3

    BIO509

    Fundamentals of Neuroscience

    This course is designed to examine the fundamental aspects of nervous system function, emphasizing the bases of excitability, synaptic transmission and neuron target interactions. BIO509 introduces students to the basics of integrative neural function, including sensory, motor, learning, memory, and limbic systems. Three hours of lecture per week.

    3

    BIO509L

    Fundamentals of Neuroscience Lab

    Laboratory exercises to compliment lectures in BIO509, including study of human nervous system material, brain sections, and anatomical models. Two hours of Laboratory per week.

    1

    BIO512

    Advanced Human Gross Anatomy

    An in-depth study of both regional gross human anatomic structures & cellular level tissue. The course is clinically oriented with emphasis on the musculoskeletal, neuromuscular, gastrointestinal, cardiopulmonary, urinary & reproductive systems. Regional study of the head/neck, trunk, and upper/lower extremities, is accomplished through human cadaver dissection.

    3

    BIO512L

    Advanced Human Gross Anatomy Lab

    The laboratory compliment to BIO512, this course uses human cadavers to facilitate a deeper appreciation for regional gross human anatomic structures. The course is clinically oriented with emphasis on the musculoskeletal, neuromuscular, gastrointestinal, cardiopulmonary, urinary and reproductive systems, via regional study of the head/neck, trunk, and upper/lower extremities.

    Co-requisites

    • BIO512 Advanced Human Gross Anatomy
    2

    BIO513

    Integrated Seminar in Applied and Environmental Microbiology

    This course will provide a forum for interdisciplinary learning and discussion in the core areas of applied and environmental microbiology. Students will analyze case studies based on real-world issues, use evidence-based practice to devise solutions to applied problems, and develop communication skills to convey disciplinary knowledge to different audiences.

    3

    BIO514

    Advanced Human Physiology

    An in-depth study of the mechanisms of human body function, emphasizing cells, genetic control of protein synthesis, transport across membranes, contraction and excitation of muscles, the physiology of cardiac muscle, and rhythmical excitation of the normal heart.

    3

    BIO516

    Advanced Neuroscience

    A study of the structure and function of the human central and peripheral nervous system, including vascular components and special senses. The course emphasizes nervous system control of movement. Three hours of class per week.

    3

    BIO516L

    Advanced Neuroscience Lab

    This lab complements the lectures in BIO516, using hands-on laboratory and data collection exercises. It examines nervous system function, emphasizing excitability, synaptic transmission and neuron-target interactions. It also includes a study of integrative neural function in sensory, motor, learning, memory and limbic systems. Two hours of laboratory per week.

    Co-requisites

    • BIO516 Advanced Neuroscience
    2

    BIO517

    Genetics

    A study of the modern concepts of the gene. Lectures stress theory and experimental evidence relating to the structure of the gene, heritability of characteristics, and the behavior of genes in populations.

    3

    BIO518

    Chemical Analysis Laboratory

    This laboratory teaches the proper design, implementation and analysis of modern techniques in instrumental chemistry, encompassing spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and separation science. In addition, several inorganic compounds are synthesized and characterized. Student-originated research projects are used extensively throughout this course. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fee.

    3

    BIO519

    Immunology

    This course covers fundamental principles of immunology with emphasis on molecular and cellular immunology, including antigen and antibody structure and function, effector mechanisms, complement, major histocompatibility complexes, and the cellular basis for the immune response. Three hours of lecture per week.

    3

    BIO532

    Biostatistics

    The study and application of biostatistics and probability distributions in biology, for students who already have a working knowledge of statistics and want to understand the place and application of biostatistical methods in science. Topics include hypothesis testing, analysis of variance for one and many variables, and linear and nonlinear regression. Three hours of class per week.

    3

    BIO538

    Biochemistry I

    This course offers the structure and function of proteins, polynucleic acids, and biological membranes. Enzymes and kinetics are also taught. Metabolic pathways, with emphasis on the thermodynamics of the equilibria and the storage and usage of energy are also discussed.

    3

    BIO539

    Biochemistry II

    This course offers the structure and function of proteins, polynucleic acids, and biological membranes. Enzymes and kinetics are also taught. Metabolic pathways, with emphasis on the thermodynamics of the equilibria and the storage and usage of energy are also discussed.

    3

    BIO540L

    Macromolecule Laboratory

    An advanced laboratory course for junior or senior science majors who wish to gain theoretical and practical experience with the techniques and equipment commonly used in the fields of cellular biology, molecular biology, and biochemistry. Topics include PCR, electrophoresis, enzyme kinetics, aseptic cell and tissue culture, cell surface receptors, and molecular modeling. Five-hour laboratory with one-hour pre-lab lecture each week.

    2

    BIO552

    Computational Drug Design

    Study of computational techniques of importance in contemporary drug design. Topics include molecular docking, ligand binding free energy calculations, de novo drug design, pharmacophore elucidation, quantitative structure-activity relations, and combinatorial library design. Cross-listed as BIO 452 and CHM 452.

    3

    BIO553

    Special Topics in Biology

    Lectures and/or laboratories in selected areas of contemporary biology, with a focus of recent research.

    3

    BIO555

    Medical and Bio-ethics

    This course will discuss selected topics in medical ethics emphasizing methods of ethical reasoning about moral dilemmas and contributions of philosophical theories and principles to practical problems of medicine. Includes legal aspects of health care decisions.

    3

    BIO558

    Histology

    A microscopic analysis of human and animal tissue and organ function at the cellular level. Material comes from textbook, lecture, images and animations in addition to practical application and identification of histological specimens. Recommended for students planning to apply to professional schools of medicine, veterinary medicine, or dentistry.

    3

    BIO561

    Pharmacology

    This course covers the general principles of drug action, including administration, distribution, mechanism, and excretion. Emphasis will be placed on key pharmacological concepts, basic signal transduction pathways and molecular mechanisms. Pharmacology of the nervous, cardiovascular, and endocrine systems as well as the mechanisms of various antimicrobial agents will be considered.

    3

    BIO562

    Cardiometabolic Disease

    This course is a focused course extending the concepts related to human physiology. It is expected that each student has an advanced knowledge of the physiological systems of the body as well as basic understanding of the pathophysiology related to cardiovascular and metabolic disease.

    3

    BIO612L

    Cadaver Dissection Lab

    This course presents an extensive overview of gross human anatomic structure, through cadaver dissection, emphasizing the thoracic and abdominal viscera, as well as the musculoskeletal and neuromuscular systems. Evident pathologies are highlighted when present. Strong emphasis is placed upon the development of excellent dissection skills and practices.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 2 of the following courses:
  • BIO512 Advanced Human Gross Anatomy
  • BIO512L Advanced Human Gross Anatomy Lab
  • 3

    BIO623

    Methods of Biological Research

    Study of common research methods and ethics in biological disciplines. Students perform various tasks associated with ethics, learn to organize scientific literature, research a course topic in depth, provide a topical presentation, and lead a scientific paper discussion. These elements can spur proposal development for scientific inquiry projects.

    2

    BIO637

    Internship

    Internship

    1

    BIO638

    Internship

    Internship

    2

    BIO639

    Internship

    Internship

    3

    BIO691

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 1

    BIO692

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 2

    BIO693

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    BIO698

    Biology Thesis I

    Research in an area of biology. This is the first of two courses that result in a thesis approved by a committee of three faculty members.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • BIO650 Research Proposal
  • 3

    BIO699

    Biology Thesis II

    Research in an area of biology. This is the second of two courses that result in a thesis approved by a committee of three faculty members.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • BIO698 Biology Thesis I
  • 3

    BIO800

    Graduate Continuing Credit

    Graduate Continuing Credit

    1

    BIOL1401UIW

    Diversity of Life and Laboratory

    OCICU course taught at University of the Incarnate World.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 4

    BMKT3377UIW

    Consumer Behavior

    OCICU course taught at University of the Incarnate World.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    BUS105

    Foundations of Business

    The course combines the theory and practice of business and fosters analytical thinking. Students build a foundation for learning by gaining an understanding of business organizations, their structure and functions, the global setting in which they compete, environmental components and the challenges of an increasingly dynamic, complex work environment.

    3

    BUS110

    Business Statistics

    This course introduces essential research tools in business. Topics include descriptive statistics of central tendency and variability and hypotheses testing statistical analysis using correlation, analysis of variance, and regression. Problems use applications from business cases, marketing research, and economic policy.

    3

    BUS138

    Eden Hall Experiences - Ecosystems: Food to Fun

    This experiential class uses the Eden Hall Campus and surrounding environment to give students a hands-on understanding of their relationship and dependence on ecosystem services. The class looks at examples of the four ecosystem services - provisioning, regulating, supporting and cultural.

    1

    BUS145

    Sustainability in Action

    This course combines classroom instruction with real-world application. Students are familiarized with the latest science concerning environmental degradation, sources of adverse environmental impact and opportunities for making improvements. We will review current theory and practical methods for increasing targeted pro-environmental behaviors (PEB) given the scope of individual, organization, and community-level conditions that may be present.

    3

    BUS171

    Information Systems and Operations

    This course explores basic concepts of communication networks (e.g., the Internet), hardware, software, databases, and systems. Students apply information systems to decision making, communication, collaboration and coordination in the operations of contemporary organizations. Students gain skills in word processing, presentation software, data visualization, spreadsheets, and relational databases.

    3

    BUS213

    Special Topics

    Special Topics

    3

    BUS213E

    Special Topics: Sustainability in Action

    Special Topics: Sustainability in Action

    3

    BUS217

    Introduction to Project Management

    This course covers concepts and techniques of Project Management (PM), given the triple constraint of limited cost, time, and project scope. Students acquire knowledge of generally accepted tools and become familiar with techniques for achieving project success. The coursework prepares the student for the Certified Associated Project Manager (CAPM) examination.

    2

    BUS230

    Organizational Behavior

    This course teaches students to understand, explain, and improve human behavior in organizations. Most organizations focus efforts on improving job performance and organizational commitment. The purpose of this course is to provide a theoretical foundation and realistic understanding of how human behavior influences the effectiveness of the modern corporation.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • BUS105 Foundations of Business
  • 3

    BUS230W

    Organizational Behavior

    Organizational behavior is a field of study that seeks to understand, explain, and improve human behavior in organizations. Most organizations focus their efforts on improving job performance and organizational commitment. The purpose of this course is to provide a theoretical foundation and realistic understanding of how human behavior influences the effectiveness of the modern corporation.

    3

    BUS240

    International Business

    This course provides the background on the relationships among multinational corporations, international financial markets, and government agencies. Multinational corporations' strategic formulations of product policy research and development, production, and supply systems, as well as financing of international operations, are examined. This course fulfills a global general education mission requirement.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • BUS105 Foundations of Business
  • 3

    BUS243

    Principles of Marketing

    This course introduces students to the basic concepts of marketing strategy and management. Basic marketing concepts such as strategic segmentation, targeting, positioning, product design, pricing, promotions and distribution are covered. Environmental sustainability is analyzed from the consumer perspective.

    3

    BUS243W

    Principles of Marketing

    This course introduces students to the basic concepts of marketing strategy and management. Basic marketing concepts such as strategic segmentation, targeting, positioning, product design, pricing, promotions and distribution are covered. Environmental sustainability is analyzed from the consumer perspective.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • BUS105 Foundations of Business
  • 3

    BUS244

    Consumer Behavior

    The course reviews and evaluates the major theories of consumer behavior from the economics, behavioral sciences, and marketing literatures. The use of consumer research data for marketing decisions is emphasized. Topics include market segmentation, theories of brand choice, family decision making, life cycle theories, and the diffusion of innovations.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • BUS243 Principles of Marketing
  • BUS243W Principles of Marketing
  • 3

    BUS257

    Business Law and Business Ethics

    This course introduces students to the introductory concepts of business law including employment law, social and environmental responsibility of corporations, and international business law. It also emphasizes frameworks for conducting ethical analysis and the analysis of ethical dilemmas.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • BUS105 Foundations of Business
  • 3

    BUS272

    Principles of Finance

    This course enables students to apply fundamental ideas of financial economics to problems in corporate finance. Participants will gain an overview of valuation principles, learn basic principles of corporate finance from the perspective of a financial manager, and through case studies, analyze important financial decisions made within firms.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ACT222 Financial Accounting Principles I
  • 3

    BUS301

    Introduction to Six Sigma

    This course introduces students to the concepts, technical tools, and skills essential for problem solving and decision making using Six Sigma methodologies. The course is delivered in six modules (Overview, Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, and Control) supplemented by a collaborative laboratory session for students to apply the concepts learned.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • BUS110 Business Statistics
  • MTH110 Elementary Statistics
  • 1

    BUS301

    Introduction to Continuous Improvement Methodologies

    This course introduces students to concepts, tools, and skills essential for problem solving, decision making, and change management using continuous improvement methodologies. Continuous improvement methodologies covered in the course include introductions to Lean, Six Sigma, the Toyota Production System, and Agile. The course will include a class project.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • BUS110 Business Statistics
  • MTH110 Elementary Statistics
  • 3

    BUS310W

    Business Analytics: Research Methods

    This course introduces research methods and tools as the foundations of business analytics. Topics include problem definition, literature review, theory development, research design, sampling theory, construct measurement, data collection, data analysis, reporting results, interpreting findings, and developing actionable recommendations.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MTH110 Elementary Statistics
  • BUS110 Business Statistics
  • PSY213 Statistics and Research Design
  • 3

    BUS312

    Marketing Research

    Business leaders at all levels need to be intelligent designers and consumers of marketing research. The essential aspects of qualitative and quantitative marketing research design and execution are addressed with assigned readings, class discussions, homework problems, in-class exercises, cases, and a team led custom research study.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • BUS243 Principles of Marketing
  • 3

    BUS317

    Systems Analysis and Design

    This course introduces information systems analysis and design for contemporary organizations, with a focus on developing critical skills in communicating with people as users, analyzing processes, translating needs into information systems requirements, and testing of prototype ideas. Topics also include functional, structural, and behavioral modeling, and Unified Modeling Language (UML).

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • CMP283 Database Management Systems
  • 3

    BUS350

    Advertising and Promotion

    This course offers a detailed study of advertising and promotion, including public relations and support media. An integrated marketing communications perspective is emphasized. Advertising and promotion are examined utilizing a range of media outlets, including the internet, television, consumer magazines and professional journals.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • BUS243 Principles of Marketing
  • BUS243W Principles of Marketing
  • 3

    BUS357

    Strategy and Entrepreneurial Ventures

    This course illustrates the strategic management framework by taking students through the entrepreneurial process from start-up growth while exploring the personal and professional challenges. The student examines key issues in opportunity recognition, financing models, strategic choices, and sources of competitive advantage at different stages of the firm's development.

    3

    BUS390

    Human Resources Management

    This course uses readings and case studies to assess and evaluate alternative approaches in staffing, training and development, organization development, performance appraisal, compensation, benefits, labor relations, and collective bargaining. The emphasis of the course is to help students understand these elements of human resources management within an integrated systems approach.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • BUS105 Foundations of Business
  • 3

    BUS395W

    Leadership and Management

    This course builds students' ability to identify challenges facing managers in 21st century organizations. The course covers theories and applications of leadership in the changing environment of today's world. Students learn organizational skills, presentation skills, and critical thinking skills. Writing skills are emphasized.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • BUS105 Foundations of Business
  • 3

    BUS413

    Logistics and Operations

    This course introduces students to technical tools and skills essential for problem solving and decision-making in logistics and operations management. Topics may include inventory optimization, network planning, demand forecasting, transportation planning, and productions planning. Mastery of quantitative methods using spreadsheet modeling is required for all students.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • BUS110 Business Statistics
  • MTH110 Elementary Statistics
  • PSY213 Statistics and Research Design
  • 3

    BUS416

    Computer Networking & Telecommunication

    This course introduces students to the foundational network technologies for data encoding and transmission. Topics may include telephone network and internet architecture, communication protocols (e.g., HTTP, SMTP), transport protocols (e.g., UDP, TCP), and network protocols (IP), TCP/IP, LANs, WANs, circuit vs. packet switching, network security, and multimedia.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • BUS171 Information Systems and Operations
  • 3

    BUS421

    Information and Cybersecurity

    This course introduces fundamental issues in information and cybersecurity, with an emphasis on vulnerabilities available to cyber attackers. Students develop conceptual tools for identifying vulnerabilities, assessing threats, analyzing risk, and selecting controls to mitigate risk, and practical skills in implementing security, responding to incidents, and designing systems that prevent cyberattacks.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • BUS171 Information Systems and Operations
  • 3

    BUS423

    Continuous Improvement Project Course

    Students will advance their knowledge and application in the form of a continuous improvement project. The project will apply to a process (or processes) with a designated client. Students will work independently with stakeholders of the given process to make improvements using continuous improvement methodologies.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • BUS413 Logistics and Operations
  • BUS301 Introduction to Six Sigma
  • 3

    BUS445

    Marketing Strategy

    This course examines the concepts and processes for gaining competitive advantage in the marketplace. It is designed around a marketing planning approach with an emphasis on strategic analysis and planning. The course takes a hands-on approach toward analyzing markets and market behavior, and matching strategies to changing market conditions.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • BUS243 Principles of Marketing
  • BUS243W Principles of Marketing
  • 3

    BUS450

    Advanced Database 

    This course examines advanced topics of database management, including system architecture, complex database objects, building database applications, designing data warehouses, and creating database infrastructure to support Big Data analytics. Students gain hands-on experience through the implementation of database systems, including storage management, query processing, transaction management, and security management.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • CMP283 Database Management Systems
  • 3

    BUS452

    Managing Nonprofit Organizations

    Through the use of case studies, assignments, and class projects, this course familiarizes students with the distinctiveness of nonprofit organizations and their management. Specific topics include marketing and fund raising, budgeting, personnel management and supervision, strategic planning and implementation, environmental and program evaluation, and managing interorganizational networks.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • BUS105 Foundations of Business
  • Complete all 2 of the following courses:
  • SWK102 Introduction to Social Work, Social Justice and Social Issues
  • SWK101 Introduction to Sociology
  • 3

    BUS462

    Global Procurement

    In this course, students examine success factors, ethical challenges, legal issues, and managerial implications of global procurement. Students also develop a deep understanding of the impact of procurement on quality, cost, and efficiency of supply chain management through use of procurement tools, techniques, and methodologies.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • BUS105 Foundations of Business
  • 3

    BUS490

    Integrative Capstone

    The integrative capstone, undertaken by the student during the senior year, is an extended project that helps the student complete their transition from an undergraduate student to a world-ready professional. The study usually centers on the student's major and may be conducted, at least in part, in the context of a group experience. Such programs are crafted to meet the unique needs of each major, and could include, for example, fieldwork, theater production, creative work in the arts, independent research, or independent readings. The integrative capstone in an interdisciplinary major must have the approval of both academic programs.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • BUS312W Marketing Research
  • BUS310W Business Analytics: Research Methods
  • 3

    BUS493

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    BUS496

    Digital Marketing

    This course explores digital platforms that transform marketing, including the Internet, search engines, online advertising platforms, and digital analytics platforms. Through participation in real or simulated digital marketing projects, the student will critically apply principles of advertising, marketing analytics, and research methods.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • BUS171 Information Systems and Operations
  • Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • BUS243 Principles of Marketing
  • BUS243W Principles of Marketing
  • 3

    BUS498

    Tutorial: Capstone Research Project

    Tutorial: Capstone Research Project

    4

    BUS499

    Tutorial: Capstone Research Project

    Tutorial: Capstone Research Project

    4

    BUS506

    Statistic Essentials

    This course examines the fundamentals of research and quantitative methodology with emphasis on statistical analysis by business. Topics include statistical measures and distributions, application of probability to statistical inference, experimental design, hypothesis testing, linear correlation, and statistical quality control. Focus is on business applications of statistics using problems and case studies.

    2

    BUS508

    Marketing Essentials

    This course will introduce student to marketing concepts relevant in any sector of business. Topics will include market analysis, product strategy, the marketing mix, and managing the marketing program. Course material will be resented through online discussion, collaborative activities, assigned readings, and team creation of a comprehensive marketing plan.

    2

    BUS509

    Economics Essentials

    The introduction to market analysis examines the major areas of study within microeconomics and macroeconomics and teaches students to apply the basic tools of economic analysis to policy and business decision making. Topics include supply and demand, production functions, cost, market structure, inflation, unemployment and economic growth.

    2

    BUS511

    Health Policy & Advocacy

    Analyze and synthesize innovative approaches to issues in health care delivery at all levels. Politics, policy, market forces, and advocacy are used to assess how system approaches affect health care delivery. Transformational leadership for political and policy activism are emphasized, while exploring regional, national, and global health issues and trends.

    3

    BUS513

    Logistics and Operations

    This course introduces students to technical tools and skills essential for problem solving and decision-making in logistics and operations management. Topics may include inventory optimization, network planning, demand forecasting, transportation planning, and productions planning. Mastery of quantitative methods using spreadsheet modeling is required for all students.

    3

    BUS540

    Leadership for Change in Healthcare Organizations

    Focuses on the needs of health care leaders to take health care delivery into the future through innovative initiatives. Includes: variables impacting health care delivery systems; reimbursement and funding for design change; managing competition; creating the health care delivery system of the future; and managing human and financial resources.

    3

    BUS550

    Innovation and Commercialization

    This course focuses on how to successfully commercialize an innovation. Understanding commercialization activities such as pre-product launch planning, market testing, actual product launch, and post-launch follow-up is a major part of the course. The course provides a run-through of the complete cycle from idea to market entry.

    3

    BUS551

    Informatics in Healthcare

    This course is designed to assist the student in understanding the various database systems used within a healthcare setting. Key to this course is understanding how healthcare professionals can collect and extract data from database systems to assess the organizations performance and impact on patient outcomes.

    3

    BUS552

    Managing Non-Profit Organizations

    Through the use of case studies, assignments, and class projects, this course familiarizes students with the distinctiveness of nonprofit organizations and their management. Specific topics include marketing and fund raising, budgeting, personnel management and supervision, strategic planning and implementation, environmental and program evaluation, and managing interorganizational networks.

    3

    BUS562

    Global Procurement

    In this course, students examine success factors, ethical challenges, legal issues, and managerial implications of global procurement. Students also develop a deep understanding of the impact of procurement on quality, cost, and efficiency of supply chain management through use of procurement tools, techniques, and methodologies.

    3

    BUS570

    Global Business

    This course introduces students to international business and management by studying cultural influences, government, and business structures in our global economy. Students also learn about trade relations, international finance and legal and labor agreements. Also covered, are topics on information needs, production systems, marketing and promotion, and career planning.

    3

    BUS571

    Business Communication

    This course targets key aspects of business communication: persuasive presentation skills, writing skills and listening skills. Students will be more effective in "selling" ideas to others, developing a more effective and adaptable communication strategy, and aligning objectives with those of the audience.

    3

    BUS572

    Global Marketing

    2

    BUS573

    Strategy and Entrepreneurship

    The course requires the student to take the Chief Executive Officer's (CEO) perspective and consider strategies to develop resources and capabilities needed to gain and sustain competitive advantage for both established firms and entrepreneurial ventures. Strategic analyses employed in this course critically examine the direction and goals of an organization, the social, political, technological, economic, and global factors in the business environment, industry structure, market dynamics, and firm strengths and weaknesses. The skills to develop and successfully implement strategy in different types of firms across industries are refined through case analyses and simulations, with a particular emphasis on entrepreneurship.

    3

    BUS574

    Corporate Finance

    This course deepens an understanding of financial analysis tools and concepts. Students will learn how and when to use the financial-analytical tools required to make effective business and policy decision. Functional areas addressed are assessing financial health, planning financial performance, interpretation of data and recommendations, supply-chain management.

    3

    BUS574PLA

    Corporate Finance - Prior Learning

    3

    BUS575

    Leading Organizations and Projects

    The course cultivates the student's executive leadership potential for organizational development and transformation, with specific applications to the project management environment. Theoretical perspective and case analyses will explore topics of leading one's self, motivating project teams, change management, and transforming the organization.

    3

    BUS575

    Leading Organizations and Projects

    Leading Organizations and Projects

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    BUS576

    Sustainable Human Capital

    Cultivate theoretical understanding and ethical and practical skills for managing human capital. Explore individual, group, and organizational levels of analysis focusing on topics of motivation, communication, group dynamics, decision making, culture, power, and politics. Analyze the effectiveness of tools for talent acquisition and development, such as compensation, feedback, and assessment.

    3

    BUS577

    Information Systems and Analytics

    This course explores the strategic management of technology, information, and people from a Chief Information Officer's (CIO) perspective. The business value and organizational challenges of enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems, customer relationship management (CRM) systems, data warehouses, analytics, and Big Data are critically examined through cases and hands-on projects.

    3

    BUS580

    Business Ethics and Corporate Responsibility

    This course provides an intellectual framework in which to consider the ways society and organizations affect an individual's and corporation's ethical decision making. Students apply ethical decision tools to the numerous moral challenges confronting them in their professional careers. The global context of ethical decision making is examined.

    2

    BUS582

    Foundations of Project Management

    This course explores the knowledge areas and project stages from the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK). Students acquire concepts and skills in initiating, planning, executing, monitoring, controlling, and closing projects. The course examines the management of project integration, scope, time, cost, human resources, communications, risk, and procurement.

    3

    BUS607

    Human Resource Management and Issues of Diversity

    In this course the student will develop conceptual, ethical, and practical skills for managing people through the understanding of, and effective use of HR systems including compensation packages, feedback loops, assessment measures etc. In addition, ethical, legal and strategic issues concerning diversity, international HR challenges as well as domestic situations will be examined.

    2

    BUS608

    Economics for Managers

    The goal of this course is to provide students with the tools and concepts from managerial economics that practicing managers can and do use. Drawing on issues in both microeconomics and macroeconomics, fundamental principles are applied to business decision-making.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • BUS509 Economics Essentials
  • 2

    BUS609

    Business and Sustainability

    This course covers basic questions concerning sustainability and the challenges in reconciling free-market capitalism with the need for more sustainable business practices. Among topics covered will be: the need to translate real-world sustainability challenges into future business opportunities, and the economic moral challenges involved with the creation of a sustainable world.

    2

    BUS610

    Statistical Application to Business Efficiency

    This course is designed to expose students to the essential concepts and methodologies of business improvement techniques used to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of business operations, increase profitability, eliminate waste, and reduce costs. Quality management principles including continuous process improvement, Six Sigma, and lean manufacturing/service will be introduced.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • BUS506 Statistic Essentials
  • 2

    BUS611

    Healthcare Quality Measurement

    This 3 credit course will address the quality of healthcare in the United States. Key issues relating to quality of care will be analyzed from the perspectives of health care systems, providers, patients and payers. The course will also address the various methods of assessment and quality control for patient care. Students will learn to understand and apply the science of studying and measuring the flow of work in providing patient care. Methods of Quality Control (including QA/QC, Deming and TQM) will be covered in detail. Substantive case analyses will add depth to the course.

    3

    BUS612

    Healthcare Economics and Reimbursement

    This course applies microeconomic principles to analyze the drivers of healthcare behavior, the supply and demand for healthcare services, and the impact of insurance on the demand for healthcare services and the role of government in healthcare markets.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 2 of the following courses:
  • BUS506 Statistic Essentials
  • BUS509 Economics Essentials
  • 2

    BUS613

    Health Policy and History

    This course will provide an introduction to the history, structure and current issues in the United States' health care system. The interrelationships of the major stakeholders in the system, including providers, patients and payers, will be examined in detail. Particular attention will be given to the influence of legislative bodies, lobbyists and regulatory agencies.

    2

    BUS618

    Economics for Managers

    This course teaches how economic tools and techniques can be used to solve business problems. Economics describes why firms do what they do and points to business strategies. The course focuses on economic applications. The course provides an understanding of how economics influences marketing, management, and other business-related decisions.

    3

    BUS623

    Strategic Performance for Executives

    Strategic Performance for Executives

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    BUS623

    Strategic Performance for Executives

    This course will cover issues specific to business leaders such as conflict management, negotiation and persuasion, mentoring structures, crisis communication, and organizational change. Other topics will include implicit and explicit attitude toward authority in the workplace; implicit social cognition; attitudes, self-esteem, and stereotypes, etc.

    3

    BUS639

    Sustainability and Assessment Reporting

    An in-depth study of how to measure, track, and report on sustainability issues in a business. Includes a study of how to create effective Social Responsibility reports and the standards currently used to measure sustainability. Teaches students how to monitor and measure sustainability issues from within a business.

    3

    BUS641

    Sustainable Supply Chain Management

    This course provides students with an understanding of how supply chain works, how and where along the supply chain sustainability questions should be addressed/considered, and the impacts of those decisions on stakeholders further down the chain. Topics include: packaging, transportation, energy use, and waste.

    3

    BUS643

    International Field Experience

    MBA students attain firsthand understanding of the markets and corporate settings of foreign countries through supervised experience, observation, interaction and research/analysis. This course provides that critical knowledge with a ten day study abroad field experience. While not required for graduation, BUS 643 is highly recommended. Additional Fee(s): Travel fee.

    3

    BUS652

    Managerial Accounting

    This course examines accounting information that is used in managerial decision making within the organization. Focus is on interpretation of financial statements, cost accounting, financial planning and analysis, the development of internal controls, and constructing budgets.

    3

    BUS661

    Logistics and Operations

    logistics and operations

    3

    BUS662

    Global Procurement

    Global Procurement

    3

    BUS671

    Marketing Management

    This course takes the Chief Marketing Officer’s (CMO) perspective to explore marketing as a core business practice. Discussions focus on theories and principles for interfacing with customers, competitors, partners, and the external environment. Concepts are applied to planning and executing the conception, pricing, promotion, and distribution of goods and services.

    3

    BUS672

    Corporate Finance

    This course deepens an understanding of financial analysis tools and concepts. Students will learn how and when to use the financial-analytical tools required to make effective business and policy decision. Functional areas addressed are assessing financial health, planning financial performance, interpretation of data and recommendations, supply-chain management.

    3

    BUS673

    Legal Aspects of Business

    This course introduces business law and the legal system in preparation for dealing with legal business issues and attorneys. Topics include civil procedure, torts, strict liability, legal fees and case management, common law contracts, the Uniform Commercial Code, partnerships, corporate law, estates and trusts, secured transactions, third-party rights, property, insurance, securities law, and ethics.

    3

    BUS680

    Complex Issues in Project Management

    Case studies and simulations engage students in the examination of complex issues in project management, such as control, portfolio management, and rescuing failing projects. The Student will be able to analyze, evaluate, and optimize projects in specific environments and industries.

    3

    BUS691

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 1

    BUS692

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 2

    BUS698

    Strategy and Entrepreneurship

    "Develop strategies to gain and sustain competitive advantage. Examine the goals of an organization, the social, political, technological, economic, and global factors in the business environment, industry structure, market dynamics, and firm strengths and weaknesses. Develop and implement strategy across industries, and as an entrepreneur, through case analyses and simulations. "

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • BUS671 Marketing Management
  • 3

    BUS699

    Business Consulting Capstone

    This course is the culminating experience in the MBA program. Students apply professional-level business consulting skills learned in the MBA program. Business Consulting Capstone student teams solve business problems for businesses and entrepreneurs.

    3

    CHM102

    Chemistry in Context

    One semester lecture course with selected topics in inorganic and organic chemistry. Emphasis is on relevance to biological and environmental issues. Topics include matter, energy, atomic and molecular structure, bonding, reaction chemistry, and radioactivity. Three hours of lecture per week. Not open to majors in biology or chemistry.

    3

    CHM102L

    Chemistry in Context Lab

    One semester laboratory course to accompany CHM102 Chemistry in Context. Two hours of lab per week. Not open to majors in biology or chemistry.

    1

    CHM105

    General Chemistry

    This class covers the same material as Chemistry 107 below, but is specifically structured for students who have had little or no previous chemistry experience, or who need extra help with algebraic problem solving. Three hours of lecture and one hour of recitation per week. Co-requisite: CHM 109

    3

    CHM107

    Chemistry I

    This class begins with a study of atomic structure, then expands to cover chemical naming, patterns of reactivity, thermochemistry, the interaction of light and matter, atomic orbitals, ionic and covalent bonding, and molecular shapes. This class concludes with an introduction to organic chemistry and biochemistry. Three hours of lecture per week. Co-requisite: CHM 109

    3

    CHM108

    Chemistry II

    The second semester of general chemistry continues exploring the structure, properties, and bonding of atoms and molecules, with emphasis on the physical characteristics of gases, liquids, solids and solutions, chemical equilibria, thermodynamics, and kinetics. Three hours of lecture per week.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • CHM105 General Chemistry
  • CHM107 Chemistry I
  • 3

    CHM109L

    Chemistry I Laboratory

    Introduction to the basic experimental procedures and laboratory techniques in chemistry. Experiments are correlated with the lectures in Chemistry 105 and Chemistry 107. Three hours of laboratory per week. Corequisite: CHM 105 or 107. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fee.

    Co-requisites

    1

    CHM110L

    Chemistry II Laboratory

    Continued introduction to the basic experimental procedures and laboratory techniques in chemistry. Experiments are correlated with lectures in Chemistry 108. Three hours of laboratory per week. Corequisite: CHM 108. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fee.

    1

    CHM205

    Organic Chemistry I

    Development of the structural theory of organic compounds. Relationship of structure to reactivity, stereochemistry, types of organic reactive intermediates, and the chemistry of alkanes, alkenes, and aromatic compounds are covered. Three hours of lecture per week. Co-requisite: CHM 215.

    3

    CHM206

    Organic Chemistry II

    Discussion of organic functional groups and their chemistry. Spectroscopy, mechanisms, and synthetic type-reactions are included. A discussion of biologically important compounds is covered during the last third of the term.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 2 of the following courses:
  • CHM205 Organic Chemistry I
  • CHM215L Elementary Organic Laboratory
  • 3

    CHM209

    Inorganic Chemistry

    A descriptive survey of inorganic chemistry, including bonding theories, coordination compounds, electrochemistry, inorganic syntheses, and the chemistry of the transition metals. Three hours of lecture per week.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • CHM108 Chemistry II
  • 3

    CHM215L

    Elementary Organic Laboratory

    Basic manipulative skills, including introduction to several chromatographic techniques, are followed by chemistry of alkenes and aromatic compounds. Four hours of laboratory per week. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fee.

    2

    CHM216L

    Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    Chemistry of organic functional groups. Identification of unknowns and a multistep synthesis. Four hours of laboratory per week. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • CHM215L Elementary Organic Laboratory
  • 2

    CHM311

    Physical Chemistry I

    Thermodynamic descriptions of chemical systems, emphasizing gases and solutions. Phase transitions and phase equilibria, chemical equilibria, kinetics, and electrochemistry. Three hours of lecture per week.

    3

    CHM312

    Physical Chemistry II

    Quantum mechanics, spectroscopy, introduction to symmetry, and introduction to statistical mechanics. Four hour lectures per week.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • CHM311 Physical Chemistry I
  • 4

    CHM317LW

    Integrated Chemistry Laboratory

    Experiments are selected to illustrate important principles of advanced experimental chemistry and familiarize students with important experimental methods. The course is intended to encourage students to think critically about the reliability of their experimental results in the light of their previous chemistry experience. Five hours of laboratory per week. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fee.

    2

    CHM317W

    Integrated Chemistry Lab

    Experiments are selected to illustrate important principles of advanced experimental chemistry and familiarize students with important experimental methods. The course is intended to encourage students to think critically about the reliability of their experimental results in the light of their previous chemistry experience. Five hours of laboratory per week. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fee.

    2

    CHM318L

    Chemical Analysis Laboratory

    This laboratory teaches the proper design, implementation and analysis of modern techniques in instrumental chemistry, encompassing spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and separation science. In addition, several inorganic compounds are synthesized and characterized. Student-originated research projects are used extensively throughout this course. Seven hours of laboratory per week. Cross-listed as BIO418. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • CHM216L Organic Chemistry Laboratory
  • 3

    CHM322

    Topics in Analytical Chemistry

    This course explores the fundamental chemical principles underlying modern chemical instrumentation. Students learn the advantages and limitations of these instruments, how to select the proper instrumental configuration for a specific experiment, and how to evaluate emerging chemical technologies. Three hours of lecture per week. Corequisite: CHM 318

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • CHM215L Elementary Organic Laboratory
  • Co-requisites

    • CHM318L Chemical Analysis Laboratory
    3

    CHM338

    Biochemistry I

    This course covers the structure and functions of proteins, polynucleic acids, and biological membranes. Enzymes and kinetics are taught. Metabolic pathways, with emphasis on the thermodynamics of the equilibria and the storage and usage of energy, are covered. Three hours of lecture per week.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • CHM206 Organic Chemistry II
  • Co-requisites

    3

    CHM339

    Biochemistry II

    Metabolism is studied with an emphasis on anabolic pathways and special pathways such as cytochrome P450. Other topics include molecular genetics and protein synthesis, hormones and receptors, and immunology. Three hours of lecture per week. Cross-listed as BIO438

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • CHM338 Biochemistry I
  • 3

    CHM340L

    Macromolecule Laboratory

    An advanced laboratory course for junior and senior science majors who wish to gain theoretical and practical experience with the techniques and equipment commonly used in the fields of cellular biology, molecular biology, and biochemistry. Topics include PCR, electrophoresis, enzyme kinetics, aseptic cell and tissue culture, cell surface receptors, and molecular modeling. Five-hour laboratory with one-hour pre-lab lecture each week. Cross-listed as BIO. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • CHM338 Biochemistry I
  • 2

    CHM340LW

    Macromolecule Laboratory

    An advanced laboratory course for junior and senior science majors who wish to gain theoretical and practical experience with the techniques and equipment commonly used in the fields of cellular biology, molecular biology, and biochemistry. Topics include PCR, electrophoresis, enzyme kinetics, aseptic cell and tissue culture, cell surface receptors, and molecular modeling. Five-hour laboratory with one-hour pre-lab lecture each week. Cross-listed as BIO 440. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fee.

    2

    CHM343

    Environmental Chemistry

    This course is an advanced study of the chemical principles underlying common environmental problems. It aims to deepen the student's knowledge of chemistry and its role in the environment and shows the power of chemistry as a tool to help us comprehend the changing world around us. Cross-listed as ENV 443. Three hour lecture per week.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • CHM205 Organic Chemistry I
  • CHM206 Organic Chemistry II
  • CHM209 Inorganic Chemistry
  • CHM215L Elementary Organic Laboratory
  • CHM216L Organic Chemistry Laboratory
  • 3

    CHM443

    Environmental Chemistry

    This course is an advanced study of the chemical principles underlying common environmental problems. It aims to deepen the student's knowledge of chemistry and its role in the environment and shows the power of chemistry as a tool to help us comprehend the changing world around us. Three hours of lecture per week. Cross-listed as ENV 443.

    3

    CHM490

    Integrative Capstone

    The integrative capstone, undertaken by the student during the senior year, is an extended project that helps the student complete their transition from an undergraduate student to a world-ready professional. The study usually centers on the student's major and may be conducted, at least in part, in the context of a group experience. Such programs are crafted to meet the unique needs of each major, and could include, for example, fieldwork, theater production, creative work in the arts, independent research, or independent readings. The integrative capstone in an interdisciplinary major must have the approval of both academic programs.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • IND350 Scientific Research Methods
  • 3

    CHM491

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 1

    CHM492

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 2

    CHM493

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    CHM498

    Tutorial: Chemistry

    Tutorial: Chemistry

    4

    CHM499

    Tutorial: Chemistry

    Tutorial: Chemistry

    4

    CHM503

    Introduction to Green Chemistry

    Green chemistry was defined by Paul Anastas in the 1990s as "the design of chemical products and processes that reduce or eliminate the use and generation of hazardous compounds." Stated broadly, this course helps students understand the notion of sustainability and how it applies to chemistry. It also explores the history of chemistry, outlines the critical need for green chemistry, and explores the principles that guide its practice.

    3

    CHM515

    Life-Cycle Assessment

    Study of objective processes used to evaluate the environmental burdens associated with a product, process, or activity. This involves identifying energy, materials, and wastes in order to evaluate and implement opportunities to affect environmental improvements. Material and energy flow analyses (e.g., mass balancing) are covered for a variety of scales, such as an individual business, industrial sector, or an entire economy.

    3

    CHM516

    Chemical Process Principles

    Fundamental concepts of chemical engineering; problem-solving techniques; applications to the environment and sustainability of stoichiometry, material and energy balances, and phase equilibria; bioprocesses and how to make things from renewable resources.

    3

    CHM520

    Internship

    INTERNSHIP

    1

    CHM543

    Advanced Environmental Chemistry

    This course is an advanced study of the chemical principles underlying common environmental problems. It aims to deepen the student's knowledge of chemistry and it's role in the environment.

    3

    CHM607

    Catalysis

    Catalysis lies at the heart of many chemical processes, from the academic research lab through living systems to the industrial large-scale reactor. By understanding and careful use of catalysis many processes can be made faster, cleaner and more sustainable. This course will provide training in the state-of-the-art of catalysis theory, application, preparation and analysis.

    3

    CHM692

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    2

    CHM698

    Green Chemistry Practices I-Industrial Challenges

    In the first of this two-course sequence a series of professionals from the region are invited to present to the class. These presentations will present problems/projects being addressed by local industry. Groups of students will choose one, design a protocol to follow, and present their protocol to the class.

    3

    CHM699

    Green Chemistry Practices II-Industrial Solutions

    The second part of a two-course sequence; students will complete a project they propose in CHM698 in conjunction with a local industry/business.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • CHM698 Green Chemistry Practices I-Industrial Challenges
  • 3

    CIS325RU

    Systems Analysis and Design

    OCICU course taught at Regis University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    CIS455RU

    Management Information Systems

    OCICU course taught at Regis University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    CMP120

    Introduction to Programming

    An introduction to the theory and practice of computer programming with an emphasis on problem solving. No previous programming experience is required.

    3

    CMP150

    On-line Genealogy

    This course is an introductory study of all aspects of personal and family history, and genealogical research, with a strong emphasis on computer search engines. Methods used to identify individuals and their ancestors will be surveyed, emphasizing the scientific approach to genealogical research, rather than chance.

    3

    CMP202

    Introduction to Programming

    An introduction to programming using C++ for students with no previous computer programming experience. Includes introduction to algorithms and object-oriented programming techniques.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • CMP140 Introduction to Computer Science
  • 3

    CMP283

    Database Management Systems

    This course is a study of database management systems and their applications to a wide range of information processing needs. Students design and implement database management systems while being introduced to a conceptual model of a database environment comprised of five basic components: databases, database management systems, data dictionary/directory systems, database administration, and user-system interfaces.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • CMP202 Introduction to Programming
  • CMP120 Introduction to Programming
  • 3

    COM101

    Foundations Of Human Communication

    A survey of the discipline of communication studies with emphasis on multiple theoretical, and methodological issues relevant to the systematic inquiry and pursuit of knowledge about human communication. This course explores the basic history, assumption, principles, processes, variables, methods, and specialization of human communication as an academic field of study.

    3

    COM106

    Media and Society

    The effects of mass communication on individuals and society, particularly as they relate to values and ethics, are examined. The course emphasizes the history and structure of the mass media.

    3

    COM141

    Media Literacy

    This course introduces students to the Macintosh computer interface and related media practices. Students explore digital foundations, media related histories, theoretical frameworks and critical examination of production elements as they discover how computers are radically changing the way image makers create and present their work. Cross-listed as ART141 and FDT141. Additional Fee(s): Course Computing fee.

    3

    COM142

    Photography I : Black and White Darkroom

    This course is designed to introduce students to black and white darkroom photography. Students build on camera skills while investigating 35mm film fundamentals and wet lab methods. They will study exposure and printing in the black and white darkroom. A range of photographic materials, analog processes, and techniques will be covered. Students will study the photograph as a medium for documentation, representation, and expression. Cross-listed as ART 142. Additional Fee(s): Applied laboratory fee.

    3

    COM150

    Introduction to Digital Video Production

    This course introduces the tools, technology, and techniques of digital video production. Students plan, script, manage, and produce videos using digital technologies. Along with the technical application, students will be exposed to the history of video as an artistic and instructional medium, as well as the relationship of digital video to film and television. The theoretical focus is on critiques of narrative construction. Cross-listed as FDT/COM 150. Additional Fee(s): Applied art fee.

    3

    COM151

    Introduction to Reporting

    This course covers the fundamentals of reporting and includes identifying different types of news sources, properly quoting interviewees, and orientation to basic media ethics, differentiating between opinion and analysis, confirming facts in the course of reporting, and finally writing skills.

    3

    COM152

    Photography II - Introduction to Digital Photography

    This course introduces students to the basic aesthetic grammar of digital photography and provides a historical and critical context for looking at and making photographs. Students will use their own digital cameras with manually adjustable focus, exposure manipulation, photo finishing techniques and printing processes. They will also learn the fundamentals of digital capture and will utilize Adobe Bridge and Lightroom software for file processing, management, and output. Cross-listed as ART 152.Additional Fee(s): Applied art fee.

    3

    COM209

    Intercultural Communication: Values and Ethics

    Course will provide the student with an appreciation of the complexities involved in the development of beliefs, attitudes and behaviors that reflect cultural values. This course will provide an understanding of the specific forces, which shape perceptions, feelings and behaviors of various cultural groups. These forces include socially constructed categories such as race, ethnicity, nationality, gender, socio-economic status, and religion. These will be explored in a variety of contexts, language, family structures and the handling of conflict of laws and ethics (cultural relativism) will be examined.

    3

    COM213

    Special Topics in Communications

    Special Topics in Communications

    3

    COM234

    Persuasion

    This course explores rhetorical and experimental studies of persuasion. It introduces the student to research in the field and critically examines some of the techniques developed in "selling" products, politics, and culture. It also examines the ethical considerations relevant to these techniques.

    3

    COM234W

    Persuasion

    This course explores rhetorical and experimental studies of persuasion. It introduces the student to research in the field and critically examines some of the techniques developed in "selling" products, politics, and culture. It also examines the ethical considerations relevant to these techniques.

    3

    COM245

    Design Praxis

    This course introduces the concepts of visual perception. Theories on the 'way we see', how information is interpreted through light and how it includes physiology and cognitive perception. This course also explores the relevance of symbols and archetypes in broadening ones perceptual skills. The aim of this course is broaden and deepen student's visual and verbal skills in critical thinking, the creative process and problem solving.

    3

    COM247

    Photography III - Advanced Digital Imaging

    This course introduces students to computer tools that manipulate and enhance digital images. Students learn the skills to enhance varied input in order to create high-quality digital output utilizing Photoshop the industry standard for digital image manipulation. Emphasis is placed on the fundamentals of the interface, understanding resolution, drawing and painting, masking, layering/compositing, color correction and retouching. Cross-listed as ART 247. Additional Fee(s): Applied laboratory fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • COM141 Media Literacy
  • ART141 Media Literacy
  • FDT141 Media Literacy
  • 3

    COM250

    Introduction to Digital Video Production

    Introduction to Digital Video Production

    3

    COM251

    News Writing and Editing

    This production based course introduces students to reporting, structuring and writing print news stories. Students are assigned to cover weekly events and topics in the Pittsburgh area, thus gaining a sense of how news judgment and media ethics are applied to actual reporting assignments.

    3

    COM251L

    Communique Lab

    A one-credit pass-fail lab section attached to COM 251: Newswriting and Editing. Credit will be awarded upon a student's fulfillment of a staff position on The Communiqué over the course of one semester. A student may register for this lab a maximum of three times during her undergraduate years.

    1

    COM255

    The Communique Newsroom I

    This PRO course is designed to give students hands-on training in the various roles that work together to make a multiplatform newsroom function by fulfilling a staff position with the Communiqué. Students will develop skills related to developing/pitching story ideas, beat reporting, story budgets, print newspaper design and digital journalism.

    3

    COM260W

    Practical Public Relations

    Students learn the theories, processes, and techniques involved in planning and implementing programs designed to influence public opinion and behavior through socially responsible performance and mutually satisfactory communication. The course emphasizes research, design, production, and writing public relations media, including news releases, features, pamphlets, brochures, financial statements, management reports, scripts, scenarios, and publicity. Students will analyze case histories presented by professional practitioners; appraise success and failure factors; and explore new concepts and developing trends.

    3

    COM261

    Web Design I: Code + Aesthetics

    This introductory course in web design and net art production addresses formal design, aesthetic, conceptual and theoretical methods for the creative production and dissemination of student projects via a global network. Technical focus is on authoring nonlinear documents using software and basic web programming languages. Students conceptualize projects around a variety of topics including: online social networks, memory and database theory, cultural interfaces, the screen and the body, and collective media. Cross-listed as FDT261. Additional Fee(s): Course Computing Fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • COM141 Media Literacy
  • 3

    COM310W

    Environmental Communication

    This writing-intensive course provides an overview of contemporary environmental communication theory, practice, and criticism. Students interrogate topics such as the meaning of "green" or "sustainable," social justice and environmental advocacy, and public participation in environmental decision-making.

    3

    COM313

    Special Topics

    Special Topics

    3

    COM320SLU

    Systems Analysis and Design

    OCICU course taught at Saint Leo University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    COM321

    Typography Design Studio

    This class is an introduction to the concrete and conceptual aspects of typography as a visual medium. The first half of the semester will deal with the technique requirements of typography (micro typography). The second half will deal with abstract compositional uses for typography (macro typography), integrating hand skills and computer as way to render type. Historical and current forms of alphabetic communications will be explored, along with the relationship to contemporary image-based communication.

    3

    COM330SLU

    Database Concepts and Programming

    OCICU course taught at Saint Leo University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    COM350

    Intermediate Digital Video

    Students will utilize the nonlinear editing software program Final Cut Pro to examine methods of production and related theories involved in achieving structure in film and video. By conceptually dissecting and practically applying techniques such as splicing, transitional effects, and other editing processes, students will render sophisticated projects which are conscious of how the edit structures film and by doing so becomes another creative and technical layer for study.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • ART150 Introduction to Digital Video Production
  • COM150 Introduction to Digital Video Production
  • FDT150 Introduction to Digital Video Production
  • 3

    COM351

    Advanced News Writing and Editing

    This course emphasizes the "how to" of interviewing, researching, writing, and placing professional quality articles for a full range of magazines and newspapers, including women’s, sports, ethnic, local, and national publications. Analyses of the skills and background needed to report on the various topics. The following topics may be covered, depending on student interest: science, medicine, and environment writing; sports news and feature coverage, including social and economic factors influencing sports in America; business, including economics and finance; entertainment and arts, including television, film, theatre, music, graphic arts, architecture, and design; and government, covering local, state, and federal government. Students also concentrate on Reporting Pittsburgh, where they will focus on Pittsburgh and be required to do intensive field work in the neighborhoods, ethnic communities, and local institutions such as City Council, hospitals, police departments, and social work agencies.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • COM251 News Writing and Editing
  • 3

    COM351L

    Staff Position: The Communiqué

    Pass-fail lab section attached to COM351: Advanced Newswriting and Editing. Credit will be awarded upon students fulfillment of a staff position on the Communique over the course of the semester. A student may register for this lab or COM251L a maximum of three times during her undergraduate year.

    1

    COM353

    Print Design

    This course combines technical training in digital imaging with exercises in creative print-media based design and critical thinking. Students learn conceptual and technical differences between analog and digital imaging and work with a range of digital tools, including QuarkXpress, Adobe InDesign, and Photoshop. Conceptual and content discourses will be developed through contemporary issues and the design of relevant documents. Cross-listed as ART 353. Additional Fee(s): Applied art fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • ART141 Media Literacy
  • COM141 Media Literacy
  • FDT141 Media Literacy
  • 3

    COM355

    Organizational Communication

    Organizational Communication will focus on five theoretical approaches to the study of communication in organizations. Those approaches are: classical, human relations/human resources, systems, cultural, and critical, with most time spent on the final theoretical perspective. Additionally, the course will examine how communication affects the gendered nature of the workplace.

    3

    COM358

    Photography IV: Studio and Lighting Techniques

    Building upon skills learned in previous Photography classes, this foundation course introduces lighting principles in the studio and on location. Assignments include still life and studio and location portraiture. Basic view camera techniques and hand held light meters are introduced. Course focuses on the use of Black-and-White output. Fine art and commercial applications are equally emphasized.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • COM241 Lighting Principles
  • 3

    COM360

    Advanced Public Relations

    Application of principles and methods to intensive analysis of public relations problems, decision making, programming, and evaluation in simulated staff and agency organization. The course emphasizes the principles and practices of public relations as a basic component in the promotion and marketing of goods and services; regulatory considerations; and consumerism. The following topics may be covered, depending on student interest: public relations in entertainment, including films, broadcasting, music, expositions, amusement parks, resorts, and arenas; developing, managing, and evaluating campaigns designed to reach niche audiences segmented by culture, lifestyle, and other factors; and sports information and promotion, including lectures, media assignments, role-playing, and presentations by sports professionals.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • COM260W Practical Public Relations
  • COM260 Practical Public Relations
  • 3

    COM365

    Visual Communication

    This course introduces students to the process of developing a Visual Communication system with a special focus on non profit branding. An understanding of branding strategies are researched, explored and implemented to help serve the needs of growing community-based non-profits. Visual Identities are created for existing small non-profits to address their needs as well as strengthen their position in the marketplace and community.

    3

    COM374

    Photography V - Documentary and Photojournalism

    This course will focus on photojournalistic practice and/or a focused exploration of a specific issue in the news. Students will analyze news topics from a practical, ethical, and visual perspective, to produce images that tell stories for newspapers, magazines, books and the Internet. Students will also be introduced to a wide range of approaches and styles of documentary photography with an emphasis on meaning and point of view. Cross-listed with ART374. Additional Fee(s): Applied laboratory fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • ART142 Photography I : Black and White Darkroom
  • ART152 Photography II - Introduction to Digital Photography
  • 3

    COM400

    Media Ethics and Law Responsibility

    Study of current and past battles over the limits of free expression; moral and ethical issues and dilemmas and conflicts of interest; public perceptions of the press; and the interdependence of the media, economics, politics, sports, and entertainment. Media as instruments of social and esthetic change will be discussed, along with press law and government controls, and the portrayal of people of color, gender issues, sexual diversity issues, and community issues.

    3

    COM408RU

    Conflict Management

    OCICU course taught at Regis University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    COM416

    Environmental Communication

    This course provides an overview of contemporary environmental communication theory, practice, and criticism. Students interrogate topics such as the meaning of "green" or "sustainable," social justice and environmental advocacy, and public participation in environmental decision-making.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 2 of the following courses:
  • COM106 Media and Society
  • COM141 Media Literacy
  • 3

    COM450

    Advanced Digital Video Production

    Advanced Digital Video Production

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • ART350 Intermediate Digital Video Production
  • COM350 Intermediate Digital Video
  • FDT350 Intermediate Digital Video Production
  • 3

    COM452RU

    Follower-Centered Leadership

    Follower-Centered Leadership

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    COM470RU

    Decision-Making & Problem Solving

    OCICU course taught at Regis University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    COM490

    Integrative Capstone

    The integrative capstone , undertaken by the student during the senior year, is an extended project that helps the student complete their transition from an undergraduate student to a world-ready professional. The study usually centers on the student’s major and may be conducted, at least in part, in the context of a group experience. Such programs are crafted to meet the unique needs of each major, and could include, for example, fieldwork, theater production, creative work in the arts, independent research, or independent readings. The integrative capstone in an interdisciplinary major must have the approval of both academic programs.

    3

    COM492

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 2

    COM493

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    COM498

    Tutorial: Communication

    Tutorial: Communication

    4

    COM499

    Tutorial: Communication

    Tutorial: Communication

    4

    COM510

    Health Communications

    Course provides an introduction to the essential concepts and theories of health communication. Students study how individuals understand health issues and how communication processes help shape and influence our acceptance of health-related messages. Topics include health literacy, media coverage of health issues, and health risk communications.

    3

    COM515

    Environmental Communications

    Course offers an overview of environmental communications providing an analysis of how individuals, institutions and corporations describe and portray our interactions with the environment. Discussion topics include environmental discourse, environmental conflicts, risk communication, environmental disasters, environmental social movements, and the nature-society relationship.

    3

    COM518

    Strategic Communications

    Course provides an overview of concepts, tactics and skills employed in strategic internal and external communications. Students learn how to determine the communications objective(s), define the target audience(s) and stakeholders, and develop key messages to improve strategic communications.

    3

    COM525

    Communications Research and Theory

    Course provides an overview of the major theoretical and research developments in the communications discipline. The emphasis will be on the application of theory to practice and on applied research. Topics include quantitative and qualitative research methods, research ethics, and the history of development of communication theories.

    3

    COM528

    Risk and Crisis Communications

    Students acquire an understanding of crisis management and risk communication. Course topics include public opinion research, data collection and analysis, crisis and risk management theory, and communication tactics and strategies. Students develop case studies relating to their areas of professional interest.

    3

    COM550

    Organizational Communications

    Course covers current theory and research in the area of organizational communications. Includes formal and informal organizations and public and private organizations. Topics include organizational culture, employee information needs, decision making, leadership and power. Emphasis will be placed on developing the analytical tools to analyze and improve organizational communications.

    3

    COM613A

    Special Topics:

    This course will explore different special topics in professional writing.

    1

    COM613C

    Special Topics:

    This course will explore different special topics in communication.

    3

    COM625

    Communications Campaigns

    Students explore the use of communication campaigns to reduce health risks and promote public health and awareness. Course prepares students to develop, implement, and assess health campaigns. Drawing on health behavior theory and communication research and theory, students work on case studies and develop original campaigns employing multiple communication channels.

    3

    COM675

    Communication Law & Ethics

    Course provides an examination of the legal and ethical dimensions of communications. The historical development of media law is covered, although emphasis is placed on contemporary legal issues. Students explore complex ethical challenges facing media practitioners through case studies, exercises and class discussions.

    3

    COM685

    Communications Project

    This is the capstone project for all students in the Master's in Communications program. This applied learning experience builds upon previous coursework. Students develop a major project designed to meet their professional interests. The project will demonstrate mastery of the knowledge and skills gained throughout the program.

    3

    COM691

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 1

    COM693

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    COR145

    Foundations of Effective Writing

    This course is designed to provide writing support and instruction for first-year students enrolled in College Seminars. Supplemental instruction focuses on the development of writing skills necessary for successful completion of the College Seminar and applicable to other courses across the curriculum.

    1

    COR405

    Integrative Seminar

    This course is a culminating, interdisciplinary experience for the general education curriculum. Students integrate and synthesize knowledge gained from their major with knowldge gained through general education and apply their disciplinary knowldge to an issue in the areas of global understanding, environmnetal responsibility, and women's leadership. Students work in groups to research and analyze the topic of the seminar and present their findings in a public forum. Prerequisite(s): COR 304

    3

    COR491

    Foundations of Effective Writing

    This course is designed to provide writing support and instruction for first-year students enrolled in College Seminars. Supplemental instruction focuses on the development of writing skills necessary for successful completion of the College Seminar and applicable to other courses across the curriculum.

    1

    COR492

    Supplemental Instruction in Writing II

    Supplemental Instruction in Writing II

    2

    CRM101

    Introduction to Criminal Justice

    Criminology is the study of crime, its cause and effects. This course covers definitions and types of crime, research methods, theories and responses to crime. Crimes against people, property, and organizations will be examined, and biological, psychological, and sociological explanations will be discussed.

    3

    CRM220

    Women and the Criminal Justice System

    This course focuses on three aspects of women's involvement in the criminal justice system: as victims, offenders, and professionals. Coverage will include theories and facts about women offenders, the impact of crime on women victims and survivors, and special issues facing women who pursue careers in policing, corrections and law.

    3

    CRM224

    Juvenile Justice

    Examination of biological, psychological, sociological, and ecological theories of juvenile delinquency; its historical and current legal definitions and enabling legislation; statistical resources and activity patterns; and methods of prevention, control, and treatment of juvenile delinquency. Cross-listed as SWK 224.

    3

    CRM225W

    Criminology

    Criminology is the study of crime, its causes and effects. This course covers definitions and types of crime, research methods, theories of criminal behavior and responses to crime. Crimes against people, property, and organizations will be examined, and biological, psychological, and sociological explanations will be discussed.

    3

    CRM230SLU

    Introduction to Crime Scene Investigation

    OCICU course taught at Saint Leo University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    CRM305

    Criminal Investigations

    Survey of the history, theory, and practice of criminal investigations conducted by law enforcement officers and private investigators. Crime scene documentation, search and seizure, interview and interrogation, suspect identification and arrest procedures are applied to both violent and property crimes. Report writing and courtroom presentation are also covered.

    3

    CRM310

    Survey of Corrections

    This course provides both a historical and contemporary exploration of correction methods utilized in the United States. This course examines the philosophy, theory, and practices involved in the control and behavior modification of offenders. Issues of inequality and at-risk populations are explored.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • CRM101 Introduction to Criminal Justice
  • 3

    CRM313

    Special Topics

    This course allows in-depth exploration of a special topic in criminology. Possible topics include organized crime, the death penalty, victimization of children and adolescents, and media portrayals of forensics and forensic professionals.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • CRM101 Introduction to Criminal Justice
  • 3

    CRM320

    Criminalization of Mental Illness

    This course explores the intersection of the criminal justice and mental health systems. Areas of focus include: the impact of governmental policies, law changes, prevalence of mental illness among offender populations, the biopsychosocial status of offenders, and interventions that assist offenders transitioning back into society.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • CRM101 Introduction to Criminal Justice
  • PSY101 General Psychology
  • SWK101 Introduction to Sociology
  • 3

    CRM332

    History of Crime and Punishment

    This course will provide an introduction to the historical study of crime and punishment. Specifically, the course will examine definitions of crime, goals of punishment, and how these forms of crime and punishment reflect the structure of that society within that specific historical context.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • CRM101 Introduction to Criminal Justice
  • 3

    CRM340

    Violent and Predatory Crimes

    The criminology and victimology of violent and predatory crimes are explored from psychological, sociological, and biological perspectives. Serial, spree, rampage, and mass murder are covered. Students will gain increased understanding of violent and predatory criminals, their victims, social science research methods, forensic investigations, and criminal law.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • CRM101 Introduction to Criminal Justice
  • 3

    CRM362

    What is Evil?

    This course will utilize an interdisciplinary framework (criminology, sociology, psychology, history, political science) to examine definitions of "evil," motivations to commit "evil" actions, social reactions to "evil," and control of "evil."

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • CRM101 Introduction to Criminal Justice
  • PSY101 General Psychology
  • 3

    CRM490

    Integrative Capstone

    The integrative capstone, undertaken by the student during the senior year, is an extended project that helps the student complete their transition from an undergraduate student to a world-ready professional. The study usually centers on the student's major and may be conducted, at least in part, in the context of a group experience. Such programs are crafted to meet the unique needs of each major, and could include, for example, fieldwork, theater production, creative work in the arts, independent research, or independent readings. The integrative capstone in an interdisciplinary major must have the approval of both academic programs.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 2 of the following courses:
  • PSY213 Statistics and Research Design
  • PSY314W Foundations of Behavioral Research
  • 3

    CRM491

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 1

    CRM492

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 2

    CRM493

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    CRM494

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 4

    CRM498

    Tutorial: Criminology

    Tutorial: Criminology

    4

    CRM499

    Tutorial: Criminology

    Tutorial: Criminology

    4

    CRMJ3220RMU

    Intro to Criminology

    OCICU course taught at Robert Morris University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    CSA210

    Chatham Abroad: Asia

    Chatham Abroad: Asia

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    CSA230

    Chatham Abroad: Europe

    Study Abroad

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    CSA311

    Chatham Abroad: Asia

    Study abroad

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    CSA331

    Chatham Abroad: Europe

    Study Abroad

    3

    CSA341

    Chatham Abroad: North America

    Chatham Abroad: North America

    3

    CST183

    Representations of Race and Gender

    This course introduces students to the methodology of cultural studies. In this survey students learn those skills essential to analyzing social constructions of identity. Specific attention is paid to diverse texts, including film, in order to locate how representations of race, gender, ethnicity, and "otherness" are culturally produced and disseminated.

    3

    CST204W

    Introduction to East Asian Studies

    An exploration of East Asian geography, history, language, and culture from the Zhou Dynasty (ca. 1,000 BCE) to present times. Focus on China, Korea, Japan with reference to neighboring regions and discussion of Taiwan. Emphasis on arts, ideologies, and East Asian cultural sites in Pittsburgh area.

    3

    CST204W

    East Asian Studies

    An exploration of East Asian geography, history, language, and culture from the Zhou Dynasty (ca. 1,000 BCE) to present times. Focus on China, Korea, Japan with reference to neighboring regions and discussion of Taiwan. Emphasis on arts, ideologies, and East Asian cultural sites in Pittsburgh area.

    3

    CST213

    Special Topics

    Special Topics

    3

    CST215

    Perspectives in Queer Theory

    This course examines the cultural representations of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people in literature, film, history and social movements. We will explore how gender and sexual identities intersect with race, class and ethnicity. Finally, students will become conversant with the arguments and critical terms used in the field of queer theory.

    3

    CST234

    Asian Foodways

    A strategic survey of Japanese, Chinese/Taiwanese, Korean, and South Asian food ways in their originating contexts and the U.S. Emphasis on anthropological understanding of food ways, cultural studies critique of class, gender, and family dynamics articulated via food, and historical transformations of food culture in response to migration and globalization.

    3

    CST235

    East Asian Cinema

    This course investigates the political-economic and ethical-aesthetic factors that have shaped cinematic expression in China, Japan, and Korea, starting in the 1930s but emphasizing the recent outpouring of widely acclaimed films in a variety of genres.

    3

    CST342

    Post/Modern China: Digital Storytelling

    An examination of Chinese cultural history from early 1900s to early 2000s, via literature and film, with training in digital storytelling techniques. Discussion of this dramatic national narrative framed by political and aesthetic considerations. Our interpretation and transmission of these narratives framed also by ethics and efficacy.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ENG105 First - Year Communication Seminar
  • 3

    CST351

    Asian Migrations: Local and Global Narratives

    Study of diasporic waves arising in Vietnam, Nepal, India, China, Japan, Korea, etc., and flowing to the US (especially Western Pennsylvania) and elsewhere. Graphic novels, lyric tales, gender and class, emigrant-immigrant and rural-urban transitions, viewed from Cultural Studies and historical perspectives. Assignments include analyses, an interview, and a communication project.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ENG105 First - Year Communication Seminar
  • 3

    CST383

    Special Topics in Cultural Studies

    This course is intended to augment the current offerings in Cultural Studies. The content and material of the course depend on faculty areas of specialization.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • CST183 Representations of Race and Gender
  • 3

    CST490

    Integrative Capstone

    The integrative capstone, undertaken by the student during the senior year, is an extended project that helps the student complete their transition from an undergraduate student to a world-ready professional. The study usually centers on the student's major and may be conducted, at least in part, in the context of a group experience. Such programs are crafted to meet the unique needs of each major, and could include, for example, fieldwork, theater production, creative work in the arts, independent research, or independent readings. The integrative capstone in an interdisciplinary major must have the approval of both academic programs.

    3

    CST491

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 1

    CST493

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    CST498

    Tutorial: Cultural Studies

    Tutorial: Cultural Studies

    4

    CST499

    Tutorial: Cultural Studies

    Tutorial: Cultural Studies

    4

    DAN101

    The World of Dance

    This class explores the multitude of dance forms around the world via lectures, readings, films, and live performances. It approaches movement as a means of expressing the spirit and performing ritual, interacting socially and embodying cultural mores, and creating art. It looks at how new forms of dance are evolving as cultures fuse and technology opens up new venues.


    3

    DAN121

    Contemporary Dance Technique I

    This course introduces students to a blend of modern dance, modern ballet, and other prevalent dance forms. This course fulfills a wellness course requirement.

    3

    DSA150

    Introduction to Data Science

    Data Science is the study of the tools and process used to extract knowledge from data. This course introduces students to this important, interdisciplinary field with applications in business, communications, healthcare, etc. Students learn the basics of data organization, packaging, and delivery. Simple algorithms and data mining techniques are introduced.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • CMP120 Introduction to Programming
  • CMP202 Introduction to Programming
  • 3

    DSA400

    Data Visualization and Communication

    Cover the different ways of visualizing data, given different types and characteristics of data. Includes assessment and evaluation of existing data visualization techniques. Current tools used transform data and visualize data are reviewed, including Python, Google Charts, and/or Tableau.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • CMP120 Introduction to Programming
  • CMP202 Introduction to Programming
  • Complete all 2 of the following courses:
  • CMP283 Database Management Systems
  • DSA150 Introduction to Data Science
  • 3

    DSA400W

    Data Visualization and Communication

    Cover the different ways of visualizing data, given different types and characteristics of data. Includes assessment and evaluation of existing data visualization techniques. Current tools used transform data and visualize data are reviewed, including Python, Google Charts, and/or Tableau.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • CMP120 Introduction to Programming
  • CMP202 Introduction to Programming
  • Complete the following course:
  • DSA150 Introduction to Data Science
  • 3

    DSA411

    Machine Learning and AI

    An introduction to machine learning and artificial intelligence. Topics include classification, regression, clustering, planning, and scheduling. Includes current issues relevant to big data problems.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 2 of the following courses:
  • DSA150 Introduction to Data Science
  • BUS110 Business Statistics
  • Complete all 2 of the following courses:
  • DSA150 Introduction to Data Science
  • MTH110 Elementary Statistics
  • 3

    DSA490

    Integrative Capstone

    The integrative capstone is an extended project centered on a major; projects may include laboratory or fieldwork, creative work in the arts, advocacy work, or independent research; projects may be conducted in a group setting. Integrative capstones in the interdisciplinary major must be approved by both academic programs.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 2 of the following courses:
  • BUS310W Business Analytics: Research Methods
  • DSA150 Introduction to Data Science
  • 3

    DSA492

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 2

    DSA493

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    DWHP3300UIW

    Dimensions of Wellness

    OCICU course taught at University of the Incarnate World.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    EC3300RU

    Principles of Microeconomics

    OCICU course taught at Regis University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    ECN101

    Principles of Macroeconomics

    The concepts of national income and output are analyzed, and emphasis is placed on factors that influence the levels of economic activity, unemployment, and inflation, including fiscal and monetary policy and the role of international economics.

    3

    ECN102

    Principles of Microeconomics

    Microeconomics is the study of how households and firms make decisions and how they interact in specific markets. Students are introduced to the basic concepts and tools that economists use to understand how the economy works. This course is designed to increase economic literacy through acquiring core knowledge about economics.

    3

    ECN262

    Global Environmental Economics

    This course examines the economic perspectives and tools for analyzing environmental problems and evaluating policy solutions. The course covers both conceptual topics and real-world applications. Course discussions reflect the global nature of environmental problems and solutions. Cross-listed as ENV 262. This course fulfills an environmental general education mission course requirement.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ECN102 Principles of Microeconomics
  • 3

    ECN330

    Global Financial System and the Macro Economy

    Combines material on economic analysis of the macro economy with a review of the global financial system. Develops analytical models on how to attain economic growth, price stability, and full employment. Covers the financial system, financial crises, and monetary policy. Emphasizes both analytical models and real world policy applications.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 2 of the following courses:
  • ECN101 Principles of Macroeconomics
  • ECN102 Principles of Microeconomics
  • 3

    ECN331

    Managerial Economics

    This course covers the application of intermediate microeconomic analysis to business decision making. It is designed to bridge economic theory and economic practice. Topics include consumer theory, production analysis, pricing strategy, and risk analysis.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ECN102 Principles of Microeconomics
  • 3

    ECN351

    International Trade and Finance

    An introduction to international trade and finance, and an examination of the structure of international trade and the functioning of the international monetary system. Attention is given to recent issues in these areas and the relationship between the domestic and international economies.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • ECN102 Principles of Microeconomics
  • ECN101 Principles of Macroeconomics
  • 3

    ECN355

    Economic Analysis of Public Policy

    This course focuses on evaluating the rationale for government intervention in the economy and evaluating the efficiency, incentive, and distributional effects of government policies. Policies' impacts on issues such as how best to protect intellectual property, improve airline safety or control illegal immigration are also analyzed.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ECN102 Principles of Microeconomics
  • 3

    ECN358W

    Economic Development

    An examination of the factors accounting for economic growth and development of modern economically developed nations and less-developed areas. A review of the problems encountered in initiating and sustaining the process of economic development. Major policy issues are discussed. This course fulfills a global general education mission course requirement.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • ECN102 Principles of Microeconomics
  • ECN101 Principles of Macroeconomics
  • 3

    ECN490

    Integrative Capstone

    The integrative capstone, undertaken by the student during the senior year, is an extended project that helps the student complete their transition from an undergraduate student to a world-ready professional. The study usually centers on the student's major and may be conducted, at least in part, in the context of a group experience. Such programs are crafted to meet the unique needs of each major, and could include, for example, fieldwork, theater production, creative work in the arts, independent research, or independent readings. The integrative capstone in an interdisciplinary major must have the approval of both academic programs.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • BUS310W Business Analytics: Research Methods
  • BUS312W Marketing Research
  • 3

    ECN498

    Tutorial: Economics

    Tutorial: Economics

    4

    ECN499

    Tutorial: Economics

    Tutorial: Economics

    4

    ECO202SNH

    Macroeconomics

    OCICU course taught at Southern New Hampshire University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    EDC107

    Field Placement I

    This field experience is designed to familiarize pre-service teachers with the development of children in school settings. Through observation, guided practice and reflective journaling, this placement allows the pre-service teacher to strengthen observation and planning skills, to observe the physical, emotional and cognitive growth of children and to become familiar with classroom practices while working with a host teacher.

    Co-requisites

    • Child Development: Birth through grade 4
    1

    EDC200

    Field Placement: Learning Theory

    This field experience is designed to familiarize pre-service teachers with the cognitive development of children in school settings. Through observations, guided practice and reflective journaling, this placement allows the pre-service teacher to strengthen observation and planning skills, to observe the cognitive growth of children and to become familiar with classroom practices while working with a host teacher.

    1

    EDC240

    Integrating the Arts

    This interdisciplinary course provdies the basic understanding of the use of art, music, movement, and creative dramatics in an early childhood setting. It is designed to enhance the student's mastery of other subjects in the elementary curriculum. Students examine national and PA Academic Standards fo the Arts and Humanities in Art, Music, Theater, and Dance; and learn how to integrate these standards into interdisciplinary lessons in literacy, mathematics, science and hisotry for students pre-Kindertarten through fourth grade.

    3

    EDC250

    Field Placement III

    This field experience is designed to familiarize pre-service teachers with the inclusion practices and early interventions in school settings. Through observation , guided practice and reflective journaling, this placement allows the pre-service teacher to strengthen observation to observe the cognitive challenges of some children and to become familiar with classroom practices to accommodate these children.

    1

    EDC350

    Field Placement V: Instructional Strategies II

    Students work with host classroom teachers at two different levels (preK and 2nd or 3rd grade). Students assume a greater role in teaching students through small group activities and whole class activities with a focus on mathematics and social studies. Practice and comparisons of a variety of teaching methods are part of the experience. Students submit lesson plans, host teacher reviews, as well as a reflective journal and summary essay.

    Co-requisites

    • Elementary Social Studies Methods
    • EDU335 Methods of Teaching Elementary Mathematics
    1

    EDU104

    Perspectives on Education

    Students examine the role of teachers and schools in past and contemporary society. Selected educational issues are analyzed including role of technology in the classroom, legal issues for teachers, school-community relations, and current legislative initiatives. A 16 hour field placement is embedded in this course. Additional Fee(s): Field Placement Fee

    3

    EDU105

    Child Development: Birth Through Grade 4

    This course addresses physical, social, cognitive, and moral development from prenatal stages through middle childhood. Students examine child development in the context of social, cultural, instructional settings. Using case studies, the implications of growth and development on instructional planning for effective learning is achieved. Students learn to create environments that are healthy, respectful, supportive and challenging for all children.

    3

    EDU108

    Play and Movement

    A range of games and activities are explored in terms of functional movements and progression towards mature forms of selected physical skills. Healthy warm-up and participation strategies will be part of the exploration of each game. Games will be analyzed in terms of developmental appropriateness and the involvement of certain muscle groups and skill requirements. Students design an original game targeting the development of age-specific skills.

    1

    EDU205

    ELL Teaching Strategies for Classroom Teachers

    This course explores how effective language development results in children who successfully learn to read and can use reading effectively in academic subject areas and to negotiate the world. A major focus of this course is on information and methods for enhancing the literacy and academic experiences of students in grades K-12 classified as English as second language (ELL) students.

    3

    EDU207

    Trends and Issues in Early Childhood Education

    Students in this course will examine current and contemporary issues surrounding early childhood education. Class discussions focus on sociological, psychological, political, and economic forces shaping families, children and early educational experiences. Students will explore the connection between curriculum and physical environment. Major approaches and theories in early childhood curriculum are explored in terms of the cognitive, social and physical dimensions. Emphasis is placed on the physical expression of early childhood learning theory. Issues of health and safety, including state and federal regulations are also explored.

    3

    EDU214

    Special Topics

    Special Topics

    3

    EDU219W

    Cognitive Learning Theories

    This course addresses brain and cognitive development from prenatal stages through middle childhood. Students examine child development in the context of learning theories. The implications of physical and social growth and development on instructional planning for effective learning are explored. A field experience where theories and concepts can be observed is part of this course and serves to inform classroom discussion and activities.

    3

    EDU226SLU

    Human Growth and Development

    OCICU course taught at Saint Leo University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    EDU227

    Literacy

    This course is designed to equip graduating teachers to produce readers who are successful in the classroom and on standardized tests and use reading effectively to negotiate the world through the presentation of theory, research and practical strategies associated with the teaching of literacy skills. For the purposes of this course, literacy will be defined as one's ability to use language in order to listen, speak, read and write across the curriculum.

    3

    EDU230

    Mathematical Foundations

    This course relates the principles and process skills of basic mathematics to effective teaching with the best practices in the classroom. Concrete experiences with manipulatives and hands-on learning are an important piece in this course. In this course, students will acquire the skills necessary for informed decision-making in planning, facilitation of learning based on knowledge or research, best practices, state and national performances standards, and assessments.

    3

    EDU234

    Inclusion: Issues and Strategies

    This course provides the conceptual framework for understanding inclusion issues in our public schools. The students discuss the variety of exceptionalities found in public school settings and the resultant impact of inclusion policy upon instructional practice. A field placement is embedded in this course. Additional Fee: Field Placement Fee.

    3

    EDU240

    Integrating the Arts

    This interdisciplinary course provides the basic understanding of the use of art, music, movement, and creative dramatics in an early childhood setting. It is designed to enhance the student's mastery of other subjects in the elementary curriculum. Students examine national and PA Academic Standards of the Arts and Humanities in Art, Music, Theater, and Dance; and learn how to integrate these standards into interdisciplinary lessons in literacy, mathematics, science and history for students pre-Kindergarten through fourth grade.

    3

    EDU241

    Pedagogical Practices

    This course focuses on the characteristics of effective teaching practices and examines different ways that effective teachers help students learn. The impact of standards and accountability on lesson planning, implementing instruction and assessment is examined. How student diversity influences classroom practices is examined through case studies and discussion topics. The use of technology to create lesson focus, increase student involvement and to organize lesson content is a theme that is explored throughout the course.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • EDC104 Contemporary Education and Technology
  • EDU104 Perspectives on Education
  • 3

    EDU301

    Eden Hall Experience - Experiential Learning and

    This course covers strategies for experiential learning and for creating meaningful K-12 classroom experiences through community partnerships, field trips and projects. The class explores the following concepts and more: project based learning, place based learning, design challenge learning, maker spaces, adventure/outdoor education, environmental education.

    1

    EDU319

    Methods of Teaching Elementary Social Studies

    This course is a study of the resources and methods of teaching elementary social studies including geography and culture. Links to literature and the fine arts are part of this exploration of a thematic integration of social studies in classroom activities. A structured field experience is part of this course.

    3

    EDU323

    Educational Research Methods

    This course focuses on basic research methodology in preparation for the senior tutorial project. It provides a general approach for conducting any basic research project. Through a series of readings and meetings with an education program faculty member, the student will explore the various types of educational research, select and define a research question and complete a literature review. The student will also create an outline for the research paper including the appropriate statistical measures. Tutorial guidelines and Institutional Review processes will be reviewed. Students will meet with the faculty mentor, both in person and online.

    3

    EDU323W

    Educational Research Methods

    This course focuses on basic research methodology in preparation for the senior tutorial project. It provides a general approach for conducting any basic research project. Through a series of readings and meetings with an education program faculty member, the student will explore the various types of educational research, select and define a research question and complete a literature review. The student will also create an outline for the research paper including the appropriate statistical measures. Tutorial guidelines and Institutional Review processes will be reviewed. Students will meet with the faculty mentor, both in person and online.

    3

    EDU328

    Literacy II: Connections to Literature

    This course provides a foundation for selecting age, development, and cultural-appropriate literature that engages children and provides links to reading and writing in content areas. Students evaluate authors, illustrators, and study the various types of literature common to early elementary experiences that develop their emotional, social, language, cognitive, and creative talents.

    3

    EDU335

    Methods of Teaching Elementary Mathematics

    This course is designed to examine and explore recent research developments related to national efforts to reform the teaching and learning of mathematics. Students explore the teaching of mathematics in grades K-8 within the context of child development and learning theory. Research-based curriculum projects are explored in terms of their ability to promote deep conceptual understanding in mathematics. Considerations involved in examining or developing assessment tasks, instruments, and frameworks are addressed in relation to the content taught. Emphasis also is placed on reviewing specific content topics in math to increase the student's won competencies in these disciplines.

    3

    EDU336

    Methods of Teaching Elementary Science

    This course presents concepts, processes, and skills essential to the elementary school science program. The standards set by the National Science Teachers Association serve as a framework for the course. Inquiry teaching and learning are experienced through research-based national programs.

    3

    EDU400

    Data Driven Instruction Decisions

    The importance of making decisions based on actual data collected on students now plays a major role in all schools. The data that needs to be reviewed goes beyond standardized test results and needs to include both summative and formative assessment results. The connection between the curriculum and the assessments utilized to assess a student's progress along the curriculum needs to be viewed as a guide to effective educational decision making. Students entering the educational profession need a background in types of assessments and how data collected from such assessments can meet the needs of students in the context of the curriculum.

    2

    EDU409

    Differentiated Reading and Writing

    This course provides the regular and special education teacher with specific data-based knowledge and skills to teach reading and writing to students with disabilities. Strategies to develop conceptual understanding in the content areas are equally important for the beginning and more accomplished learner. Projects include developing lessons that differentiate instructional practice and assessment to help all students achieve.

    3

    EDU411

    Early Elementary Curriculum

    This course will explore both the theoretical framework and the practical strategies that teachers will utilize as they design learning situations to meet these challenges. Students will learn and apply a variety of techniques for designing lesson and unit plans, integrating curriculum across subject areas, addressing state standards, authentically assessing children, implementing positive classroom management strategies and involving parents in the classroom. Particular attention will be given to the topic of differentiation and the exploration of instructional strategies.

    3

    EDU415

    Secondary School Curriculum

    Students investigate instructional planning and implementation as well as a range of behavior and classroom management techniques. Reading assignments in appropriate professional literature encourage students to develop a familiarity with the most effective teaching approaches. Motivation, evaluation of student achievement, and differentiation of instruction are considered.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • EDU104 Perspectives on Education
  • 3

    EDU416

    Methods of Teaching Secondary English

    This course addresses the theory and philosophy of teaching language arts in middle and secondary schools. Classroom teaching strategies are explored and implemented in class presentations and in grades 7-12 public classrooms. Students plan instructional situations that clearly express the reading-writing connection that exists in effective language arts programs. FP Embedded: 16 hours

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 3 of the following courses:
  • EDU100 Introduction to Field Experiences
  • EDU102 Principles of Teaching and Learning
  • EDU104 Perspectives on Education
  • 3

    EDU417

    Methods of Teaching Secondary Social Studies

    This course intends to develop teaching/learning styles that research has shown are most effective for teaching social studies to adolescents. Contextual teaching, problem based learning and critical thinking are approached through instructional strategies that combine investigative classroom inquiry with both national and state content standards. Students learn to frame issues, help students research and analyze data and information and to construct meaning and understanding.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 3 of the following courses:
  • EDU104 Perspectives on Education
  • EDU100 Introduction to Field Experiences
  • EDU102 Principles of Teaching and Learning
  • 3

    EDU418

    Methods of Teaching Secondary Science

    Examination of current theory and practice for teaching science in secondary schools is explored in this course. Curriculum development, teaching strategies and methodologies, and assessment issues are also addressed. Students examine research-based curriculum and inquiry teaching and learning as best practices in science education.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 3 of the following courses:
  • EDU104 Perspectives on Education
  • EDU100 Introduction to Field Experiences
  • EDU102 Principles of Teaching and Learning
  • 3

    EDU419

    Methods of Teaching Secondary Mathematics

    A balance of theory and practice is explored in this course to help students become effective teachers of mathematics. Curriculum development, teaching strategies and methodologies, and assessment issues are also addressed. Students examine research-based curriculum and inquiry teaching and learning as best practices in science education.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 3 of the following courses:
  • EDU104 Perspectives on Education
  • EDU100 Introduction to Field Experiences
  • EDU102 Principles of Teaching and Learning
  • 3

    EDU422

    Pre-Student Teaching

    In this two-day/week field experience, the pre-service teacher gains experiences that will allow him/her to practice, develop, and demonstrate Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) Stage Three competencies through meaningful interactions with students and qualified mentors. Candidates are provided with frequent supervision in a collaborative school-university partnership with a local district. An approved application to Pre-Student Teaching that includes designated number of credits, GPA, and appropriate clearances is required.

    3

    EDU423

    Student Teaching

    Student Teaching

    9

    EDU430

    Diverse Family and Community Partnerships

    Advocates, educators, and parents have called for more and better family-school partnerships for decades. Recently, a body of empirical evidence has indicated that partnerships can have a positive impact. A number of studies highlight the positive associations between parent involvement in schools and their children's social and emotional development and academic achievement. This course explores the form and focus of several types of partnership.

    3

    EDU431

    Assessment and Adaptation

    Students investigate the assessment of individuals with mild to moderate disabilities. Topics include the fundamental principles of assessment tools and the social responsibility of professionals to exercise fairness and accuracy in the assessment process.

    3

    EDU432

    Human Geography

    The course provides a review of the interaction between diversity of culture and the impact of geography. Economics, government, social structure, and cultural diversity are all reviewed as they developed over time and in the context of the contemporary world.

    3

    EDU437

    Methods of Teaching Elementary Art

    Students approach the teaching of art consistent with national standards of pedagogy and art. This course combines theory, research and practical knowledge about teaching art as a universal language and creative experience to elementary school children. This course contains an embedded field experience of 16 hours in an elementary art classroom. Additional Fee: Field Placement Fee

    3

    EDU447

    Methods of Teaching Secondary Art

    Students approach the teaching of art consistent with national standards of pedagogy and art. This course combines theory, research and practical knowledge about teaching art as a universal language and creative experience to secondary students. Students work with host classroom teachers at two different schools or two different levels (middle and high school). Corequisite: EDU415.

    3

    EDU460

    Non-Licensure Practicum in Education

    This 140-hour practicum and weekly seminar is designed for students not seeking teaching certification in Pennsylvania. This course is to prepare students for professional practice in educational related settings and students will create documents or projects that ask them to reflect on the development of their own professional competencies.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • EDU411 Early Elementary Curriculum
  • 9

    EDU490

    Integrative Capstone

    The integrative capstone, undertaken by the student during the senior year, is an extended project that helps the student complete their transition from an undergraduate student to a world-ready professional. The study usually centers on the student’s major and may be conducted, at least in part, in the context of a group experience. Such programs are crafted to meet the unique needs of each major, and could include, for example, fieldwork, theater production, creative work in the arts, independent research, or independent readings. The integrative capstone in an interdisciplinary major must have the approval of both academic programs.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • EDU323W Educational Research Methods
  • 3

    EDU492

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 2

    EDU493

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    EDU498

    Tutorial: Education

    Tutorial: Education

    4

    EDU499

    Tutorial: Education

    Tutorial: Education

    4

    EDU502

    Perspectives on Education

    This course examines the influences that have resulted in the unique role of the teacher and school in our society in the past as well as the present. Topics include needs of exceptional children, the role of technology in education, and school-community relations. Students are required to complete a major research project that addresses a current educational issue. Co-Requisite: EDU580

    2

    EDU503

    Young Adolescent Literature

    In this course students explore and develop in-depth knowledge of children's literature and its integration into the early childhood or elementary curricula. Students are required to complete a major project using technology and the arts that reflects effective pedagogy.

    2

    EDU505

    Issues of Poverty in Education

    This course focuses on the characteristics and effects of poverty on education. Definitions and types of poverty are examined. The impact of poverty on cognitive and physical development as well as learning and behavior on individuals is examined. The influences of poverty on classroom and schools is assessed. Strategies to teach students of poverty and combat poverty in schools are discussed.

    3

    EDU508

    Games Children Play

    A range of games and activities are explored in terms of functional movements and progression towards mature forms of selected physical skills. Healthy warm-up and participation strategies will be part of the exploration of each game. Games will be analyzed in terms of developmental appropriateness and the involvement of certain muscle groups and skill requirements. Students design an original game targeting the development of age-specific skills.

    1

    EDU509

    Trends and Issues in Early Childhood Education

    Trends and Issues in Early Childhood Education

    3

    EDU510

    Differentiated Reading and Writing

    This course provides the regular and special education teacher with specific data-based knowledge and skills to teach reading and writing in content areas to students with disabilities.

    3

    EDU511

    Early Elementary Curriculum

    Students explore the teaching of all content areas in the early childhood setting. Students experience using a computer as a teaching tool, and examine and evaluate instructional software. A capstone research paper or project will demonstrate theory-based best practices to develop a curriculum for use in the early childhood classroom.

    3

    EDU514

    Data Driven Instructional Decisions

    The importance of making decisions based on actual data collected on students now plays a major role in all schools. Data review goes beyond standardized test results and includes summative an formative assessment results. The connection between curriculum and assessments assessing a student's progress needs to be viewed as a guide to effective educational decision making.

    2

    EDU515

    Secondary School Curriculum

    Students investigate instructional planning and implementation as well as a range of behavior and classroom management techniques. Reading assignments in appropriate professional literature encourage students to develop a familiarity with the most effective teaching approaches. Motivation, evaluation of student achievement, and differentiation of instruction are considered.

    3

    EDU516

    Methods of Teaching Secondary English

    This course addresses the theory and philosophy of teaching language arts in middle and secondary schools. Classroom teaching strategies are explored and implemented in class presentation and in 7-12 public classrooms. Students plan instructional situations that clearly express the reading-writing connection that exists in effective language arts programs. Co-Requisites: EDU515 and EDU581

    3

    EDU517

    Teaching Methods in Secondary Social Studies

    This course develops research-based strategies for teaching social studies. Contextual teaching, problem-based learning, and critical thinking are approached through instructional strategies that combine investigative classroom inquiry with both national and state context standards. Students learn to frame issues, help students research and analyze data and information to construct meaning and understanding. Co-Requisites: EDU515 and EDU581

    Co-requisites

    • EDU515 Secondary School Curriculum
    • EDU581 Pedagogical Practices
    3

    EDU518

    Methods of Teaching Secondary Science

    Examination of current theory and practice for teaching science in secondary schools is explored in this course. Curriculum development, teaching strategies and methodologies, and assessment issues are also addressed. Students examine research-based curriculum and inquiry teaching and learning as best practices in science education. Co-Requisites: EDU515 and EDU581

    3

    EDU524

    Teaching in a Urban Schools

    This course helps future teachers understand the complexities of teaching in a culturally diverse classroom. Students learn how to work effectively with students from various socioeconomic, religious, ethnic, and cultural groups. Students complete a major research project reflecting an understanding of best practices in effectively developing multicultural learning communities.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • EDU502 Perspectives on Education
  • 2

    EDU526

    Integrated Humanities Methods

    This course addresses theory and practice in teaching secondary school students to read and communicate effectively in the content area. The course provides strategies for teaching reading, listening, speaking, and writing in the secondary classroom. A research paper or project demonstrating mastery of contact area literacy is required.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 2 of the following courses:
  • EDU502 Perspectives on Education
  • EDU607 Child Development and Learning Theory
  • 2

    EDU528

    Integrated Math and Science Methods

    The purpose of this course is to provide pre-service teachers with experiences, understanding, and methods that they will be able to use in middle level mathematics and science classrooms. Students in this course will build an understanding of the relevant standards, instructional methods, and resources available for the middle level mathematics and science class.

    2

    EDU530

    Diverse Family and Community Partnerships

    Advocates, educators, and parents have called for more and better family-school partnerships for decades. Recently, a body of empirical evidence has indicated that partnerships can have a positive impact. A number of studies highlight the positive associations between parent involvement in schools and their children's social and emotional development and academic achievement. This course explores the form and focus of several types of partnerships. Must be taken with student teaching.

    3

    EDU531

    Assessment and Adaptation

    Students investigate the assessment of individuals with mild to moderate disabilities. Topics include the fundamental principles of assessment tools and the social responsibility of professionals to exercise fairness and accuracy in the assessment process.

    3

    EDU534

    Methods of Teaching Elementary Social Studies

    This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and tools needed to be effective elementary social studies teachers. Students will learn strategies that allow for diverse learners to "experience" social studies, and to integrate social studies with all other subject areas. In this course, together we will attempt to establish a "social curriculum" that starts with the social studies, includes all academic areas, and expands into the halls, the playground, and into the world.

    2

    EDU535

    Methods of Teaching Elementary Mathematics

    This course explores recent research developments of national reform efforts in teaching mathematics. Students explore the teaching of mathematics within the context of child development and learning theory. Research-based curriculum projects promote deep conceptual understanding in mathematics. Review of specific topics in math to increase the student's own competencies is included.

    3

    EDU536

    Methods of Teaching Elementary Science

    This course explores recent developments of national reform efforts in teaching science based on developmental and learning theory. Students will learn hands-on innovative classroom practices and review national and state standards for science education. Methods for increasing content knowledge related to schedule and technology will be explored.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 2 of the following courses:
  • EDU502 Perspectives on Education
  • EDU607 Child Development and Learning Theory
  • 2

    EDU537

    Methods of Teaching Elementary Art

    Students approach the teaching of art consistent with national standards of pedagogy and art. This course combines theory, research and practical knowledge about teaching art as a universal language and creative experience to elementary school children. This course contains an embedded field experience of 16 hours in an elementary art classroom.

    3

    EDU547

    Methods of Teaching Secondary Art

    Students approach the teaching of art consistent with national standards of pedagogy and art. This course approaches the teaching of art in the secondary school as a means of exploring the meaning and relevance of art to humanity. This course explores methods for engaging students in art experiences through a variety of teaching. This course contains an embedded field experience of 16 hours in a secondary art classroom.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 2 of the following courses:
  • EDU502 Perspectives on Education
  • EDU607 Child Development and Learning Theory
  • Co-requisites

    • EDU515 Secondary School Curriculum
    3

    EDU580

    Supervised Field III Experience

    This field placement offers the student the opportunity to experience and assess the culture of a school. Daily interactions among teachers, students, administration, and support staff in a unique physical setting provide the pre-service teacher with a comprehensive overview of school life.

    0

    EDU581

    Pedagogical Practices

    This course focuses on the characteristics of effective teaching practices and examines different ways that effective teachers help students learn. The impact of standards and accountability on lesson planning, implementing instruction and assessment is examined. How student diversity influences classroom practices is examined through case studies and discussion topics. The use of technology to create lesson focus, increase student involvement and to organize lesson content is a theme that is experienced throughout the course.

    1

    EDU583

    Conflict Resolution

    This course teaches students how to avoid conflicts from developing and explores methods to resolve conflict. This course also defines and presents a mediation process that employs a specific set of techniques that enables students to peacefully resolve conflict. Students taking this course will learn to manage conflict in their personal life, classroom, and in the workplace.

    Co-requisites

    • EDU664 Behavior Management in the Classroom
    1

    EDU591

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 1

    EDU592

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 2

    EDU593

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    EDU605

    Instructing Students With Autism Spectrum Disorders

    This course is designed to focus on pertinent issues and topics that concern students with autism. Spectrum disorders. This course provides an overview of evidenced-based instructional strategies used to teach students with autism as well as ways to collaborate with individuals in the home, school, and community. Topics will cover specific instructional strategies, family/community relations, behavior, inclusion and transition.

    3

    EDU606

    Adolescent Development and Learning Theory

    This course addresses physical, social, cognitive, and moral development during adolescence. The physical, social, and cognitive changes during puberty are explored in terms of their impact on student participation and performance in school settings. Through the use of case studies, an understanding of the implications of growth and development on instructional planning for effective learning is achieved.

    3

    EDU607

    Child Development and Learning Theory

    Focusing on child development from the prenatal stage to age 12, this course emphasizes current research on physical, cognitive, and social development. Students examine the nature of adolescent development, implications of the cognitive and affective characteristics of adolescents in the selection of instructional methods and materials, and structural and organizational features of typical high schools.

    3

    EDU609

    Literacy

    The interrelationships among listening, speaking, writing, and reading are investigated with a view toward emphasis on the impact that classroom organization, patterns, materials, and approaches have on teacher effectiveness in teaching elementary and early childhood-aged students, individually and in groups. Students are required to complete a major research paper or project in which they demonstrate knowledge of and skill in using teaching strategies that reinforce the theoretical considerations of the course.

    3

    EDU618

    Instructional Computer Integration

    This course helps students develop competency integrating computer technology with the school curriculum. It provides a practical introduction to using computers to help students learn emerging instructional technologies. Special emphasis is on the process and products available through computer technology and educational media. Students prepare an instructional unit integrating a variety of technologies.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • EDU502 Perspectives on Education
  • 2

    EDU629

    School Law

    The focus of this course is to explore the interaction between law and educational practice and their continuing development under the press of changing societal demands. The course provides educators with information and insights to enable them to address potential legal problems using sound judgment.

    3

    EDU634

    Inclusion: Issues and Strategies

    This course surveys practices of inclusion in education. It encompasses the historical precedents, underlying philosophy, education theory, instructional strategies, and practical implications of it implementation. Students participate in a variety of learning experiences throughout the course.

    3

    EDU639

    Integrating the Arts

    This interdisciplinary course provides the basic understanding of the use of art, music, movement, and creative dramatics in an early childhood setting. It is designed to enhance the student's mastery of content areas in the elementary curriculum. Students examine national and the PA Academic Standards for the Arts and Humanities in Art, Music, Theater and Dance; and learn how to integrate these standards into interdisciplinary lessons in literacy, mathematics, science and history for students pre-Kindergarten through fourth grade.

    3

    EDU657

    ELL Teaching Strategies for Classroom Teachers

    This course explores language development for English Language Learners for whom English is a second language. Pre-service teachers acquire knowledge and skills required to meet the educational needs of ELLs in their future classrooms. The course also addresses the legal responsibilities to English Language Learners under Pennsylvania and federal laws and regulations.

    3

    EDU661

    High Incidence Disabilities: Instructional Strategies Birth-Grade 8

    This course focuses on the design and implementation of an individualized education program for a child with mild learning needs and the selection, design, and adaptation of curriculum and instructional techniques in the areas of reading, language arts, and mathematics.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • EDU506 Issues in Special Education
  • Co-requisites

    • EDU582 Field Placement: Learning Support/Inclusion
    3

    EDU662

    Advanced Instructional Interventions 7-12

    This course provides an advanced application of recent research and reviews of interventions for individuals with high incidence disabilities in the 7-12 grades. Topics will include: recent research on interventions in reading, writing and math, effective instructional practices, learning strategies, reading, writing and math instructional strategies, content area accommodations, testing accommodations and transition.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • EDU510 Differentiated Reading and Writing
  • Co-requisites

    • EDU690 Practicum in Special Education
    3

    EDU664

    Behavior Management in the Classroom

    Students investigate the principles and systematic approaches used to identify and analyze problem management techniques, individual behavior and affective intervention strategies, and community-based support programs designed to address problem behaviors. Crisis intervention and conflict resolution are explored as strategies for confronting challenging behaviors.

    3

    EDU668

    Low Incidence Disabilities: Birth-8th Grade

    This course focuses on the design of a comprehensive educational program for students having low incidence disabilities in PREK-8. Teacher Candidates are exposed to the curriculum of students with low incidence disabilities, define various low-incidence disabilities, as well as develop and implement lesson plans, curriculum and assistive technologies.

    3

    EDU669

    Low Incidence Disabilities 7-12

    This course focuses on the design of a comprehensive educational program for students having low incidence disabilities in 7-12.Teacher/Teacher candidates will be exposed to the curriculum of students with low incidence disabilities such as life, vocational, and social skills, and functional academics.  In addition, student will be able to identify and define various low-incidence disabilities as well as develop and implement lesson plans, curriculum and assistive technologies. Student will learn how to consult and research available journals and resources for teaching students with low-incidence disabilities. * This course requires an embedded 10 hours of field placement. Students must have valid federal FBI, PA Criminal and PA Child Abuse clearances to complete the field placement.

    3

    EDU671

    Collaboration, Consultation, and Teamwork

    This course focuses on developing effective collaboration skills with members of the school community, as well as the community at large, to provide a realistic and integrated program for all children. Students engage in a variety of group activities that call for the need to analyze group dynamics and implement effective communication strategies.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • EDU506 Issues in Special Education
  • EDU634 Inclusion: Issues and Strategies
  • 3

    EDU673

    Instructional Personalization and Transition

    This course focuses on the transition of special needs students throughout their school programming. The following topics are examined: parent's needs and methods of collaborating, Early Childhood Intervention, Inclusion, Sexuality and Transition to Adult Life.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 2 of the following courses:
  • EDU506 Issues in Special Education
  • EDU661 High Incidence Disabilities: Instructional Strategies Birth-Grade 8
  • Co-requisites

    • EDU584 Field Placement: Transition I
    2

    EDU690

    Practicum in Special Education

    This course is designed for students who hold a Pennsylvania certification and are seeking certification in special education. Students demonstrate their ability to plan for and deliver a minimum of 15 lessons to special needs students enrolled in regular education or resource rooms.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 3 of the following courses:
  • EDU524 Teaching in a Urban Schools
  • EDU668 Low Incidence Disabilities: Birth-8th Grade
  • EDU673 Instructional Personalization and Transition
  • 6

    EDU694

    Student Teaching for the Urban Fellow

    During the 14 week pre-K-6 placement, student teachers will plan and implement lesson and assume other appropriate instructional responsibilities under the guidance of an experienced teacher and a college supervisor. Students develop a portfolio based on the PDE Form 430 to document their competencies for certification.

    3

    EDU696

    Student Teaching

    During one 8 week elementary and one 8 week secondary placement, student teachers will plan and implement lessons, and assume other appropriate instructional responsibilities under the guidance of an experienced teacher and a college professor. Students develop a portfolio based on the PDE form 430 to document their competencies for certification. Pre-requisites: Completion of all program requirements.

    9

    ELI031

    Basic Reading

    Basic Reading

    3

    ELI032

    Basic Grammar

    Basic Grammar

    3

    ELI033

    Basic Listening/Speaking

    Basic Listening/Speaking

    3

    ELI034

    Basic Writing

    This basic level writing course focuses on developing learners’ abilities to write sentences and series of sentences about topics of immediate relevance linked with simple connectors like ‘and’, ‘but’ and ‘because’.

    3

    ELI071

    Focus on Listening/Speaking

    Focus on Listening/Speaking

    3

    ELI073

    Focus on Reading

    Focus on Reading

    3

    ELI075

    Focus on Writing

    Focus on Writing

    3

    ELI077

    Focus on Grammar

    Focus on Grammar

    2

    ELI081

    Listening/Speaking I

    This course focuses on improving students listening comprehension and oral expression in English. Students will work on improving conversational skills and participation in classroom discussion.

    3

    ELI082

    Speaking/Listening II

    Speaking/Listening II

    3

    ELI083

    Grammar I

    This course focuses on improving students' awareness of English grammar. Grammar structures will be taught through a variety of mediums including reading, writing, and listening activities.

    3

    ELI084

    Grammar II

    Grammar II was developed for intermediate-level language learners to raise learners' awareness of the differences between the grammar of written English and that of spoken English and improve learners' accuracy in their speaking and writing. Grammatical elements are integrated into topical reading, listening, speaking, and writing assignments, and students learn to identify, analyze, and apply new sentence structures. By the end of the course, students will have the skills to comprehend more sophisticated texts and to communicate in speaking and writing with increasing levels of accuracy.

    3

    ELI085

    Reading I

    This course focuses on improving reading skills and focuses on fluency and comprehension. Students will read academic articles as well as longer extensive readings. Vocabulary acquisition is also stressed.

    3

    ELI086

    Reading II

    Reading II

    3

    ELI087

    Writing I

    This course will focus on improving students' written expression in English. Students will be able to write a well-organized and coherent paragraph with minimal grammatical errors.

    3

    ELI088

    Writing II

    Writing II

    3

    ELI090

    American Culture and Cinema

    American Culture and Cinema

    3

    ELI091

    US Culture I

    US Culture I

    3

    ELI092

    Communication for Success

    Communication for Success

    3

    ELI094

    Writing for Success

    Writing for Success

    3

    ELI101

    Academic Reading

    This course offers advanced instruction in college-level reading on a variety of topics that students will encounter in their academic experience. Acquisition of academic vocabulary is also stressed.

    3

    ELI102

    Academic Writing

    Most international students have had no previous interaction in writing academic English and are not aware that the rhetorical patterns of English are different from those used by their native languages. Thus, the primary focus of this course is on the American English rhetoric necessary for presenting written arguments in a logical, coherent manner. Students write short papers (for their academic classes, if possible), demonstrating their mastery of the forms. The second focus is on the form and mechanics of writing a research paper. Using library facilities, students learn the various types of materials and ways of researching a topic.

    3

    ELI104

    Academic Composition

    Academic Composition

    3

    ELI106

    Classroom Interaction

    This course focuses on improving students listening comprehension and oral expression in English. Students will work on improving conversational skills and participation in classroom discussion.

    3

    ELI107

    Advanced College Readings

    Advanced College Readings

    3

    ELI108

    Academic Communication Skills

    Academic Communication Skills

    3

    ELI193

    US Culture - Pittsburgh

    US Culture - Pittsburgh

    3

    ELI501

    Graduate Academic Discourse

    Graduate Academic Discourse

    3

    ELI503

    Graduate Writing

    Graduate Writing

    3

    ELP011

    Basic Listening/Speaking A

    This basic level course focuses on developing learners' abilities to communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a simple and direct exchange of information on familiar and routine matters and describe in very simple terms aspects of his/her background, immediate environment, and matters in areas of immediate need.

    2

    ELP012

    Basic Reading A

    This basic level reading course continues to develop students' abilities to read simple texts on a variety of familiar topics.

    2

    ELP013

    Basic Writing A

    This basic level writing course aims to develop the students' abilities to write comprehensible sentences on familiar topics.

    2

    ELP014

    Basic Grammar A

    This basic level grammar course provides explicit instruction and practice of basic grammatical elements and structures including nouns and adverbs, tenses, and time and reason clauses.

    1

    ELP016

    Basic Listening and Speaking B

    This basic level course focuses on developing learner's abilities to communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a simple and direct exchange of information on familiar and routine matters and describe in very simple terms aspects of his/her background, immediate environment, and matters in areas of immediate need.

    2

    ELP017

    Basic Reading B

    This basic level reading course continues to develop students' abilities to read simple texts on a variety of familiar topics.

    2

    ELP018

    Basic Writing B

    This basic level writing course aims to develop students' abilities to write comprehensible sentences on familiar topics.

    2

    ELP019

    Basic Grammar B

    This basic level grammar course provides explicit instruction and practice of basic grammatical elements and structures including nouns and adverbs, tenses, and times and reason clauses.

    1

    ELP031

    Low Intermediate Listening and Speaking A

    This low-intermediate listening and speaking course was designed to develop the students' abilities to communicate in simple tasks requiring a direct exchange of information and to participating in discussions in the classroom context The course also focuses on developing listening comprehension skills and strategies and everyday and academic vocabulary.

    2

    ELP032

    Low-Intermediate Reading A

    This low intermediate level reading course is designed to develop students' skills in reading simple academic and literary texts. The focus is on developing their abilities to identify main ideas and details by answering a variety of question types. The course also focuses on increasing high frequency and academic vocabulary and sentence structures.

    2

    ELP033

    Low Intermediate Writing A

    This low intermediate writing course is designed to develop students' abilities to write well-developed and fairly well-organized texts on familiar topics. The course introduces different writing process strategies and expands students' knowledge and use of vocabulary, grammar, syntax, and paragraph structure.

    2

    ELP034

    Low Intermediate Grammar A

    This intermediate level grammar course develops learners' ability to notice and understand the meaning and use of new grammatical forms in intermediate level listening and reading texts; use new grammatical forms in speaking and writing with improved accuracy; and plan, monitor, and assess their spoken and written output.

    1

    ELP036

    Low Intermediate Listening and Speaking B

    This low intermediate level listening and speaking course continues to develop the students' abilities to communicate in simple tasks requiring a direct exchange of information and to participating in discussions and presentations in the classroom context. The course also focuses on developing listening and comprehension skills and strategies and everyday academic vocabulary.

    2

    ELP037

    Low Intermediate Reading B

    This low intermediate level reading course continues to develop students' skills in reading simple factual and literary texts. Students continue developing skills to demonstrate their ability to identify main ideas and details by answering a variety of question types. The course also focuses on increasing high frequency and academic vocabulary and sentence structures.

    2

    ELP038

    Low Intermediate Writing B

    This low intermediate writing course is designed to continue developing students' abilities to write well-developed, well-organized, and cohesive texts on familiar topics. The course expands on the different writing process strategies and expands students' knowledge and use of vocabulary, grammar, syntax, and paragraph structure.

    2

    ELP039

    Low Intermediate Grammar B

    This intermediate level grammar course develops learners' ability to notice and understand the meaning and use of new grammatical forms in intermediate level listening and reading texts; use new grammatical forms in speaking and writing with improved accuracy; and plan, monitor, and assess their spoken and written output.

    1

    ELP051

    Int. Listening and Speaking A

    This intermediate-level listening and speaking course develops students' knowledge and skills in social and academic interactions such as lectures, classroom discussions, and presentations in the classroom context. The course also focuses on developing students' listening comprehension skills and strategies, note-taking skills, and building general and academic vocabulary, as well as improving their cohesion, coherence, and clarity of speech.

    2

    ELP052

    Intermediate Reading A

    This intermediate level reading course develops students' skills in reading a variety of academic texts. The focus is on developing students' abilities to identify the main ideas and supporting details in the reading texts and use the information in responses to readings and classroom discussions. The course also focuses on expanding students' academic vocabulary.

    2

    ELP053

    Intermediate Writing A

    This intermediate level writing course is designed to develop students' abilities to write well-developed, well-organized and cohesive essays on personal and academic topics. The course introduces different strategies in the writing process and expands students' knowledge and use of vocabulary, sentence structures, and organization.

    2

    ELP054

    Intermediate Grammar A

    This intermediate-level grammar course develops learners' abilities to notice and understand the meaning and use of new grammatical forms in listening and reading texts; use new grammatical forms in speaking and writing with improved accuracy; and plan, monitor, and assess spoken and written output.

    1

    ELP056

    Int. Listening and Speaking B

    This intermediate-level listening and speaking course develops students' knowledge and skills in social and academic interactions such as lectures, classroom discussions, and presentations in the classroom context. The course also focuses on developing students' listening comprehension skills and strategies, note-taking skills, and building general and academic vocabulary, as well as improving their cohesion, coherence, and clarity of speech.

    2

    ELP057

    Intermediate Reading B

    This intermediate level reading course develops students' skills in reading a variety of academic texts. The focus is on developing students' abilities to identify the main ideas and supporting details in the reading texts and use the information in responses to readings and classroom discussions. The course also focuses on expanding students' academic vocabulary.

    2

    ELP058

    Intermediate Writing B

    This intermediate level writing course continues to develop students' abilities to write well-developed, well-organized, and cohesive essays on personal and academic topics. The course introduces different strategies in the writing process and expands students' knowledge and use of vocabulary, sentence structures, and organization.

    2

    ELP071

    High Inter Listening/Speaking A

    This high intermediate course was designed to develop students' abilities to listen to short authentic academic talks. It also aims to develop their abilities to participate in classroom discussion and presentations.

    2

    ELP072

    US Culture

    This course introduces students to various topics related to US culture, values, traditions, and ways of life through readings, discussion, and reflection on experiences.

    2

    ELP073

    High Inter Writing A

    This high intermediate course was designed to develop students' writing abilities to write well-developed, well-organized, and clear argumentative essays on a general or academic topic.

    2

    ELP074

    High Inter Grammar A

    This high intermediate grammar course was designed to develop students' ability to make grammar choices in writing. It focuses on giving students corrective feedback on their writings, addressing common errors among second language writers, teaching students' self-editing skills, and introducing certain grammatical features useful for various academic writing tasks.

    1

    ELP076

    High Inter Listening/Speaking B

    This high intermediate course was designed to continue developing students' abilities to listen to short authentic academic talks. It also aims to develop their abilities to participate in classroom discussion and presentations.

    2

    ELP077

    US Culture and Pittsburgh

    US Culture-Pittsburgh is a course of study which will acquaint each student with historical and cultural information about the City of Pittsburgh. It will also allow students to participate in and enjoy cultural experiences with are uniquely "Pittsburgh."

    2

    ELP078

    High Inter Writing B

    This high intermediate course was designed to develop students' writing abilities to write well-developed, well-organized, and clear argumentative essays on a general or academic topic.

    2

    ELP079

    High Inter Grammar B

    This high intermediate grammar course was designed to develop students' ability to make grammar choices in writing. It focuses on giving students corrective feedback on their writings, addressing common errors among second language writers, teaching students self-editing skills, and introducing certain grammatical features useful for various academic writing tasks.

    1

    ELP103

    Grammar for Academic Writing A

    This advanced grammar course was designed to develop students' ability to make grammar choices in writing with the focus on writing styles and mechanics specified in the latest guidelines for APA.

    1

    ELP103

    Advanced Grammar

    This advanced grammar course was designed to develop students' ability to make grammar choices in writing with the focus on writing styles and mechanics specified in the latest guidelines for APA.

    3

    ELP122

    American Literature A

    American Literature A is a survey of contemporary American fiction, and all of our readings will be in the form of short stories. Students will learn to identify literary elements of fiction that help readers identify author purpose, audience, and cultural significance. Students will also be expected to write short response papers that discuss these literary elements in selected stories and to attend at least one literary event.

    1

    ELP122

    American Literature

    American Literature is a survey of contemporary American fiction, and all of our readings will be in the form of short stories. Students will learn to identify literary elements of fiction that help readers identify author purpose, audience, and cultural significance. Students will also be expected to write short response papers that discuss these literary elements in selected stories and to attend at least one literary event.

    3

    ENG100

    Multicultural Literature

    This survey course explores works written by multi-ethnic writers. In this course, students will spend considerable time learning the principles and methods of close literary analysis to develop critical reading and thinking skills. Students will examine how culture relates to literature: How does ethnic heritage contribute to writing? How do these writers define community and culture? How do strong oral traditions translate into literary forms? Students also will spend considerable time exploring the historical and social issues raised by the various texts. In discussing the many ways multicultural writers express their identities, students will attempt to analyze the complexity of their cultural identities.

    3

    ENG100

    Introduction to Literary Studies

    This course focuses on the principles and methods of close literary analysis to develop critical reading and thinking skills. By examining how culture relates to literature, students explore how ethnic heritage contributes to writing; how writers define community and culture; and how strong oral traditions translate into literary forms.

    3

    ENG102

    Expository Writing

    A practical course for students who need to improve their grammar and usage skills, digesting and arranging ideas, marshalling suitable evidence, illustrating a point, composing distinct paragraphs, and commanding various appropriate means of reaching an intended audience. May be repeated up to three times with the permission of the English program.

    3

    ENG105

    First - Year Communication Seminar

    First - Year Communication Seminar

    3

    ENG105

    First-Year Writing

    This introduction to college composition covers analytical and argumentative writing, oral presentation, critical reading, information literacy, and academic integrity. The course employs active-learning pedagogy of discussion and dialogue and examines intersections of race, gender, class, ethnicities, and systems of belief through the lens of relevant topics. Students who need additional support with writing skills beyond what is normally covered in the classroom (based on a diagnostic writing exam required before matriculation) will require Supplemental instruction through the PACE Center. Students with transfer credits may meet the requirement for ENG105 with the transfer of a college-level composition course or AP/IB credit.

    3

    ENG201

    Environmental Literature and Film

    ENG 201 considers how literature and film can engage the reader/viewer in issues of ecological sustainability. The course promotes the value of green spaces, an understanding of ecological systems, and a decentering of commonly held anthropocentric assumptions. Texts include contemporary films, fiction and nonfiction, such as Ruth Ozeki's All Over Creation (2004) or Kingsolver's Animal, Vegetable, Miracle (2008). This course includes 10 hours of experiential learning at the Eden Hall Campus.

    3

    ENG204

    World Literature

    A critical approach to major writers in several world traditions, from various periods, including such representative authors as Chuang Tze, Plato, and Wole Soyinka, and such representative works as the "Book of Genesis," The Bacchae, and The Odyssey.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • ENG100 Multicultural Literature
  • ENG100 Introduction to Literary Studies
  • Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • ENG105 First - Year Communication Seminar
  • ENG105 First-Year Writing
  • 3

    ENG207

    British Writers I

    A critical and historical approach to major writers in English during the Anglo-Saxon, medieval, and Renaissance periods, including such representative authors as the Beowulf poet, Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, and Milton.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • ENG100 Multicultural Literature
  • ENG100 Introduction to Literary Studies
  • 3

    ENG208

    British Writers II

    A critical and historical approach to major writers in English during the Augustan, Romantic, and Victorian periods, including such representative authors as Swift, Pope, Johnson, Wordsworth, Keats, Arnold, Tennyson, and Browning.

    3

    ENG209

    Linguistics

    An introduction to theoretical and applied linguistics as the "science of language" and its history, nature, and functions. Includes consideration of cross-disciplinary and cross-cultural linguistics, the nature of learning language, and linguistic analysis. Fulfills secondary English education certification requirement; recommended also for any student considering graduate study in English.

    3

    ENG210CLSLU

    Love and Desire in Literature

    OCICU course taught at Saint Leo University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    ENG216W

    American Writers I

    A study of cultural and literary developments in America, beginning with the Puritans and culminating with the writers of the American Renaissance: Emerson, Thoreau, Douglass, Hawthorne, and Melville.

    3

    ENG217W

    American Writers II

    A continuation of English 216, with emphasis on such figures as Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, Henry James, Faulkner, and Sylvia Plath.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • ENG100 Introduction to Literary Studies
  • ENG100 Multicultural Literature
  • Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • ENG105 First - Year Communication Seminar
  • ENG105 First-Year Writing
  • 3

    ENG220

    Women in Science Fiction

    This course focuses on the Science Fiction genre, attending in particular to issues of gender and sexuality. In addition to looking at images of women in Science Fiction (e.g. Barbarella or The Stepford Wives), students will study how women writers have used the genre to envision alternative gendered realities. How and why does this genre have specific appeal for women writers? How is Science Fiction particularly elastic when it comes to constructions of language, the body, sexuality, and identity?

    3

    ENG225SLU

    Writing Wild: Exploring the Four Genres

    OCICU course taught at Saint Leo University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    ENG234

    Minor Bird Lab

    This course is a practicum for publishing Chatham's undergraduate literary journal, 'Minor Bird'. All phases of the publishing process are addressed, especially copyediting, design, and marketing. The course is designed to allow students to gain experience and knowledge of the creative, technical, and professional aspects of publishing a literary journal.

    3

    ENG234

    Literary Publishing

    This course is an introduction to literary publishing through practice, reading, and discussion. All phases of the publishing process are addressed, especially copyediting, design, and marketing. The course is designed to allow students to gain experience and knowledge in the creative, technical, and professional aspects of publishing a literary journal.

    3

    ENG241

    Business Writing

    Business writing is designed to help students write clearly and effectively about a variety of subjects for specific audiences. Through actual writing practice and discussions of readings, a number of important issues are addressed, such as targeting an audience, determining methods of organization, and developing a flexible style.

    3

    ENG241

    Writing for Professionals

    Writing for Professionals helps students write clearly and effectively about a variety of subjects in genres related to the workplace. Through writing and reading assignments, students learn about targeting an audience, organizing writing, and developing a professional style. They create documents useful when seeking employment and in the workplace.

    3

    ENG242

    Introduction to Creative Writing

    This course introduces students to the distinguishing features and traditional elements of poems, plays, fiction, and nonfiction writing. Students read classic and contemporary works in each of these genres, while attending to how a given text adheres to or plays with generic norms. Readings in genre theory will accompany each unit of the course.

    3

    ENG243

    Creative Writing I

    Students present a selection of their work each week for class comment and criticism. In addition, special problem topics are assigned weekly to develop writing skills. Readings concentrate on contemporary prose and verse.

    3

    ENG244

    Creative Writing II

    Students present a selection of their work each week for class comment and criticism. In addition, special problem topics are assigned weekly to develop writing skills. Readings concentrate on contemporary prose and verse.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ENG243 Creative Writing I
  • 3

    ENG245

    Advanced Writing Workshop

    This course focuses on creative writing for experienced writers, geared toward preparing a finished manuscript for potential publication. Fiction writers work intensively on a single story, revising and integrating its various parts. Poets write either long poems or poetic sequences and experiment with contemporary variations on traditional forms.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 2 of the following courses:
  • ENG243 Creative Writing I
  • ENG244 Creative Writing II
  • 3

    ENG262

    Introduction to Women Writers

    Examining writers from Mary Wollstonecraft to the present, this course delineates the features of a literary tradition specific to women writing in English. Students study novels, essays, and poetry.

    3

    ENG282

    20th-Century African-American Literature

    This course is a critical study of major African-American writers from the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s to the present. Although the course concentrates on primary texts, specific attention is paid to contextualizing these works within historical and cultural frameworks. (See also Cultural Studies.)

    3

    ENG287

    African-American Writers

    This course provides an introduction to the African-American expressive tradition, including poetry, fiction, autobiography, song and folktales from the 18th century to the present. Examining writers such as Douglass, Chesnutt, Brooks, Baldwin, Ellison, and Walker, this course works to delineate the critical and historical contours of the African-American literary tradition.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • ENG100 Multicultural Literature
  • ENG100 Introduction to Literary Studies
  • Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • ENG105 First - Year Communication Seminar
  • ENG105 First-Year Writing
  • 3

    ENG302

    Environmental Children's Fiction and Film

    This course considers how children's and young adult literature and film can awaken environmental sensibilities in the reader/viewer. Students explore textual representations of flora, fauna, and the elements; the human desire to affiliate with the natural living world; and how fiction and film can promote ecological literacy and awareness.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ENG105 First-Year Writing
  • 3

    ENG303

    Food and American Identity

    Examines literature in multiple genres (e.g. fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction, graphic novel, film/television, and long-form journalism) through the theoretical lens of food studies to understand how writers use food as a cultural object to point to issues of identity including race, class, gender, sexuality, age, ability, and systems of belief.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • ENG100 Multicultural Literature
  • ENG100 Introduction to Literary Studies
  • Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • ENG105 First - Year Communication Seminar
  • ENG105 First-Year Writing
  • 3

    ENG310

    Summer Community of Writers

    The ten-day intensive residency in Pittsburgh is for upper-level BFA Creative Writing students. The residency is composed of genre-specific craft sessions, workshops, lectures, readings and one-on-one conferences with mentors.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 4 of the following courses:
  • ENG242 Introduction to Creative Writing
  • ENG243 Creative Writing I
  • ENG244 Creative Writing II
  • ENG245 Advanced Writing Workshop
  • 3

    ENG313

    Special Topics

    Special Topics

    3

    ENG321W

    Shakespeare Survey

    A representative study of Shakespeare's comedies, histories, and tragedies as literary, dramatic, and Elizabethan art.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • ENG207 British Writers I
  • ENG216 American Writers I
  • ENG216W American Writers I
  • 3

    ENG327

    Writing About Environment Science

    This course is designed for students with some basic scientific skills, who might become scientists professionally, but all of whom will be communicating about science, often to non-scientists. In this course, we will read, discuss, and practice a variety of methods of communicating about environmental science, from popular culture to news to government reports. Students will competently translate scientific results into written journalistic English and will be able to evaluate scientific results from the news in terms of its scientific accuracy and clarity. Three hours of lecture per week. Cross-listed as ENV 327. Pre-requisite: any 200-level ENV course or permission of either department chairperson.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • ENV201 Special Topics
  • ENV202 Exercise and the Environment
  • ENV213V Special Topics
  • ENV217 Env Solutions-systems
  • ENV221E Organic Gardening
  • ENV222E Organic Gardening
  • ENV224 Environmental Sculpture
  • ENV225 Environmental Ethics
  • ENV230 Wilderness- Food Sustainability
  • ENV230W Wilderness - Food Sustainability
  • ENV231 Wilderness & Food Sustainability
  • ENV233 Soundscapes:mus-nat-silnc
  • ENV242 Women and the Global Environment
  • ENV250 Plants, People, and the Environment
  • ENV255 Soundscapes: Music, Nature, and Silence
  • ENV262 Environmental Economics
  • ENV265 Environmental Economics
  • ENV275 Ecological Economics
  • ENV285 Internatl Env Policy
  • 3

    ENG350W

    Seminar in Literary Theory and Scholarly Writing

    An advanced course in writing literary analysis and methods of literary research; required of all junior English majors and interdepartmental majors before enrollment in the tutorial. Second-term junior status is required.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • ENG100 Introduction to Literary Studies
  • ENG100 Multicultural Literature
  • 3

    ENG351HU

    Technical and Report Writing

    OCICU course taught at Heritage University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    ENG355

    Advanced Writing and Stylistics

    This is an advanced writing class which concentrates on style, meaning, and effect. It is designed for upper-level students, and emphasizes the skills of writing more effective sentences, paragraphs and essays. The course focuses on writing academic papers, applications, proposals, and personal statements across the disciplines in appropriate formats.

    3

    ENG365

    Writing Fiction

    This is an upper-level course for BFA students specializing in fiction. Reading and writing will center on the craft of fiction and will include exploration of tools for creating character, scene, sense of place, summary, dialogue, framing, flashbacks, and transitions, as well as oral presentation and publication.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ENG242 Introduction to Creative Writing
  • 3

    ENG366

    Writing Nonfiction

    This is an upper-level course for BFA students specializing in creative nonfiction. Reading and writing will center on the craft of nonfiction and will include exploration of tools for scene, sense of place, point of view, character and narrator development, tone, lyricism, structure, as well as oral presentation and publication.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • ENG100 Multicultural Literature
  • ENG100 Introduction to Literary Studies
  • Complete the following course:
  • ENG242 Introduction to Creative Writing
  • 3

    ENG367

    Multi-Genre Writing

    This is an upper-level course for BFA students focusing on creative writing for experienced writers, geared toward preparing a finished manuscript or portfolio of work for potential publication in the student's primary genre. Students read and write in the craft of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Offered every spring.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 2 of the following courses:
  • ENG242 Introduction to Creative Writing
  • ENG100 Introduction to Literary Studies
  • 3

    ENG368

    Writing Poetry

    This is an upper-level course for BFA students specializing in poetry. Reading and writing will center on the craft of poetry and will include exploration of poetic tools including figures of speech, meter, music and rhythmic devices in both traditional and experimental forms, and oral performance and publication of poetry.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • ENG100 Multicultural Literature
  • ENG100 Introduction to Literary Studies
  • Complete the following course:
  • ENG242 Introduction to Creative Writing
  • 3

    ENG385

    Toni Morrison Seminar

    This seminar is a study of Toni Morrison’s literature within the context of African-American critical theory. Through Morrison’s work, students will engage in current issues regarding the politics of language, narrative authority, historical revision, the production of meaning, and African-American subjectivity.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • ENG100 Multicultural Literature
  • ENG100 Introduction to Literary Studies
  • 3

    ENG413

    Special Topics

    Special Topics

    3

    ENG425

    Bleak Houses: Shifting Landscapes of the English Novel

    This course will cover the modern European novel through the thematic rubric of "love and lies." The latter theme affords the opportunity to consider fiction not only as a medium of the literary genre of the novel but also as a discourse of self-expression, self-creation, and in the cases of some our lying protagonists, self-destruction. Students will focus on characters' constructions of "truth" and "lies" as these concepts are informed by characters' emotional positions. At its most ambitious, this focus on the dynamic of intersubjectivity not only provides important insights into the literature we will read but also enhances students' understanding of the interpersonal connections that drive individuals' worldviews and narratives.

    3

    ENG427

    Ethnicity and Place

    This course focuses on the connection between place and cultural identity in the shaping of a writer's distinctive voice. Influences include ethnic, regional, and linguistic markers, as well as dislocation from the place of origination. Regional focus within the global community may vary by academic term.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • ENG204 World Literature
  • ENG287 African-American Writers
  • 3

    ENG428

    Academic Writing

    Students develop the writing skills necessary for success in graduate school, including proper citations, time management, and the content and format for two types of research proposals. Students become proficient in the APA style and have the opportunity to resolve grammar and structure problems with the professor.

    3

    ENG429

    The Literary Cookbook

    This course examines the contemporary cookbook as a genre of literary nonfiction, influenced by autobiography, memoir, and personal essay. Students will read and write recipe texts through the theoretical lenses of food studies and literary theory to understand how cookbooks function as literature in the popular market and the academy.

    3

    ENG434

    Literature of Fact

    A study of selected nonfiction (e.g., essays, histories, biographies) designed to examine treatments of "fact" and to highlight differences in style among periods and writers. Selections compare 17th-, 18th-, and 19th-century works to contemporary pieces.

    3

    ENG446

    Wilderness and Literature

    Through close reading of poetry and prose, students will explore the relationship between wilderness and literature - both representations of the natural world and what Stanley Kunitz calls "your wilderness . . . the untamed self that you pretend doesn't exist, all that chaos locked behind the closet door, those memories yammering in the dark." Writers examined include: Anne Carson, Mark Doty, Kathleen Hill, and Virginia Woolf.

    3

    ENG449

    Exiles

    This course will examine the 20th-century condition of exile in relation to its different configurations, from European émigrés to postcolonial subjects to experiences of exile in the United States, to the relation of exile to Diaspora (African, Indian, and Jewish). Students will see how different patterns of movement define subjects variously as exiles, migrants, nomads, and tourists. They also will approach the concept of exile from psychological, geographical, and cultural angles to understand the different uses of the term, its scope, and its limitations.

    3

    ENG452

    Ecofeminist Literature

    This course brings together theoretical, nonfictional, and fictional approaches to the study of women and the environment. Students will examine how diverse ecofeminist writers problematize, resituate, and reclaim the woman/nature paradigm--a construct historically based in patriarchal culture. This course focuses particularly on how representations of women and environment (ranging from the traditional to the radical) can help students rethink and reimagine their relationship to the ecological world.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • ENG287 African-American Writers
  • ENG207 British Writers I
  • 3

    ENG480

    August Wilson Seminar

    This course explores the dramatic work of August Wilson, paying particular attention to Wilson's ten-play cycle, which chronicles twentieth century African American life. Wilson's "Pittsburgh cycle" serves as a lens for reading the history of the city decade by decade.

    3

    ENG490

    Integrative Capstone

    The integrative capstone, undertaken by the student during the senior year, is an extended project that helps the student complete their transition from an undergraduate student to a world-ready professional. The study usually centers on the student’s major and may be conducted, at least in part, in the context of a group experience. Such programs are crafted to meet the unique needs of each major, and could include, for example, fieldwork, theater production, creative work in the arts, independent research, or independent readings. The integrative capstone in an interdisciplinary major must have the approval of both academic programs.

    3

    ENG491

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 1

    ENG493

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    ENG498

    Tutorial: English

    Tutorial: English

    4

    ENG512

    Teaching Creative Writing in Alternative Spaces

    This course prepares students to teach creative writing in alternative spaces, including jails, prisons, halfway houses, and medical facilities. Students will study existing programs, learn strategies to work with special populations, design a course, observe community based classes, and facilitate a community workshop.

    3

    ENG513

    Writing About Food

    Students will develop technique and skills for writing about food and culture by studying ethics; journalism, advertising, multimodal and new technology venues, recipe writing, food criticism, writing about food in a variety of genres from history to fiction, magazines, and websites. Course emphasizes both print and online media.

    3

    ENG514

    Readings in the Pedagogy of Creative Writing

    This course is a pre-requisite for ENG515 and focuses on the theoretical and pedagogical readings related to the teaching of creative writing.

    3

    ENG515

    Teaching Creative Writing

    Students will explore the genres of poetry, fiction, drama, and nonfiction from the perspective of a teacher, producing lesson plans, as well as developing a final curricular creative writing unit/course. Aspects of lesson design, classroom environment/management, the writing process, writing workshops, assessment, publication, and performance will be emphasized.

    3

    ENG523

    The Craft of Creative Writing: Multiple Genres

    This course may substitute for any other craft course for students specializing in any genre. Students will be introduced to the craft of poetry, fiction, and non-fiction, and will also be introduced to the workshop method and given instruction on sending out work for publication.

    3

    ENG525

    Bleak Houses: Shifting Landscapes of the English Novel

    This course surveys the English Novel from 1850 through the present. Of particular interest will be how these novels depict their subjects' relationships with notions of Englishness, and with the radically changing landscape from estate-culture to urban-industrialized, and ultimately, suburban. Each novel will explore a new sense of Englishness rooted in the social-political and economic events of the era.

    3

    ENG527

    Ethnicity and Place

    This course focuses on the connection between geographic places and cultural identities. Ethnic, regional, and linguistic markers help define writers' distinctive voices. Dislocation from the place of origination can also result in a creative tension. Students will read a variety of texts that explore the borderlands between ethnicity and place.

    3

    ENG528

    Academic Writing

    Students develop the writing skills necessary for success in graduate school, including proper citations, time management, and the content and format for two types of research proposals. Students become proficient in the APA style and have the opportunity to resolve grammar and structure problems with the professor.

    3

    ENG529

    The Art of Compression

    A multi-genre writing workshop focusing exclusively on the short form in fiction, nonfiction and poetry. This course is designed to teach the techniques and practice of short-form writing through participation in a process of peer review and commentary, reading and discussions of selections of other writers and stories, and regular submissions of original creative compositions.

    3

    ENG531

    Readings in Contemporary Lyricism

    This course is a graduate seminar focusing on the close reading of text from various genres (poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and children's writing) that use lyricism as a primary craft device. Designed to complement the craft workshop, this course or Readings in Contemporary Narrative is required for all MFA students.

    3

    ENG532

    Readings in Prose and Poetry

    This course is a graduate seminar focusing on the close reading of prose and poetry drawn primarily from the modern and contemporary periods. Designed to complement the craft workshops, this course is required of all MFA students.

    3

    ENG533

    Readings in Contemporary Narrative

    This course is a graduate seminar focusing on the close reading of narrative texts from several genres (fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and children's writing), drawn from modern and contemporary periods. Designed to complement craft workshops, this course or Readings in the Contemporary Lyric is required of all MFA students.

    3

    ENG535

    Writing Poetry: Form

    A poetry writing workshop to focus on form. Pre Requisite: ENG583

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ENG583 The Craft of Poetry
  • 3

    ENG537

    Writing Poetry: Literary Movements

    A poetry workshop focusing on readings from a particular poetic movement, and writing poetry that models or responds to movement. Pre-requisite: ENG583

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ENG583 The Craft of Poetry
  • 3

    ENG539

    Writing Creative Nonfiction: Memoir

    A creative Non-Fiction workshop focusing mainly on the memoir. Pre requisite: ENG582

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ENG582 The Craft of Nonfiction
  • 3

    ENG544

    Writing Creative Nonfiction: The Lyric & Formally Adventurous Essay

    A creative non-fiction workshop focused on lyric and experimental essay forms.

    3

    ENG545

    Writing Creative Nonfiction: Literary Journalism

    A creative non-fiction workshop focusing on literary journalism. Pre Requisite: ENG 582

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ENG582 The Craft of Nonfiction
  • 3

    ENG546

    Wildness and Literature

    Students read poetry, nonfiction and fiction that explore the relationship between wilderness and humans as well as the relationship between wilderness and culture. This seminar will trace the idea of wilderness in American literature through the twenty-first century.

    3

    ENG548

    Writing Creative Nonfiction

    This course is designed to teach the techniques and practice of creative nonfiction through participation in a process of peer review and commentary, reading and discussions of selections of other writers and stories, and regular submissions of original creative compositions. The course is taught in a workshop format. Pre-requisite: ENG582

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ENG582 The Craft of Nonfiction
  • 3

    ENG549

    Exiles

    This course examines the 20th-century condition of exile in relation to its different configurations, from European émigrés to postcolonial subjects to experiences of exile in the United States, to the relation of exile to Diaspora (African, Indian, and Jewish).

    3

    ENG551

    Writing Fiction: The Short Story

    This course furthers one's technique and practice of fiction writing via focusing on the short story. Classic models are read and analyzed for variety of P.O.V., character development, story structure, etc. Students are expected to participate in ongoing discussions and weekly peer review. This course is taught in a workshop format.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ENG581 The Craft of Fiction
  • 3

    ENG552

    Ecofeminist Literature

    This course brings together theoretical, non-fictional, and fictional approaches to the study of women and the environment. This course focuses particularly on how representations of women and environment can help students rethink and re-imagine their relationships to the Earth.

    3

    ENG553

    Writing Poetry

    This course is designed to teach the techniques and practice of poetry writing through participation in a process of peer review and commentary, reading and discussions of selections of other poets and poems, and regular submissions of original creative compositions. The course is taught in a workshop format.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ENG583 The Craft of Poetry
  • 3

    ENG554

    Writing Fiction

    This course is designed to teach the techniques and practice of fiction writing through participation in a process of peer review and commentary, reading and discussions of selections of other writers and stories, and regular submissions of original creative compositions. The course is taught in a workshop format. Pre Requisite: ENG581

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • ENG581 The Craft of Fiction
  • ENG523 The Craft of Creative Writing: Multiple Genres
  • ENG582 The Craft of Nonfiction
  • 3

    ENG557

    Writing Fiction: Story Collections/Novel-in-Stories

    This course furthers one's technique and practice of fiction writing via studying book length story collections and/or story cycles. Contemporary models are considered for their creative melding of varied themes. P.O.V.'s structures, etc. Students are expected to participate in ongoing discussions and weekly peer review. This course is taught in in a workshop format. Pre requisite: ENG581

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ENG581 The Craft of Fiction
  • 3

    ENG562

    Children's Literature

    Designed to complement "Writing for Children and Adolescents," this course surveys the best of children’s fiction and nonfiction and encourages the student to examine issues of plot, story development, character, setting, and creative use of language.

    3

    ENG566

    Young Adult Literature

    This course explores young adult fiction and focuses on authors that capture the teenage experience. Students learn the distinction between children's and adolescent literature, the history of the genre, the psychological challenges of adolescence, and literary structural elements and techniques.

    3

    ENG567

    Long Projects

    The Long Projects class is a multi-genre workshop focusing on generating long projects including memoirs, essay collections, novels, story collections, poetry collections or long poems.  Students may choose to work toward their theses in this class but work is not limited to the thesis.    

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • ENG523 The Craft of Creative Writing: Multiple Genres
  • ENG581 The Craft of Fiction
  • ENG582 The Craft of Nonfiction
  • ENG583 The Craft of Poetry
  • 3

    ENG568

    Practicum: Fourth River Journal-1

    This course is a practicum in which grad students publish the print edition of Chatham's national literary journal, Fourth River. All phases of the publishing process are addressed, with a special emphasis on editorial acquisitions and copy editing.

    3

    ENG569

    Practicum: Fourth River Journal-2

    This course is a practicum in which grad students publish the print edition of Chatham's national literary journal, The Fourth River. All phases of the publishing process are addressed, with a special emphasis on design, production, proofreading, marketing, and distribution.

    3

    ENG572

    The Literature of Social Engagement

    A course in which students examine literature that engages with social problems. Readings will include poetry, creative nonfiction, literary journalism, scriptwriting, and fiction. In examining these texts, we will analyze the finished product as well as research methods authors used to research a topic and render it on the page.

    3

    ENG580

    August Wilson and Pittsburgh

    This course explores the dramatic work of August Wilson, paying particular attention to Wilson's ten-play cycle. We will perform close readings of the plays, examining themes such as urban migration, the blues and Black Nationalism, while simultaneously using Wilson's drama as a lens for reading the history of Pittsburgh.

    3

    ENG581

    The Craft of Fiction

    This is a required course for MFA students specializing in fiction. Students will experiment with creating scene, sense of place, summary, dialogue, framing, flashbacks, and transitions. Students will be introduced to the workshop method and given instruction on sending work out for publication.

    3

    ENG582

    The Art and Craft of Narrative

    Readings and writing in this multi-genre course will focus on constructing narratives in fiction, nonfiction, poetry or writing for children. Students will be introduced to the workshop method and given instruction on sending work out for publication.

    3

    ENG583

    The Art and Craft of the Lyric

    Readings and writing in this multi-genre course will focus on writing lyrically in poetry and prose. Students will be introduced to the workshop method and given instruction on sending work out for publication.

    3

    ENG584

    The Environmental Imagination

    This is a multi-genre course that focuses on the art and craft of nature and environmental writing. Students will read and study contemporary nature and environmental writing, and will be expected to generate creative work that illustrates a deep understanding of the literary tools available to writers in this genre.

    3

    ENG585

    Travel Writing

    This course focuses on the art and craft of travel writing. Students will read and study contemporary travel writing, and will be expected to generate creative work that illustrates a deep understanding of the literary tools available to writers in this genre.

    3

    ENG589

    Creative Writing: Multi-Genre

    A multi-genre craft course that includes poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, children's writing and hybrid genres. This course fulfills the craft requirement for all genres.

    3

    ENG595

    Independent Literary Publishing

    This course gives students the opportunity to gain hands-on experience as publishers. Students will research independent literary presses or magazines of their own choosing, and then they will publish a literary chapbook by an author other than themselves.

    3

    ENG605

    Prose Thesis Seminar

    A workshop focusing on generating a thesis proposal, bibliography and significant creative work towards completion of the student's thesis. Readings will focus on creating and articulating a creative process and vision as well as models for longer creative projects. Normally taken the first semester of the student's second year, this course is a prerequisite for ENG698 Final Manuscript.

    3

    ENG606

    Thesis Seminar

    A workshop focusing on generating a thesis proposal, bibliography and significant creative work towards completion of the student's thesis. Readings will focus on creating and articulating a creative process and vision as well as models for longer creative projects. Normally taken the first semester of the student's second year, this course is a prerequisite for ENG698 Final Manuscript.

    3

    ENG607

    Thesis Seminar: Poetry

    A workshop focusing on generating a thesis proposal, bibliography and significant creative work towards completion of the student's thesis. Readings will focus on creating and articulating a creative process and vision as well as models for longer creative projects. Normally taken the first semester of the student's second year, this course is a prerequisite for ENG698 Final Manuscript.

    3

    ENG612

    Mentorship I

    Mentorship I is designed for students of Chatham low-Residency MFA in Creative Writing Program as the first-year tutorial class. During the mentorship, a student works one-on-one with a faculty mentor who guides the student's study of literature and craft; the mentor provides written commentary on the student's work.

    6

    ENG612I

    Mentorship I- Part One

    Mentorship I is designed for students of Chatham low-Residency MFA in Creative Writing Program as the first-year tutorial class. During the mentorship, a student works one-on-one with a faculty mentor who guides the student's study of literature and craft; the mentor provides written commentary on the student's work. Part one of two.

    6

    ENG612II

    Mentorship I - Part Two

    Mentorship I is designed for students of Chatham low-Residency MFA in Creative Writing Program as the first-year tutorial class. During the mentorship, a student works one-on-one with a faculty mentor who guides the student's study of literature and craft; the mentor provides written commentary on the student's work. Part two of two.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • ENG612I Mentorship I- Part One
  • ENG612 Mentorship I
  • 6

    ENG674

    Field Seminar: International

    The field seminar is a traveling creative writing workshop designed to push students outside the realm of comfort and make them question their assumptions about themselves and their culture. Travel locations and specific topics will vary, but will always be outside the United States. May be repeated for credit. Additional fee(s): Field Seminar fee.

    3

    ENG674A

    Field Seminar: International

    The field seminar is a traveling creative writing workshop designed to push students outside the realm of comfort and make them question their assumptions about themselves and their culture. Travel locations and specific topics will vary, but will always be outside the United States. May be repeated for credit. Additional fee(s): Field Seminar fee.

    3

    ENG674B

    Field Seminar: International

    The field seminar is a traveling creative writing workshop designed to push students outside the realm of comfort and make them question their assumptions about themselves and their culture. Travel locations and specific topics will vary, but will always be outside the United States. May be repeated for credit. Additional fee(s): Field Seminar fee.

    3

    ENG676

    Artists in the Community

    The field seminar is a traveling creative writing workshop designed to push students outside the realm of comfort and make them question their assumptions about themselves and their culture. Travel locations and specific topics will vary, but will be within Pittsburgh and Western Pennsylvania. May be repeated for credit. Additional fee(s): Field Seminar fee.

    3

    ENG678

    Field Placement

    During this course, taken in one of the final semesters of the M.F.A., students teach/study in a supervised field placement and practice the pedagogy of creative writing in a working classroom.

    3

    ENG683

    Special Topics

    Literature Courses on differing topics, usually thematically based.

    3

    ENG691

    Independent Study

    Independent study on a topic of the student's choice.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 1

    ENG692

    Independent Study

    Independent study on a topic of the student's choice.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 2

    ENG693

    Independent Study

    Independent study on topics of the student’s choosing.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    ENG694

    Internship

    Internship with a publishing company, literary press or other writing organization.  

    3

    ENG698

    Final Manuscript

    Independent work on the final creative thesis and critical introduction. Taken in the last year of the MFA. The Thesis Seminar (ENG 605, 606, 607, 608, or 609) is a prerequisite for this course.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • ENG605 Prose Thesis Seminar
  • ENG606 Thesis Seminar
  • ENG607 Thesis Seminar: Poetry
  • ENG608 Thesis Seminar: Children's Writing
  • ENG609 Thesis Seminar: Screenwriting
  • 3

    ENG709

    Summer Community of Writers

    This ten-day residency in Pittsburgh is particularly tailored towards ACT 48 educators or students seeking elective credit. Daily attendance in genre-specific writing workshops and conferences with visiting authors is required. Craft sessions, lectures and readings are available but optional.

    3

    ENG710

    Summer Community of Writers

    Summer Community of Writers

    6

    ENG710I

    Summer Community of Writers - Part One

    Summer Community of Writers - Part One

    6

    ENG710II

    Summer Community of Writers - Part Two

    Summer Community of Writers - Part Two

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • ENG710 Summer Community of Writers
  • ENG710I Summer Community of Writers - Part One
  • 6

    ENG712

    Mentorship II

    Mentorship II is designed for students of the Chatham Low-Residency MFA in Creative Writing Program as the second-year tutorial class. This course is designed to expedite the development of the student's MFA thesis.

    6

    ENG712I

    Mentorship II - Part One

    Mentorship II is designed for students of the Chatham Low-Residency MFA in Creative Writing Program as the second-year tutorial class. This course is designed to expedite the development of the student's MFA thesis. Part one of two.

    6

    ENG712II

    Mentorship II - Part Two

    Mentorship II is designed for students of the Chatham Low-Residency MFA in Creative Writing Program as the second-year tutorial class. This course is designed to expedite the development of the student's MFA thesis. Part two of two.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • ENG712I Mentorship II - Part One
  • ENG712 Mentorship II
  • 6

    ENG800

    Graduate Continuing Credit

    Graduate Continuing Credit

    1

    ENV115

    Shifting Environmental Paradigms

    This course emphasizes quantitative and formal reasoning, critical reading and analytical thinking. Students, drawing on real life examples in environmental science, learn to identify and evaluate data and become knowledgeable consumers of scientific information, and explore the ways science and technology impact our everyday interactions with the world around us.

    3

    ENV115L

    Environmental Paradigms Lab

    This course uses laboratory modules on soil, water, plants, animals, climate and energy to enhance the material presented in ENV 115. Students will learn to make careful and precise observations, design testable hypotheses, collect and interpret qualitative and quantitative data, and integrate these findings into written and oral presentations.

    Co-requisites

    • ENV115 Shifting Environmental Paradigms
    1

    ENV116

    Global Environmental Challenges

    This course explores the global implications of environmental issues. It is designed for all students interested in our global environment, one of the most critical issues of our time. The basic premise is that global ecological systems are in decline. This course will not only introduce students to the major issues causing or relating to this ecological decline, but also provide a template for thinking about and acting on solutions. Therefore, the focus is on active, participation-based learning, and students should leave the course ready to create environmental change.

    3

    ENV129

    Our Fragile Earth: A Scientific Perspective

    This course introduces students to a wide range of environmental issues from a scientific perspective. Specific topics vary from year to year, but this course utilizes lectures, discussions, laboratories, guest speakers and field trips to increase knowledge about environmental problems as well as increase scientific knowledge and literacy.

    3

    ENV129L

    Our Fragile Earth Lab

    This lab offers hands-on opportunity to perform basic environmental lab skills, including water testing, bioassay, and greenhouse experiment protocol. The course may be taken independently as a freestanding environmental lab course. Two hours of laboratory per week. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fee.

    1

    ENV145

    Environmental Biology

    This course addresses contemporary environmental issues in a consistent and concerted fashion so as to introduce students to biological concepts. The concepts are developed to the extent needed to inform an understanding of the issues. Three hours lecture and two hours lab per week.

    4

    ENV145L

    Lab: Environmental Biology

    Lab: Environmental Biology

    0

    ENV147

    Environmental Geology

    Fundamental earth science concepts are used to assess the impact of increasing global population and development on the Earth’s natural resources as well as to examine how natural processes interact with human activities. Aspects of environmental geology that are particularly applicable to western Pennsylvania are emphasized. Three hours lecture and two hours lab per week. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fee.

    4

    ENV147L

    Lab: Environmental Geology

    Lab: Environmental Geology

    0

    ENV208

    Backpacking: Experiencing the Natural History of Western

    Students learn local land-use and natural history, including soil formation, flora, and some fauna. Also covered are wilderness trip planning and leadership, including principles for minimizing human impacts and conserving outdoor spaces and wilderness heritage. One weekend overnight camping trip is required. Prior completion of 100-level science course is desirable.

    3

    ENV225

    Environmental Ethics

    An investigation of some of the important moral issues generated by human interaction with the environment (natural entities, ecosystems, and other species), such as obligation to future generations, the theoretical foundations for an adequate environmental ethic, biodiversity preservation, environmentally sound development and cultural practices, responsibility to animals, and personal choices and lifestyles. Cross-listed as PHI 225.

    3

    ENV242

    Women and the Global Environment

    This course will examine contemporary global environmental issues from a gendered perspective. It will address the following question: How does environmental change impact women’s lives, women’s health, women’s community roles, and how are women offering leadership to address these problems and offer alternative solutions at the global, national, and local levels? The course will examine these issues from a North/South perspective, examining how northern countries' consumption and policies are impacting women in poor and transitional countries. It will also focus on key environmental concerns, from climate change, resource extraction, population, consumption, and toxic contamination.

    3

    ENV247

    Environmental Geology

    Environmental Geology

    3

    ENV247L

    Environmental Geology Lab

    Environmental Geology Lab

    1

    ENV250

    Plants, People, and the Environment

    An introduction to the uses of plants by humans. Topics include the form, structure and genetics of plants related to their use as sources of food, shelter, fiber, flavors, beverages, drugs, and medicines. Plant structure and reproduction are studied in lecture and in-class activities with a particular focus on relationships between the plant's structural, chemical, or physiological attributes and the agricultural plant. Agricultural policies will also be discussed. Three hours of lecture per week.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • ENV116 Global Environmental Challenges
  • ENV129 Our Fragile Earth: A Scientific Perspective
  • 3

    ENV327

    Writing about Environmental Science

    This course is designed for students with some basic scientific skills, who might become scientists professionally, but all of whom will be communicating about science, often to non-scientists. In this course, we will read, discuss, and practice a variety of methods of communicating about environmental science, from popular culture to news to government reports. Students will competently translate scientific results into written journalistic English and will be able to evaluate scientific results from the news in terms of its scientific accuracy and clarity. Cross-listed as ENG327.

    3

    ENV327W

    Writing about Environmental Science

    This course is designed for students with some basic scientific skills, who might become scientists professionally, but all of whom will be communicating about science, often to non-scientists. In this course, we will read, discuss, and practice a variety of methods of communicating about environmental science, from popular culture to news to government reports. Students will competently translate scientific results into written journalistic English and will be able to evaluate scientific results from the news in terms of its scientific accuracy and clarity. Cross-listed as ENG327.

    3

    ENV446

    Wilderness and Literature

    Through close reading of poetry and prose, students will explore the relationship between wilderness and literature - both representations of the natural world and what Stanley Kunitz calls "your wilderness...the untamed self that you pretend doesn't exist, all that chaos locked behind the closet door, those memories yammering in the dark." Writers examined include: Anne Carson, Mark Doty, Kathleen Hill, and Virginia Wolf. Cross-listed as ENG 446.

    3

    ENV451

    Soil Science

    Study of soils as natural bodies, media for plant growth, and ecosystem components. Topics include soil morphology and characteristics, composition, formation, conservation, and soil erosion. Physical, chemical, and biological properties of soils are related to the production of plants, the functioning of hydrologic and nutrient cycles, and the protection of environmental quality. Cross-listed as LNS 551

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ENV129 Our Fragile Earth: A Scientific Perspective
  • 3

    ENV491

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 1

    ENV492

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 2

    ENV493

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    ENV498

    Tutorial: Environmental Studies

    Tutorial: Environmental Studies

    4

    ENV499

    Tutorial: Environmental Studies

    Tutorial: Environmental Studies

    4

    EXS101

    Introduction to Exercise Science

    This course is designed to provide an overview of the field of exercise science as a discipline and profession. Students will be exposed to methods and techniques employed to develop positive attitudes and habits that support an active lifestyle. Topics of health risk factors and wellness will be explored as they specifically relate to exercise. Possible career choices related to this field will also be discussed.

    1

    EXS102

    First Aid and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    A 1-credit lab/lecture discussion course in which American Res Cross techniques of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) for the Professional Rescuer, and Community First Aid and Safety are presented. In addition to these skills, current methods of management and treatment of emergency illnesses and injuries are also taught. All students who meet the American Red Cross standards will receive American Red Cross Certification. Two hours of lab per week. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fee.

    1

    EXS103

    Wellness

    This course is designed to optimize students' wellness. The various dimensions of wellness will be explored and various field trips will be taken over the course of the semester. The dimensions of wellness that will be covered in this course include: Physical, Emotional, Social, Spiritual, and Environmental. This course will provide opportunities to support students' desires to lead a healthy lifestyle. Wellness opportunity resources will be provided to improve overall health. In addition, students will complete self-assessments and document their individual progress within each of the dimensions of wellness stated. This course fulfills a wellness course requirement.

    2

    EXS104

    Introduction to Careers in Athletic Training

    This course is designed to provide an overview of the field of athletic training as a discipline and profession. Topics of injury prevention, evaluation, treatment and rehabilitation will be explored as they specifically relate to the profession. Possible career choices related to this field will also be discussed.

    1

    EXS105

    Personal Nutrition

    This course explores the various nutrients, their sources, digestion, absorption, and metabolism. Current research and dietary trends are presented against a background of basic nutritional concepts. Special emphasis is given to how nutrition can be emphasized to promote health and health maintenance across the lifespan.

    1

    EXS202

    Exercise and the Environment

    This course will provide students with a basic understanding of how various environmental conditions impact all aspects of health and exercise performance. Topics to be discussed will include: environmental health concerns, air pollution, temperature regulation heat/cold stress, altitude and health, microgravity, and hypobaria. Three hours of lecture per week.

    3

    EXS252

    Exercise and Nutrition

    This course introduces the student to the science of human nutrition and the relationship between health, exercise and food intake. Basic topics of digestion, absorption, metabolism, interaction and functions of nutrients will be covered. Special topics emphasized in this course include optimal nutrition for exercise and sport, energy use during exercise, evaluation of body composition (body fat, muscle mass), development of obesity, weight management, and nutritional factors in planning a successful muscular strength and endurance program.

    3

    EXS252W

    Exercise and Nutrition

    This course introduces the student to the science of human nutrition and the relationship between health, exercise and food intake. Basic topics of digestion, absorption, metabolism, interaction and functions of nutrients will be covered. Special topics emphasized in this course include optimal nutrition for exercise and sport, energy use during exercise, evaluation of body composition (body fat, muscle mass), development of obesity, weight management, and nutritional factors in planning a successful muscular strength and endurance program.

    3

    EXS301W

    Introduction to Critical Research Appraisal

    This course reviews current research design and statistical techniques needed for a better understanding of peer reviewed literature within exercise science. This course also reviews basic principles of an evidence based approach related to various types of exercise interventions, and common diagnoses and prognoses in the area of public health (e.g., obesity, diabetes). Material presented in lecture will be focused on "real world" data from the current literature. Two hours of lecture per week.

    2

    EXS302

    Principles of Strength and Conditioning

    Students learn to integrate anatomical and physiological function into a comprehensive strength and conditioning model. Topics include testing, evaluation, exercise techniques, program design, and aerobic endurance training. Students are introduced to facility organization, risk management, and developing a policies and procedure manual.

    3

    EXS303

    Skeletal Muscle Biochemistry

    This upper level undergraduate course will provide students with a comprehensive examination of the biochemical properties of skeletal muscle within the context of human health and disease. Specific topic areas include control of gene expression and protein synthesis, contraction and substrate utilization, non-muscle tissue interactions and exercise training and adaptations.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • BIO201 Anatomy
  • Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • BIO302 Physiology
  • BIO202 Physiology
  • 3

    EXS326

    Applied Exercise Physiology I

    This course provides students with the knowledge of theoretical and applied aspects of exercise physiology with an emphasis on exercise response and exercise testing. An in-depth understanding of how the body responds when exposed to acute bouts of exercise will be provided through lectures and laboratories. Topics discussed will include physiological adaptations of the cardiovascular, respiratory, metabolic, and neuromuscular systems in response to exercise, and assessment of aerobic endurance, muscular fitness and body composition. Three hours of lecture per week. CPR and first aid certifications are required.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • BIO302 Physiology
  • Co-requisites

    • EXS326L Lab: Applied Exercise Physiology I
    3

    EXS326L

    Lab: Applied Exercise Physiology I

    Experiments to complement the material presented in EXS326. Two hours of laboratory per week. Corequisite: EXS 326. Additional fee(s): Laboratory fee.

    1

    EXS345

    Kinesiology and Movement Science

    This course serves as an introduction to kinesiology and movement science of the human body. The student will learn the functional anatomy and biomechanics of the major joints of the human body and the application of kinesiology and biomechanical principles to describe and analyze normal and pathological human movement. Principles and practical application of motor learning, motor control and skill acquisition will also be introduced. Lab will include activities related to skill acquisition, performance and biomechanical analysis of functional motor patterns. Three hours of lecture per week.

    Co-requisites

    • EXS345L Lab: Kinesiology and Movement Science
    • EXS345LW Lab: Kinesiology and Movement Science
    3

    EXS345LW

    Lab: Kinesiology and Movement Science

    Experiments to complement the material presented in EXS 345. Lab will include activities related to skill acquisition, performance and biomechanical analysis of functional motor patterns. Three hours of laboratory per week. Corequisite: EXS 345. Additional fee(s): Laboratory fee.

    1

    EXS426

    Applied Exercise Physiology II

    This course provides students with the knowledge of theoretical and applied aspects of exercise physiology and wellness. The emphasis of this course is on the physiological adaptations to exercise training. Students will learn how to design exercise prescriptions for typical adult populations, athletic populations, and special populations (i.e. pediatric, geriatric, and obese). Three hours of lecture per week.

    3

    EXS426L

    Applied Exercise Physiology II Lab

    The emphasis of this lab is on the physiological adaptations to exercise training. Students will learn how to design exercise prescriptions for typical adult populations, athletic populations, and special populations (i.e. pediatric, geriatric, obese). Three hours of laboratory per week. Corequisite: EXS 426. Additional fee(s): Laboratory fee.

    1

    EXS490

    Integrative Capstone

    The integrative capstone, undertaken by the student during the senior year, is an extended project that helps the student complete their transition from an undergraduate student to a world-ready professional. The study usually centers on the student's major and may be conducted, at least in part, in the context of a group experience. Such programs are crafted to meet the unique needs of each major, and could include, for example, fieldwork, theater production, creative work in the arts, independent research, or independent readings. The integrative capstone in an interdisciplinary major must have the approval of both academic programs.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • EXS301W Introduction to Critical Research Appraisal
  • 3

    EXS493

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    EXS498

    Tutorial: Exercise Science

    Tutorial: Exercise Science

    4

    EXS499

    Tutorial: Exercise Science

    Tutorial: Exercise Science

    4

    FDT141

    Media Literacy

    This course introduces students to the Macintosh computer interface and related media practices. Students explore digital foundations, media related histories, theoretical frameworks and critical examination of production elements as they discover how computers are radically changing the way image makers create and present their work. Cross listed as ART 131 and COM 141. Additional fee(s): Course Computing fee.

    3

    FDT150

    Introduction to Digital Video Production

    This course introduces the tools, technology, and techniques of digital video production. Students plan, script, manage, and produce videos using digital technologies. Along with the technical application, students will be exposed to the history of video as an artistic and instructional medium, as well as the relationship of digital video to film and television. The theoretical focus is on critiques of narrative construction. Cross-listed as ART/COM 150. Additional Fee: Applied Art fee.

    3

    FDT160

    World Film History

    This course presents an overview of the history of film by focusing on key countries, both Western and non-Western, whose film industries have made important contributions to world cinema and/or whose filmmakers have pioneered important film movements. The course places film industries and movements in the context both of cinematic history and history of the societies in question.

    3

    FDT161

    Introduction to Film, Video and New Media Art

    This course is an introduction to critical and aesthetic perspectives on film, i.e. the rules, codes, and strategies by which film represents reality. Students will be exposed to a variety of movements and moments in film history, but history will not be an explicit focus for the course. The course will map out the major conceptual areas in film studies using new methodologies in the areas of narrative comprehension, new vocabulary in film semiotics, and multiculturalism and the media. Issues explored in this course include questions of history and memory, self and other, and identity in both the Western and non-Western contexts.

    3

    FDT200

    Final Cut Pro X

    This is a 2-credit course that provides students with a foundational knowledge of Final Cut Pro X. In this hands-on course, students work with practical approaches to video editing, from basic techniques to powerful advanced features.

    2

    FDT200

    Final Cut Pro X

    This is a 3-credit course that provides students with a foundational knowledge of Final Cut Pro X. In this hands-on course, students work with practical approaches to video editing, from basic techniques to powerful advanced features.

    3

    FDT210

    Studio: Adobe Illustrator

    This supplemental studio explores the practical applications of today's computer hardware and graphic design software. The focus of the class is on gathering critical knowledge and gaining basic mastery of a powerful design visualization and creative production tool. The studio will cover Adobe Illustrator on the Macintosh platform.

    1

    FDT213

    Special Topics

    Special Topics

    3

    FDT220

    Studio: Adobe Photoshop

    This supplemental studio explores the practical applications of today's computer hardware and graphic design software. The focus of the class is on gathering critical knowledge and gaining basic mastery of a powerful design visualization and creative production tool. The studio will cover Adobe Photoshop on the Macintosh platform.

    1

    FDT225

    Female Narration: Race and Gender in Women's Films

    This course looks predominantly at films directed by women who have worked out strategies for feminist film practice. The course will focus on the relationship between representations of women and the socio-political structures in which women live. It will also focus on the need for women, if they wish to affect perception of self and other, us and them, to take up the means of production. Exposing the sexual stratagems in various contemporary societies' permits women filmmakers to recreate the world in their own image. Study of traditional portrayals of women will support understanding of the differences between subject and object position. Negotiating these often-conflicting spaces allows students to comprehend the multiple mediations that structure a critical consciousness. Such awareness allows questions of responsibility in a world of diverse values and perspectives. The course is organized as a reading, viewing, and lecture, experience.

    3

    FDT230

    InDesign Studio

    This one credit supplemental course will provide students with a foundational knowledge of the InDesign interface. Students will learn foundations of InDesign, threading text-boxes, importing photos and styling images, utilize baseline grid, hyphenation, and libraries to create simple and complex layout compositions.

    1

    FDT250

    Introduction to Digital Video Production

    This course introduces the tools, technology, and techniques of digital video production. Students plan, script, manage, and produce videos using digital technologies. Along with the technical application, students will be exposed to the history of video as an artistic and instructional medium, as well as the relationship of digital video to film and television. The theoretical focus is on critiques of narrative construction. Cross-listed as ART 250. Additional Fee: Applied Art fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • ART141 Media Literacy
  • COM141 Media Literacy
  • FDT141 Media Literacy
  • 3

    FDT261

    Web Design I: Code + Aesthetics

    This introductory course in web design and net art production addresses formal design, aesthetic, conceptual and theoretical methods for the creative production and dissemination of student projects via a global network. Technical focus is on authorizing nonlinear documents using software and basic web programming languages. Students conceptualize projects around a variety of topics including: online social networks, memory and database theory, cultural interfaces, the screen and the body, and collective media. Cross-listed as COM 261. Additional fee: Course computing fee.

    3

    FDT300

    Critical Theory

    Critical theory offers a critical study of the key debates in theories of media and communication interfaced with cultural studies. This course also examines the communication circuit from production to consumption within the broader paradigms of cultural studies, feminism, politics of identity, and theories of ideology and postmodernism. Connections are made between these debates and wider debates in communication studies.

    3

    FDT300W

    Critical Theory

    Critical theory offers a critical study of the key debates in theories of media and communication interfaced with cultural studies. This course also examines the communication circuit from production to consumption within the broader paradigms of cultural studies, feminism, politics of identity, and theories of ideology and postmodernism. Connections are made between these debates and wider debates in communication studies.

    3

    FDT313

    Special Topics

    Special Topics

    3

    FDT350

    Intermediate Digital Video Production

    Students will utilize the nonlinear editing software program Final Cut Pro to examine methods of production and related theories involved in achieving structure in film and video. By conceptually dissecting and practically applying techniques such as splicing, transitional effects, and other editing processes, students will render sophisticated projects which are conscious of how the edit structures film and by doing so becomes another creative and technical layer for study. Cross-listed as ART 350. Additional fee: course computing fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • ART150 Introduction to Digital Video Production
  • COM150 Introduction to Digital Video Production
  • FDT150 Introduction to Digital Video Production
  • 3

    FDT369

    Interactive Strategies

    Interactive Strategies

    3

    FDT421

    Digital Animation and Compositing

    This production course provides an introduction to computer animation and visual effects. Students learn the principles, process, and philosophy of animation with a focus on the design and construction of environments, characters, and time-based motion. Students script, storyboard, design, and produce a short animated digital video. Cross-listed with ART 421.

    3

    FDT450

    Advanced Digital Video Production Studio

    This studio course is an intensive laboratory that looks at advanced methods of digital video production, including highly developed lighting practices, audio recording and mixing, nonlinear editing, and digital effects. Students will also experiment with various ways in which to prepare video for web streaming or embedding compressed video in multimedia applications. This course includes regularly scheduled screenings of significant experimental video and multimedia projects - continuing to engage students in conversations of aesthetic, structural, and critical concern. Cross-listed as ART 450.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • ART350 Intermediate Digital Video Production
  • COM350 Intermediate Digital Video
  • FDT350 Intermediate Digital Video Production
  • 3

    FDT469

    Advanced Visual Effects

    This course provides an advanced study in developing and executing visual effects for live action films. The course explores the history of special and visual effects by studying practical special effects that can be accomplished in camera, introducing color correction and grading, and mastering the advanced functions of Adobe After Effects as it pertains to live action visual effects.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • FDT421 Digital Animation and Compositing
  • 3

    FDT490

    Integrative Capstone

    The integrative capstone, undertaken by the student during the senior year, is an extended project that helps the student complete their transition from an undergraduate student to a world-ready professional. The study usually centers on the student's major and may be conducted, at least in part, in the context of a group experience. Such programs are crafted to meet the unique needs of each major, and could include, for example, fieldwork, theater production, creative work in the arts, independent research, or independent readings. The integrative capstone in an interdisciplinary major must have the approval of both academic programs.

    3

    FDT491

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 1

    FDT493

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    FDT498

    Tutorial

    Tutorial

    4

    FDT499

    Tutorial

    Tutorial

    4

    FDT500

    Lab: Final Cut Pro X

    This is a 2-credit supplemental course that will provide students with a foundational knowledge of Final Cut Pro X. In this hands-on course, students work with practical approaches to video editing, from basic techniques to Final Cut Pro's powerful advanced features. This is an Apple Certified Training Course. Additional Fee(s): Course Computing LAB Fee.

    2

    FDT510

    Lab: Adobe Illustrator

    This one credit supplemental lab explores the practical applications of today's computer hardware and graphic design software. The focus of the class will be on gathering critical knowledge and gaining basic mastery of a powerful design visualization and creative production tool. The ab will cover one of the essential design applications: Adobe Illustrator on the Macintosh platform.

    1

    FDT520

    Lab: Adobe Photoshop

    This one credit supplemental lab explores the practical applications of today's computer hardware and graphic design software. The focus of the class will be on gathering critical knowledge and gaining basic mastery of a powerful design visualization and creative production tool. The Lab will cover one of the essential design applications: Adobe Photoshop on the Macintosh platform.

    1

    FDT530

    InDesign Lab

    This one credit supplemental course will provide students with a foundational knowledge of the InDesign interface. Students will earn foundations of InDesign, threading text-boxes, importing photos and styling images, utilize baseline grid, hyphenation, and libraries to create simple and complex layout compositions

    1

    FDT543

    The Media Production Industry

    This course is offered in the final semester of the program and is designed to enhance the ability of graduates to establish themselves in the media production industry.

    3

    FDT550

    Media Project I: Digital Video Production

    Presents technical practices of digital video production: nonlinear editing, foundations of alternative screenwriting, videography, sound production, and other media-related processes are explored. Additional fee: Computing fee.

    3

    FDT563

    Media Contexts I: Media History

    Provides overview for incoming graduate students of current rhetorical concerns related to independent media, film production, and histories.

    3

    FDT571

    e-Merging Media I

    Maps ways the web can be utilized for the production of alternative narratives. Enables students to analyze and create works online using web-cams, streaming media, and interactive web-based projects. Additional fees: Course Computing fee

    3

    FDT613

    Special Topics

    Special Topics Class

    3

    FDT641

    The Craft of Screenwriting

    Provides a focus on the art and craft of Screenwriting. Students will read and study contemporary Screenwriting, and will be expected to generate creative work that illustrates a deep understanding of the literary tools available to filmmakers in this genre.

    3

    FDT650

    Media Project II: Advanced Digital Video Production

    Introduces students to Avid non-linear editing system, the most widely used system within the industry. Students will have a chance to explore the ways in which the Avid DV Xpress can enhance traditional editing techniques. Additional Fee(s): Course Computing Fee

    3

    FDT663

    Media Contexts I: Theory

    Analyzes the aesthetic conventions, narrative, and formats of new media, as well as the impact digital technologies have had on existing media.

    3

    FDT666

    Cinematography and Lighting

    In this course, students will focus on the skills required to make appropriate camera and lighting decisions under a variety of field and studio situations. Students will gain mastery of advanced concepts and principles of camera operation, camera movement, use of lenses, composition and lighting techniques used in digital filmmaking.

    3

    FDT667

    Advanced Sound Design and Audio Post Production

    In this audio production course, students will advance their audio knowledge and production abilities in sound design through sound recording, mixing, processing and editing. Students will learn how to assemble a pre-dub or temp mix, group and sub-mix tracks into the final dub that is for distribution and delivery.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • FDT675 Media Project III: Advanced Sound Production
  • 3

    FDT671

    Emerging Media II: Advanced Web Design

    Focuses on the technical through advanced study. Students will produce DVD, CD-ROM, and other interactive projects. Additional Fees: Course Computing Fee

    3

    FDT675

    Media Project III: Advanced Sound Production

    Focuses on advanced sound recording, editing, and mixing technologies using Pro Tools digital audio workstation. Additional Fee(s): Course Computing fee

    3

    FDT676

    Media Project IV: Visual Effects & Animation Modes

    Extends to visual effects, animation modes and compositing. Students will utilize this course to develop their masters' thesis topic and begin pre-production processes. Additional Fee: Course Computing Fee

    3

    FDT677

    Media Project V

    The mastery of written, oral, and production components: a self-directed project with an approved thesis topic generated by individual student interest. The final project is completed under joint guidance of the class instructor and an outside advisor. Additional Fee: Course Computing Fee

    6

    FDT683

    Internship

    Internship

    3

    FDT692

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 2

    FDT693

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    FDT800

    Graduate Continuing Credit

    Graduate Continuing Credit

    1

    FST150

    Food, Farm & Field

    This course explores food, farm, and environment through readings, films, lectures, demonstrations, field trips, and on-farm and kitchen experiences in research and production problems. Activities include presentations on specific topics, group discussions, hands-on lab and field activities, individual and group presentations, field trips, and reflection through writing, video, and photography.

    3

    FST205

    Food Science Principles and Practice

    Through didactic and experiential learning, students explore the physical, biological, and chemical makeup of food and how final products are influenced by food processing. Students identify the changes to food caused by storage and cooking methods and apply food science concepts to risk and prevention of foodborne pathogens.

    3

    FST213

    Special Topics

    Special Topics

    3

    FST234

    Asian Foodways

    A strategic survey of Japanese, Chinese/Taiwanese, Korean, and South Asian food ways in their originating contexts and the U.S. Emphasis on anthropological understanding of food ways, cultural studies critique of class, gender, and family dynamics articulated via food, and historical transformations of food culture in response to migration and globalization.

    3

    FST250

    International Cuisine

    This course explores international cuisine and culture through an interdisciplinary lens. Focusing on culinary history, the course emphasizes knowledge of global culture and cuisine. One of the featured regions of study will align with Chatham's "Global Focus" for the academic year.

    3

    FST302

    Nutrition and Community

    This course focuses on North American community-based nutrition research, programs and policies. Students become familiar with community-based research, programs, and policies where nutrition plays a role. Using public health nutrition and community asset building, it includes an introduction to grant writing, evaluation, and assessment to support community health programs.

    3

    FST315

    Food Access and Policy

    If food is a basic human right, how do societies create universal access to food? This course explores the ethical basis for making citizens food secure despite global inequality. Major topics include private vs. public solutions and the relationship between food access, gender, cultural appropriateness, nutrition, sustainability, and justice.

    3

    FST320

    Basic Agroecology

    Through working on Chatham's Eden Hall Farm as well as neighboring farms, students will integrate best practices for sustainable agriculture with theory encountered in class. Topics will include basic principles of soil fertility, biodiversity, agriculture history, effects of both conventional and organic agriculture, and the politics surrounding the issues.

    3

    FST320L

    Growing Sustainably Lab

    Through working with Chatham's Eden Hall Farm as well as visiting neighboring farms, students will integrate best practices for sustainable agriculture with theory encountered in classes. Topics will include basic principles of soil fertility, biodiversity, greenhouse production, agriculture history, effects of both conventional and organic agriculture, and the politics surrounding the issues.

    1

    FST342

    Sustainable Production

    Course explores specific modes of production, agricultural and culinary, with a focus on applied and experiential learning through practical application in a group project. Students focus on farm to kitchen and develop problem solving skills for practical applications, including plant and crop production and culinary product development.

    3

    FST365

    Coffee: History, Politics, Practices

    This course includes hands on and practical experiences at local coffee roasters with different business models. Participants train in the Eden Hall student cooperative cafe at Eden Hall including cupping, barista, and tasting skills. The correlated readings and assignments address challenging issues surrounding coffee, including labor, global procurement, and labeling.

    3

    FST402

    Global Agriculture

    This multi-disciplinary course examines agro-ecological, socio-economic, and political issues in tropical agriculture in the global South, focusing on how production and consumption impact food, agriculture, and community sustainability. The course centers on a two-week visit to EARTH University in Costa Rica, plus pre- and post-trip sessions in Pittsburgh.

    3

    FST417

    Safe Practices in Food and Agriculture

    This course offers professional knowledge about safe practices in agriculture and food production, such as safe food handling, worker safety, best practices for agricultural markets, and overviews of regulatory organizations. Students will follow practicum materials to gain both food safety certification and good agricultural practices standing.

    1

    FST420

    Basic Agroecology

    Through working on Chatham's Eden Hall Farm as well as neighboring farms, students will integrate best practices for sustainable agriculture with theory encountered in class. Topics will include basic principles of soil fertility, biodiversity, agriculture history, effects of both conventional and organic agriculture, and the politics surrounding the issues.

    3

    FST420L

    Growing Sustainably Lab

    Through working with Chatham's Eden Hall Farm as well as visiting neighboring farms, students will integrate best practices for sustainable agriculture with theory encountered in classes. Topics will include basic principles of soil fertility, biodiversity, greenhouse production, agriculture history, effects of both conventional and organic agriculture, and the politics surrounding the issues.

    1

    FST428

    Tree Care

    Tree care skills are integral to sustainable land and food system management. This course provides an introduction to arboriculture, tree climbing and pruning. It will teach proper tree pruning, basics of climbing, and basic equipment safety, applicable to tree work in urban or agricultural settings.

    3

    FST502

    Essential Readings in Food and Agriculture

    This class provides grounding in essential texts in the contemporary understanding of food and agriculture. Readings include key food histories, journalism, critical nutrition and food industry writers, and agriculture and environmental treatise. Class will meet monthly to analyze texts. Students will contribute to forum and blog discussions throughout the year.

    1

    FST504

    Food Science Principals

    We will study scientific literature on nutrient availability before and after cooking, learn about chemical and physical and visual changes to food through various storage and cooking methods and investigate our sensory responses to certain foods in various types of physical and cultural settings.

    3

    FST505

    Food and Representations

    Food is elemental to survival, culture, home, and subjectivity - to rituals of love, loss, and celebration. Focusing on representations of food and eating in spiritual narratives, epic texts, myth, novels, and film, this class examines the cultural work food performs along with the varying meanings assigned to food and eating.

    3

    FST508

    Food Systems

    Examines philosophical, sociological, economic, and cultural issues related to the production and consumption of food. From Agrarianism to the Green Revolution, explores the transformations of industrialization, technology, and migration. Provides foundation in food systems and commodity chains as concepts and methodological tools for uncovering the relationship between communities, agriculture, markets, and consumers.

    3

    FST509

    Food Access

    If food is a basic human right, how do societies create universal access to food? What is the moral ethical basis for making citizens food secure in an age of global inequality? To what extent does providing food access need to consider culturally appropriateness, nutrition, and sustainability, and justice?

    2

    FST509

    Food Access

    If food is a basic human right, how do societies create universal access to food? What is the moral ethical basis for making citizens food secure in an age of global inequality? To what extent does providing food access need to consider culturally appropriateness, nutrition, and sustainability, and justice?

    3

    FST510

    Food, Culture, History

    Provides an overview of food and diet in transnational history, emphasizing cultural impact of modernity of food gathering, farming, plant biology, the body and consumption, health, taste, and cuisine. Topics include the development of agriculture, the causes of famine, the disruptions of colonialism, global exchange, industrialization, migration, and commercial economic dominance of the food system.

    3

    FST511

    Research Methods

    Introduction to social science research methods applicable to the study of food and culture. Practicum includes ethnography, interviews, focus groups, survey research, oral history, textual analysis, cultural mapping, and visual methods. Applied approach to research: students will produce data for practical use in existing community or commercial projects.

    3

    FST512

    Practical Nutrition

    Course provides an overview of nutrition as an evidence-based research field, focusing on groups and communities where research is conducted and then applied. Topics include science and politics of food categories; supplements and functional foods; weight and disordered eating, commercial, local, organic, and conventional foods; cuisine, culture, and diet.

    3

    FST513

    Integrated Seminar in Applied and Environmental Microbiology

    This course will provide a forum for interdisciplinary learning and discussion in the core areas of applied and environmental microbiology. Students will analyze case studies based on real-world issues, use evidence-based practice to devise solutions to applied problems, and develop communication skills to convey disciplinary knowledge to different audiences.

    3

    FST514

    Wine, Ciders and Meads

    This course provides a detailed study of wines, grape varieties, ciders and mead. Offers an exploration of global wine regions and regional traditions for ciders and meads. Experiential components utilize local fruits and honey to produce experimental batches of wines and meads. Includes lab at Eden Hall and fieldwork component.

    3

    FST515

    Writing About Food

    Students will develop technique and skills for writing about food and culture by studying ethics; journalism; advertising, multimodal and new technology venues; recipe writing; food criticism; writing about food in a variety of genres from history to fiction, magazines, and websites. Course emphasizes both print and online media.

    3

    FST518

    Business of Food and Agriculture

    In this class the student will learn both history and current practices related to food and agriculture as economic enterprises in the United States and the world. Skills include ability to understand strategic management principles including identifying target markets, niche marketing, SWOT analysis and diffusion of innovation theory. Students will be able to develop a business plan including understanding barriers of entry, compiling demographic data, developing feasibility studies, long and short term business goals, define and calculate a breakeven point, and budget formulation.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • FST508 Food Systems
  • FST508 Food Systems
  • Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • FST509 Food Access
  • FST509 Food Access
  • 3

    FST520

    Basic Agroecology

    Through working on Chatham's Eden Hall Campus farm as well as neighboring farms, students will integrate best practices for sustainable agriculture with theory encountered in class. Topics will include basic principles of soil fertility, biodiversity, agriculture history, effects of both conventional and organic agriculture, and the politics surrounding the issues.

    3

    FST520L

    Growing Sustainably Lab

    This course is a co-requisite to FST520, Growing Sustainably, and comprises the experiential lab component of the course. Students will engage in sustained research on sustainable agricultural projects, from biodynamic methods to soil or pest management comparatives. Course may be taken up to four times for credit.

    1

    FST521

    Integrative Animal Care and Management

    This multi-disciplinary graduate course examines a range of agro-ecological, philosophical, socio-economic, health, and policy issues in livestock management. Key themes include: comfort and behavior of live animals; grass- and grain-based animal production; animal (and social and human) nutrition; livestock care; animal (and human) welfare; history of animal production; food safety.

    3

    FST522

    GIS: Food and Agriculture

    This course provides students with a solid foundation of the principles and applications of GIS, an introduction to the desktop software ArcGIS, and demonstrates its use in the public sectors related to food, agriculture, and resource use. Students will have the flexibility to focus on their particular area of interest through project work.

    3

    FST524

    Greenhouse Production

    Students will explore alternative season extension practices used in cold season production and compare the opportunities available to local farmers who choose to adopt season extension practices. Through class lectures and assignments students will learn the essentials of healthy soil, pest and disease identification, planting, harvesting and marketing opportunities available to sustainable farmers. Through working on Chatham's Eden Hall Farm as well as neighboring farms, students will integrate best practices for sustainable greenhouse growing with theory presented in class.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • FST520 Basic Agroecology
  • 3

    FST527

    Permaculture

    Course explores natural systems, aboriginal knowledge and best practices for designing human systems, which reflect care of the earth. It integrates findings of agriculture, horticulture, ecology, alternative energy, community design and green building. Students learn methods of growing and living sustainably, with local examples and applications of permaculture design for Eden Hall.

    3

    FST528

    Tree Care

    This course provides an introduction to arboriculture, tree climbing and pruning. The class will teach proper tree pruning and the basics of climbing, as well as basic equipment safety, applicable to tree work in urban or agricultural settings, and an introduction to work as an arborist.

    3

    FST530

    Sustainable Gastronomy

    This course covers the history of cooking as a profession and a skill set. Emphasis on gastronomy and culinary arts as both integrative creative enterprises and structured labor in specific contexts. The history of public cooking and dining, restaurants, communication of culture and cuisine, and procedures will be covered.

    3

    FST531

    Sustainable Fermentation

    Through hands-on production, tastings, lectures, students learn basics of fermentation, winemaking principles and practices, sensory evaluation through tastings, viticulture history, wine regions and types, winemaking methods, chemistry and winery operations. Local production includes root beer, beer, sake, local mead and vinegar. Emphasis will be on sustainable viniculture practices and local/global links.

    3

    FST532

    Sustainable Meat Production

    As part of sustainable agriculture and culinary knowledge, understanding meat production outside the conventional large scale processing facilities is a critical skill for students who will work with restaurants, farm markets, and other distribution venues.

    3

    FST534

    Learning Through Food

    This course explores theoretical frameworks and instructional approaches relevant to describing and supporting the ways people learn through experiences with food. This course covers the fundamentals of sociocultural and experiential learning theories and associated instructional philosophies to help students develop their identities as food educators.

    3

    FST540

    Orchard Systems: Focus on tree fruit

    Focusing on field experiences, this course explores tree fruit orchard production. Students will explore historical, cultural, agronomic, economic, and geopolitical aspects of tree fruit in a large orcharding region; gain hands-on experience in a mainstream industrialized sector of agriculture; and wrestle with complex questions regarding the contours of sustainability.

    3

    FST575

    Field Ecology

    The goal of this course is to introduce the students to the principles of ecology in urban and rural environments. Initially there will be a series of lectures to study ecological concepts, with extensive reading and discussion from the primary literature. The students will gain the understanding of how the physical environment, global cycles and climate influence the biogeographical distribution of global and regional ecosystems and local microhabitats. Lectures will focus on the physical environment, plant and animal adaptations, population ecology and community dynamics. One-half of the classes will consist of field trips to observe flora and fauna, practice plant and animal data collection techniques using standard field methods, and to study human ecology and the impacts of population growth and resource consumption.

    3

    FST591

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    1

    FST592

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 2

    FST593

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    FST600

    Oral History Intensive

    This course is a practicum designed to allow students intensive experience conducting oral history. It presumes a basic knowledge of research methods and is meant to provide a platform for exploring voice, history, and experience as key issues in the study of food, agriculture, and society. Students will produce three oral history interviews and participate in on-line and in-person discussions of technique, theory, and function.

    1

    FST602

    Global Agriculture

    Examines how contemporary agricultural era is characterized by the simultaneous existence of radically different farming systems within the same region. Course explores prior examples historically and regionally. Focus is then on what makes the contemporary agricultural age different, including respect for 'traditional' approaches as viable 'alternatives'; social and scientific research supporting alternatives; farmers/practitioner awareness of options ;and consumer-citizens driven awareness and advocacy.

    3

    FST603

    Food Journeys

    Food Journeys

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 2 of the following courses:
  • FST508 Food Systems
  • FST509 Food Access
  • 3

    FST605

    Food and Climate Change

    This course considers the relationship between Earth's changing climate and the human production and consumption of food. With attention to current theories and case studies, students will develop a comprehensive understanding of food systems in relation to global environmental change, with a specific focus on livelihoods, adaptation, sustainability, and justice.

    3

    FST607

    Sustainable Consumption

    Sustainable Consumption

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • FST508 Food Systems
  • FST508 Food Systems
  • Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • FST509 Food Access
  • FST509 Food Access
  • 3

    FST608

    Culture and Culinary Grains

    Culture and Culinary Grains

    3

    FST609

    Dairy: From Pasture to Plate

    This multi-disciplinary graduate course examines a range of agro-ecological, philosophical, socio-economic, health, and political issues related to dairy production in the US. Key course themes include: dairy history; sustainable and conventional production; raw milk and consumption debates; livestock care; milking; cheese-making; dairy policy; international issues; and popular representation of dairy.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 2 of the following courses:
  • FST508 Food Systems
  • FST509 Food Access
  • OR Complete any 2 of the following courses:
  • FST508 Food Systems
  • FST509 Food Access
  • 3

    FST611

    Religion, Community, and Food

    This course explains the ways in which sustainability and communal religious life have Intersected in the U.S. from the 17th century to the present. Using lecture readings, film, and independent research, we will study ethical farming practices, food sustainability, and moral food choices through the lens of American religious communities.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • FST508 Food Systems
  • 3

    FST612

    Food, Commerce, and Culture in Japan

    Combined with field experiences, this course explores food and culture in commercial and domestic settings in a specific global site, to be determined each summer. Classroom work and field experiences will explore historical, cultural, economic, and geopolitical aspects of food in that site. Topics include: food and national identity, food and globalization, food and economic sustainability.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • FST508 Food Systems
  • 3

    FST613

    Community Research: Food and Health

    Research focused on community needs, health and wellness issues, and the relationship between food access, agriculture, and food production. Participation in a pre-selected research study that aims to address some component of health, food access, agriculture, and cooking. May include: engaging relevant community agencies; recruitment of subjects; screening subjects for risk; adhering to IRB regulations; data collection and data entry, aiding in teaching a risk reduction class, participating in the urban garden, and coordinating cooking demonstrations.

    1

    FST614

    New Product Development

    This course will explore the new product development process from ideation to market. Students will study the methodologies and practices of product development in a traditional Consumer Packaged Good firm and apply modified methods to manage the new product development process for a start-up local distiller. Over the course of an academic year, students will develop and bring to market a liqueur to be sold by Pittsburgh Distilling Co.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • FST531 Sustainable Fermentation
  • 3

    FST615

    Food, Labor, and Inequality

    In this course, we will focus on theoretical and applied frameworks for thinking about the labor of growing food, transporting it, transforming it into comestibles, and finally, serving and cleaning related to food consumption. The course considers how global labor shapes the availability and appropriateness of food for different populations and therefore includes a substantial analysis of gender, race, and social class. Readings and discussion will touch on migrant labor, domestic cooking, waiting and serving, agriculture, cooks and chefs, and food professionals.

    3

    FST616

    Cultivating the Midwest: Corn and Soybeans

    Combined with field experiences in western Minnesota, this course explores food and agriculture in the Midwestern U.S. Classroom work and field experiences will explore historical, cultural, agronomic, economic, and geopolitical issues, including corn and soybean production, processing and distribution, alternative agrifood networks, and other food systems issues in the Midwest.

    3

    FST620

    Research in Food and Agriculture

    This course assists students developing a research, educational, public policy, or advocacy project in sustainable farming. Participants study a practical and current sustainable food and/or farming problem, review the literature related to the problem, develop management tactics and strategies to address the problem, and communicate their conclusions. Goal is to develop a research plan and project outcomes for a Masters thesis or project.

    2

    FST621

    Applied Methods

    This course is designed to help the student deepen their facility with qualitative and/or quantitative research methods to better understand diverse issues in the interdisciplinary field of food studies. The student will design, conduct, and/or analyze research as part of a thesis or other large project.

    1

    FST622

    Advanced New Product Development

    This course explores new product development process from ideation to market. Students study methodologies and practices of product development in a Consumer Packaged Goods firm. Focus for the advanced course includes consumer testing, packaging development, and production process to develop and bring to market a liqueur sold by Pittsburgh Distilling.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 2 of the following courses:
  • FST531 Sustainable Fermentation
  • FST614 New Product Development
  • 3

    FST624

    Chocolate: Politics and Pleasure

    This course will explore chocolate as a global product including history and culture, agriculture (growing trees, processing beans), direct/fair trade, labor and justice, health, chocolate production, sales, marketing, and sustainability. Experiential components include chocolate making, tempering; culinary practices, and site visits to chocolate manufacturers, culminating in the design and marketing of a sustainable chocolate product.

    3

    FST625

    U.S. Agricultural Policy

    This graduate multi-disciplinary course examines a range of philosophical, socio-economic, health and political issues related to agricultural policy in the US. It provides a foundation and introduction to U.S. farm policy as a means of exploring how political dynamics and choices impact the nature of food, agriculture, and communities at local, national and global scales.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • FST508 Food Systems
  • FST508 Food Systems
  • 3

    FST640

    Sustainable Community Development

    This course explores how people can engage in creating more environmentally, socially and economically sustainable communities at multiple scales, from the local to the regional. The reading and assignments emphasize sustainable planning theory and practice as well as sustainable food systems perspectives. Students will engage in practice-based research and community projects.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • FST508 Food Systems
  • FST509 Food Access
  • SUS504 Introduction to Sustainability and Systems
  • 3

    FST683

    Special Topics

    Special Topics

    3

    FST691

    Internship

    Internship placement will focus on local nonprofits, advocacy group, community projects, food companies, farms, co-ops, food producers, and policy agencies. Directed experience can include developing products, community knowledge, food system data, or promotional materials (course requires instructor signature).

    1

    FST692

    Internship

    Internship placement will focus on local nonprofits, advocacy group, community projects, food companies, farms, co-ops, food producers, and policy agencies. Directed experience can include developing products, community knowledge, food system data, or promotional materials (course requires instructor signature).

    2

    FST693

    Field Work Practicum

    Students engage in semester long field work and internships. Class meetings address ethical, logistical, and intellectual issues of community-based work in Food Studies. Site-based project development and implementation occurs in supervised and collaborative settings. Individual meetings with professor provide career development and advance research proposal skills.

    3

    FST697

    Thesis Practicum

    Thesis Practicum is intended to assist Masters students in the preparation of thesis and to facilitate the transition from research and project development to writing. This course will review research methods and design, literature review, time management demands, project management, and presentation skills.

    1

    FST698

    Thesis/Project

    Course provides supervision and research guidance for Masters thesis or projects in Food Studies. Students will have instruction in data analysis, writing for public presentation and publication, professional development workshops, and community development issues.

    1

    FST800

    Graduate Continuing Credit

    Graduate Continuing Credit

    1

    GBA105SLU

    Introduction to Business

    OCICU course taught at Saint Leo University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    GEO200SNHU

    World Geography

    OCICU course taught at Southern New Hampshire University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    HAA0050PIT

    Introduction to Medieval Art

    PCHE course taught at University of Pittsburgh

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    HCA302SLU

    Health Care Organization

    OCICU course taught at Saint Leo University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    HCA430SLU

    Contemporary and Critical Issues in Health Care

    OCICU course taught at Saint Leo University

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    HCA498SLU

    Health Planning and Policy Management

    OCICU course taught at Saint Leo University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    HCA500

    Analytics Consultant

    This course provides students the opportunity to master skills needed to use data analytics software to be proactive in guiding decision-making. Students engage in the visualization of data to influence decisions regarding targeted performance improvement areas. Interprofessional business skills will be enhanced to translate data into actionable plans in order to improve quality outcomes.

    3

    HCA500

    Data Literacy and Analytics

    This course provides students the opportunity to master data literacy skills needed to participate in and contribute to a data-driven culture. Through analysis and appropriate visualization of data, students will effectively communicate data as information to influence decisions for targeted performance improvement areas. Students will engage in story telling using data.

    3

    HCA501

    Analytics Leader

    This course provides students the opportunity to strengthen basic skills and knowledge in using data to make decisions. Leadership skills addressing interprofessional communication, strategic thinking and persuasive motivation will be discussed. Students will engage in activities which advance their ability to use technology and information systems to influence outcomes and improve overall quality.

    3

    HCI502

    Healthcare Delivery Systems

    In this course, students will be engaged in dynamic content to gain an understanding of the role of information systems within healthcare delivery. The course provides an introduction to the use of information technology, information systems, data, and informatics in regards to health care delivery system entities and functions.

    3

    HCI503

    Informatics Foundation and Health Care Technology

    This course will assist students to develop a strong foundation of knowledge in understanding the impact technology and informatics has in the delivery of care across various settings. Student will be introduced to current and emerging technologies while exploring the impact on patient outcomes and staff satisfaction.

    3

    HCI504

    Project Management I

    This course introduces basic project management principles needed when altering workflow processes to include technology in various health practice settings (outpatient, inpatient, community health). Change management, quality assurance, and system redesign is introduced. By end of course, students will begin identifying a topic for their final informatics immersion project.

    3

    HCI505

    Foundational Data Analytics

    This course explores data literacy, visual literacy and how outcomes are dependent upon the integrity of data, the analysis of data and the need for clearly defined report writing. Students will manipulate data for analysis and interpretation in order to effectively conduct and/or contribute to data analytics projects.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • HCI651 Database Management for Evidence-Based Decision Making
  • 3

    HCI506

    Health Policy and Informatics

    This course will explore health care policy and how it relates to informatics. Students will describe the history and development of health care policy while comparing U.S. health care policies to other countries. Legal, privacy, storage, and security issues will be discussed regarding healthcare and genomic data.

    3

    HCI507

    Informatics Immersion

    This course leads students to combine management and technical skills to solve real problems regarding healthcare information systems and use of technology in a healthcare setting. The immersion project requires the application of principles in health systems, information technology, healthcare delivery and project management. Students must complete 80-100 internship hours.

    3

    HCI525

    Advanced Analytics

    This course builds upon HCI505 by assisting students to advance their knowledge and skills regarding analytical methods. Using tableau, students will obtain a higher level of understanding in applying and manipulating advanced visual analytics while being introduced to machine learning with "R".

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • HCI505 Foundational Data Analytics
  • 3

    HCI582

    Project Management II

    This course emphasizes the concepts/theories/practices in handling the fiscal and leadership responsibilities of project management related to informatics. By the end of this course, students will have developed their Informatics Immersion Project proposal. Students must complete 40 internship hours under the supervision of a mentor in the field of informatics.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • HCI504 Project Management I
  • 3

    HCI583

    Virtual Engagement to Improve Health

    This course introduces students to a virtual world where technology is driving change, impacting the way healthcare is delivered and managed through the use of the Internet, social media and mobile technologies. Students will engage in virtual activities that transform the traditional roles of interprofessional healthcare providers.

    3

    HCI631

    Integrating Technology into a Healthcare Environment

    This course will introduce students to key factors to be considered when integrating new technology within a healthcare environment. Understanding how to successfully create change, define current process, design future processes and complete a gap analysis using the four stages of a systems life cycle to successfully integrate or change technology.

    3

    HCI651

    Database Management for Evidence-Based Decision Making

    This course will assist the student in understanding the various database systems used within a healthcare setting. Key to this course is understanding how healthcare professionals can collect and extract data from database systems to assess the organizations performance and impact on patient outcomes.

    Co-requisites

    • HCI631 Integrating Technology into a Healthcare Environment
    3

    HIS100

    Introduction to World History

    This course is an introduction to world history from the rise of civilization to the present. It establishes and compares major themes in the leading civilizations of today’s world. It investigates the development of the modern world system and interpretations of its impact on these civilizations.

    3

    HIS102

    Introduction to American History

    This course examines significant areas in the development of American society from the Colonial period to the present. It focuses particularly on the issues of gender, class, race, religion, politics, and ideology to provide students with the grounding in those areas crucial to understanding today's society.

    3

    HIS200W

    Introduction to Latin American History

    This course surveys Latin American history from colonization through the present with an emphasis on world history themes. While the legacies of the colonial period will be briefly examined, the course will focus primarily on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Global themes will include the spread of European religions among indigenous populations; reverberation of liberal revolutionary ideas in the western hemisphere; the incorporation of Latin American and its populations into the world economy; the influence of race on society; and the spread of Marxism and resulting revolutions.

    3

    HIS200W

    Revolutions in Latin America

    This course surveys Latin American history from colonization through the present with an emphasis on world history themes. While the legacies of the colonial period will be briefly examined, the course will focus primarily on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Global themes will include the spread of European religions among indigenous populations; reverberation of liberal revolutionary ideas in the western hemisphere; the incorporation of Latin American and its populations into the world economy; the influence of race on society; and the spread of Marxism and resulting revolutions.

    3

    HIS201

    Modern Middle East

    This course introduces students to the cultural, religious, social, economic and political landscape of the Middle East. It provides an in-depth look at 'traditional' society, state and culture and then highlights change and resistance to change in the period since the First World War, when European imperialism redrew the political map and westernization threatened to redraw social, cultural and religious maps.

    3

    HIS201W

    Modern Middle East

    This course introduces students to the cultural, religious, social, economic and political landscape of the Middle East. It provides an in-depth look at 'traditional' society, state and culture and then highlights change and resistance to change in the period since the First World War, when European imperialism redrew the political map and westernization threatened to redraw social, cultural and religious maps.

    3

    HIS202W

    Introduction to Modern Europe

    The impact of World War I on Europe, the crisis of democracy and rise of totalitarian ideologies in the interwar period, and the decline of European influence in the world after World War II provide the focal points of the course. It then explores the slow resurgence of Europe, prospects for European unity, and revived European influence in international relations as a "third force."

    3

    HIS202W

    Modern Europe

    The impact of World War I on Europe, the crisis of democracy and rise of totalitarian ideologies in the interwar period, and the decline of European influence in the world after World War II provide the focal points of the course. It then explores the slow resurgence of Europe, prospects for European unity, and revived European influence in international relations as a "third force."

    3

    HIS204W

    Introduction to East Asian Studies

    An exploration of East Asian geography, history, language, and culture frim Zhou Dynasty (ca. 1,000 BCE) to present times. Focus on China, Korea, Japan with reference to neighboring regions and discussion of Taiwan. Emphasis on arts, ideologies, and East Asian cultural sites in Pittsburgh area.

    3

    HIS204W

    East Asian Studies

    An exploration of East Asian geography, history, language, and culture frim Zhou Dynasty (ca. 1,000 BCE) to present times. Focus on China, Korea, Japan with reference to neighboring regions and discussion of Taiwan. Emphasis on arts, ideologies, and East Asian cultural sites in Pittsburgh area.

    3

    HIS205W

    Africa, Past and Present

    This course is an interdisciplinary examination of the problems and promises of African development. It investigates the historical development of pre-independence society, culture, political institutions, and economic structures, and their interaction with post-independent economic problems and development strategies.

    3

    HIS207

    Oral History, Neighborhoods, & Race

    Through this course, students will learn about oral history and the racial dynamics of American cities, especially Pittsburgh, since World War II. Students will learn about the history of racial inequality in cities and the efforts of people to both combat and maintain that inequality. They will then conduct oral history interviews to further explore the role the lives of people in two neighborhoods in Pittsburgh.

    3

    HIS213

    Special Topics

    Special Topics

    3

    HIS215

    Ind & the Working Class in Europe & America

    This course seeks to understand who built America, under what conditions they labored, and to understand their hopes, dreams, and struggles to create a better future for themselves and their families. The course traces the historical development of the American working class from colonial times to the present. Particular attention is given to the formation of working class political and economic organizations and their impact on American history.

    3

    HIS216

    Rise of the Third World

    The emergence of Third-Worldism after 1945 is the central historical development of the twentieth century. The Afro-Asian movement namely aimed at recasting the historical initiative away from implacable colonialist powers. This course focuses on the analysis of doctrines and models that have collectively marked the rise of the Third World.

    3

    HIS224

    The Holocaust: Nazis, Occupied Europe, The Jews

    This course surveys the destruction of two-thirds of European Jewry during World War II. Through a close reading of primary texts and secondary sources, it explores the foundations and development of Nazi policy toward the Jews. The course documents the reactions of Jews, European peoples and governments, the U.S. people and government, and various churches and political movements.

    3

    HIS228

    Recent African History

    Western media typically paints a catastrophic view of Africa with stories of conflicts, environmental degradation, horrendous sanitary conditions, and their corollaries. Are the positive trends regarding economic growth, democratization, and endogenous creativity bring overlooked? The course tackles this question while offering opportunities to gain substantial, practical knowledge about contemporary Africa.

    3

    HIS230

    History of Social & Political Thought

    History of Ideas surveys some fundamental normative questions that have been formulated in religion, politics, the Arts, and popular culture from Plato (5th century BC) to the present. It examines principles and methods of political and social thought as they relate to authority, obedience, freedom, equality, and justice.

    3

    HIS231

    History of the British Empire

    History of the British Empire examines the historical narratives relating to imperialism, ethnocentrism, military aggressions, colonization, acculturation, repression of revolt, technological diffusion, intellectual outreach, and cross-cultural fertilization from the beginning of the reign of Queen Elizabeth I in 1558 to the return of Hong Kong to China in 1997.

    3

    HIS234

    Asian Foodways

    A strategic survey of Japanese, Chinese/Taiwanese, Korean, and South Asian food ways in their originating contexts and the U.S. Emphasis on anthropological understanding of food ways, cultural studies critique of class, gender, and family dynamics articulated via food, and historical transformations of food culture in response to migration and globalization.

    3

    HIS241

    History of Islam

    This course is a historical examination of classical Islamic civilization: its origins, nature, and development. Special attention is given to the religion of Islam and the contributions of Arabs, Persians, and Turks to Islamic civilization. Cross-listed as REL 241.

    3

    HIS247

    American Environmental History

    Environmental history examines human interaction with their environment over time, a relationship shaped by cultures and political economies. In US history, there have been competing ideologies of capitalist exploitation, conservationism, preservationism, and sustainability. The course will also introduce students to different facets and methods of environmental history.

    3

    HIS250

    History of Christianity

    This course provides students with a broad historical overview of Christianity, its origins, nature, and development. Students analyze primary sacred and historical texts in addition to historical scholarship on the religion.

    3

    HIS257

    The Sixties, Vietnam & America

    This course examines the 1960s in America and Vietnam. The course focuses on the war in Vietnam from multiple perspectives including those of Vietnamese and American leaders and ordinary people, examining the roots of the conflict and how it shaped lives and the path of history.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • HIS100 Introduction to World History
  • HIS102 Introduction to American History
  • IND108 Gender and Contemporary Social Issues
  • 3

    HIS263

    Gender and the Family in America

    In every era of US history, family and gender have been subject to and shaped by other forced in society, such as religion, politics, and the economy. This course traces the history of social construction of family and gender from the antebellum period to the twentieth century. Attention will be paid to changing concepts of family roles, gender roles, and sexuality over time.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • HIS100 Introduction to World History
  • HIS102 Introduction to American History
  • 3

    HIS283

    Religious Movements in Contemporary Africa

    This is an interdisciplinary exploration of religious experimentation and innovation in modern African history. The course focuses on enterprises that intensify the production and reinvention of sacred ceremonies, legendary narratives, social norms, ritualistic language, and forms of political participation.

    3

    HIS283

    Religious Movements in the Global South

    This is an interdisciplinary exploration of religious experimentation and innovation in modern African history. The course focuses on enterprises that intensify the production and reinvention of sacred ceremonies, legendary narratives, social norms, ritualistic language, and forms of political participation.

    3

    HIS307

    Oral History, Neighborhoods, and Race

    Through this course, students will learn about oral history and the racial dynamics of American cities, especially Pittsburgh, since World War II. Students will learn about the history of racial inequality in cities and the efforts of people to both combat and maintain that inequality. They will then conduct oral history interviews to further explore the role the lives of people in two neighborhoods in Pittsburgh.

    3

    HIS309

    Digital Local History

    This course examines current methods and technologies used in the production of digital history, with a particular focus on incorporating local history resources into on-line historical media.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • HIS102 Introduction to American History
  • 3

    HIS321

    The Sixties, America & Vietnam

    This course examines the 1960s in America and Vietnam. The course focuses on the war in Vietnam from multiple perspectives including those of Vietnamese and American leaders and ordinary people, examining the roots of the conflict and how it shaped lives and the path of history.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • HIS100 Introduction to World History
  • HIS102 Introduction to American History
  • IND108 Gender and Contemporary Social Issues
  • 3

    HIS328

    Recent African History and NGO Networks

    Western media typically paints a catastrophic view of Africa with stories of conflicts, environmental degradation, horrendous sanitary conditions, and their corollaries. Are the positive trends regarding economic growth, democratization, and endogenous creativity bring overlooked? The course tackles this question while offering opportunities to gain substantial, practical knowledge about contemporary Africa.

    3

    HIS342

    Post/Modern China: Digital Storytelling

    An examination of Chinese cultural history from early 1900s to early 2000s, via literature and film, with training in digital storytelling techniques. Discussion of this dramatic national narrative framed by political and aesthetic considerations. Our interpretation and transmission of these narratives framed also by ethics and efficacy.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ENG105 First - Year Communication Seminar
  • 3

    HIS351

    Asian Migrations: Local and Global Narratives

    Study of diasporic waves arising in Vietnam, Nepal, India, China, Japan, Korea, etc., and flowing to the US (especially Western Pennsylvania) and elsewhere. Graphic novels, lyric tales, gender and class, emigrant-immigrant and rural-urban transitions, viewed from Cultural Studies and historical perspectives. Assignments include analyses, an interview, and a communication project.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • ENG105 First - Year Communication Seminar
  • 3

    HIS352

    Asian Migrations Field Experience

    This course facilitates direct interaction with and contribution to Asian American community organizations. Through their contributions to non-profit service programs, students gain deeper understanding of specific Asian American communities, their strengths, and their needs. Students also develop skill in addressing different audiences in a professional manner.

    1

    HIS363

    Gender and the Family in America

    In every era the family has served as a basic human institution, but it has always been subject to other forces in society, such as religion, politics, and the economy. This course traces the history of the American family from the antebellum period to the twentieth century. It examines changes in relationships within the family (parents/children, husbands/wives) and the changing role of the family in society. Particular attention will be paid to the role of the family in defining gender roles and the effects of other institutions upon the family.

    3

    HIS490

    Integrative Capstone

    The integrative capstone, undertaken by the student during the senior year, is an extended project that helps the student complete their transition from an undergraduate student to a world-ready professional. The study usually centers on the student's major and may be conducted, at least in part, in the context of a group experience. Such programs are crafted to meet the unique needs of each major, and could include, for example, fieldwork, theater production, creative work in the arts, independent research, or independent readings. The integrative capstone in an interdisciplinary major must have the approval of both academic programs.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • POL311 Selected Topics in Social Science Research
  • POL311W Selected Topics in Social Science Research
  • 3

    HIS493

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    HIS498

    Tutorial: History

    Tutorial: History

    4

    HIS499

    Tutorial: History

    Tutorial: History

    4

    HON100

    Introduction to the Honors Program

    This course is required for all first-year Honors students. Topics covered include the requirements of the Honors Program, soft skills development, the pillars of the Honors Program (Leadership, Research, and Engagement), and professional development.

    1

    HON200

    Introduction to Research Methods

    This course introduces students to all phases of research as conceptualization of the research question to the interpretation of results. Topics include why and how to conduct research, the scientific method, issues key to research (research design, causation, data collection). Statistical software packages and basic statistical analysis will be covered.

    3

    HRA330SLU

    Occupational Safety, Health and Security

    OCICU course taught at Saint Leo University

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    HS224RU

    History of US Since 1865

    OCICU course taught at Regis University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    HSAM1250RMU

    Health Services Administration I

    OCICU course taught at Robert Morris University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    HSC100

    Introduction to the Health Professions

    Introduction to the Health Professions explores a variety of health professions along with the roles and responsibilities of a health care professional. Students will interact with health care professionals and do self-exploration of their own career interests. They will be introduced to aspects of being a health care professional including integrity, leadership, ethics, cultural competency, and communication.

    1

    HSC201

    Health Literacy: A Primer for Health Care Professionals

    This one credit course focuses on the concept of health literacy. Students will be provided an opportunity to explore the influence of health literacy on health care decisions. Both challenges and opportunities for health care professionals will be analyzed. Strategies for promoting informed consumers of health-related information will be introduced.

    1

    HSC205

    Emotional Competence

    Students will be provided an opportunity to explore emotionally competent behaviors that are vital to therapeutic interactions within the health care environment. Both challenges and opportunities for health care professionals will be assessed.

    1

    HSC210

    Climate Change & Human Health

    This one-credit course provides a basic understanding of climate change and its influence on human health in the 21st century.

    1

    HSC210

    Introduction to Climate Change and Health

    This one-credit course provides a basic understanding of climate change and its influence on human health in the 21st century.

    1

    HSC633I

    Global Health Perspectives Part One

    This course is intended to provide an opportunity for occupational therapy students to study and experience global health issues by participating in an international fieldwork experience. Not everything that is germane to understanding global health can be covered in a single elective course; this experience is intended to give students the opportunity to 1) understand the culture and contemporary health care issues of the visiting country 2) illustrate the role or potential role of occupational therapy in contributing to the health and wellbeing of the population and 3) reflect on their personal growth and on the sustainability of their service.

    1

    HSC633II

    Global Health Perspectives Part Two

    This course is intended to provide an opportunity for occupational therapy students to study and experience global health issues by participating in an international fieldwork experience. Not everything that is germane to understanding global health can be covered in a single elective course; this experience is intended to give students the opportunity to 1) understand the culture and contemporary health care issues of the visiting country 2) illustrate the role or potential role of occupational therapy in contributing to the health and wellbeing of the population and 3) reflect on their personal growth and on the sustainability of their service.

    1

    HSC634I

    Global Health I

    This course provides opportunity for students to study and experience global health issues through international experience. Students have the opportunity to understand culture and healthcare abroad, analyze the role of health professionals in contributing to the health and wellbeing of the population, and personally reflect on the impact of the experience.

    1

    HSC634II

    Global Health II

    This course provides the opportunity for students to study and experience global health issues through international experience. Students have the opportunity to understand culture and healthcare abroad, analyze the role of health professionals in contributing to the health and wellbeing of the population, and personally reflect on the impact of the experience.

    1

    HSCI4310UIW

    Healthcare Policy

    OCICU course taught at University of the Incarnate World.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    HSCI4430UIW

    Health Science Research Methods

    OCICU course taught at University of the Incarnate World.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    HTY122SLU

    US History Since 1865

    OCICU course taught at Saint Leo University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    HU366RU

    Leading Lives that Matter

    OCICU course taught at Regis University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    HU421ERU

    Myth, Symbols, and Culture

    OCICU course taught at Regis University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    HU475RU

    Our Common Home: Religion, Animals, and the Environment

    OCICU course taught at Regis University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    IAR105

    Environment and Behavior

    Intended for interior architecture majors or potential majors, this course introduces students to significant theories concerning the interaction of people and interior architecture. Emphasis is placed on shared human needs and differences based on age, culture, gender, and occupation.

    3

    IAR202

    Theory of Interior Architecture Studio

    This course is intended only for majors or potential majors and cultivates the ability to use formal architectural ordering to develop creative abstract designs that translate into three-dimensional compositions of space and form. Architectural theories and manifestos are explored through process tools and applied utilizing design exercises and projects.

    3

    IAR210

    Drafting Studio

    Intended for interior architecture majors or potential majors, this course develops graphic literacy as a language and philosophy for observation, analysis, expression, and presentation of interior architecture. An understanding is developed of architectural scale, plans, elevations, and sections. Additional fee(s): applied art fee.

    3

    IAR210

    2D Visual Communication

    This course develops graphic literacy as a language and philosophy for observation, analysis, expression, and presentation of interior architecture. Students will develop an understanding of design thinking and visualization and the skills needed to generate design drawings communicating interior environments. One-point, two-point, isometric, and axonometric drawing methods will be covered.

    3

    IAR213

    Special Topics

    Special Topics

    3

    IAR214

    Digital Visualization I

    This course explores design principles related to color theory, typography, branding, web design, print design and layout relative to portfolio design, interior design presentation, communication and development. This course also explores basic human centered design and product design principles as a basis for portfolio and visual design. This course is designed to aid and mentor students in assembling a design portfolio for their academic and professional work. Students will learn graphic design techniques for both print and web including basic tools in Adobe Creative Suite.

    3

    IAR215

    Digital Drawing

    Students learn the basic computer drafting and drawing skills associated with AutoCAD software. Projects include creating new work from scratch and working from existing files. An understanding of drawing layers, detailing, layout, and printing will be presented. Pre-requisite: IAR 210 or permission of instructor. Additional Fee: Course Computing fee.

    3

    IAR215

    Digital Visualization II

    Students learn the basic computer drafting and drawing skills associated with AutoCAD software. Projects include creating work from scratch and working from existing files. An understanding of drawing layers, detailing, layout, and printing will be presented. Adobe Creative Suite and other rending software are covered. Additional Fee: Course Computing Fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • IAR219 Drawing and Model Making
  • 3

    IAR218

    Building Codes

    Students learn and apply relevant building codes as they relate tot he health and life safety of the occupant. This course addresses energy laws, the principles of universal design and accessible code compliance.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 2 of the following courses:
  • IAR220 Interior Architecture I
  • IAR235 Construction Methods
  • IAR220 Interior Architecture II
  • 3

    IAR219

    Drawing and Model Making

    Students will develop the skills needed to generate design drawings using markers and colored pencils which communicate interior environments. One-point, two-point, isometric, and axonometric drawing methods will be covered. Students will explore three-dimensional model making techniques.

    3

    IAR219

    Drafting and Model Making

    Intended for interior architecture majors or potential majors, this course develops graphic literacy as a language and philosophy for observation, analysis, expression, and presentation of interior architecture. An understanding is developed of architectural scale, plans, elevations, and sections. Students will explore three-dimensional model making techniques.

    3

    IAR220

    Interior Architecture I

    This studio addresses problem identification and problem solving in the context of small scale projects of modest scope. Emphasis is placed on human factors, space planning, spatial experience, scale, materials, furniture, fixtures, equipment, and color with respect to user needs.

    Co-requisites

    3

    IAR220

    Interior Architecture II

    This studio addresses problem identification and problem solving in the context of small to medium scale projects of modest scope. Emphasis is placed on human factors, space planning, spatial experience, scale, materials, furniture, fixtures, equipment, and color with respect to user needs.

    3

    IAR225

    Interior Architecture II

    This studio addresses problem identification and problem solving in the context of small scale projects of modest scope. Emphasis is placed on human factors, space planning, spatial experience, scale, materials, furniture, fixtures, equipment, and color with respect to user needs. Additional Fee: Course Computing fee.

    3

    IAR230

    Interior Materials

    This course is intended only for interior architecture majors or potential majors and addresses architectural materials and finishes. Students learn to select, specify and apply architectural finishes. They create specifications, execute take-offs, and produce cost estimates for interior construction. Manufacturing processes, installation methods, maintenance requirements, code regulations, and testing standards are covered.

    3

    IAR231

    Green & Sustainable Design

    Global issues of energy use, resource depletion, and indoor air quality have promoted design professionals to re-evaluate design and construction processes. This course provides students with the knowledge of the US Green Building Council (USGBC) and Environmental Design (LEED) certification system to promote environmentally responsible design.

    3

    IAR232

    Color and Textiles

    The first part of this course examines theories of color in relation to light and space. In the second part, key topics include the selection, specification and application of textiles based on their properties and performance criteria, sustainability, installation methods, maintenance requirements, and regulations and standards.

    3

    IAR232

    Color and Textiles Studio I

    The first part of this residential studio examines theories of color in relation to light and space. In the second part, key topics include the selection, specification and application of textiles based on their properties and performance criteria, sustainability, installation methods, maintenance requirements, and regulations and standards.

    3

    IAR257

    20th- and 21st-Century Architecture

    This course is designed to relate the impact of architecture on both public and private spaces throughout the twentieth century and provide a view towards the future of architecture in the twenty-first century. The course will guide you through the major styles of architecture of the twentieth century and investigate the socio-historic context of the works and determinants of that architecture. Emphasis will also be placed on the interior spaces, furnishings and the arts and artists of the day.

    3

    IAR257W

    20th- and 21st- Century Architecture

    This course is designed to relate the impact of architecture on both public and private spaces throughout the twentieth century and provide a view towards the future of architecture in the twenty-first century. The course will guide you through the major styles of architecture of the twentieth century and investigate the socio-historic context of the works and determinants of that architecture. Emphasis will also be placed on the interior spaces, furnishings and the arts and artists of the day.

    3

    IAR259

    History of Interior Architecture: pre-20th Century

    This survey course examines world architecture from prehistoric times through the 19th century, including the built environment of Europe, the Middle East, Asia, and the Americas. Emphasis is placed on the role of interior spaces, furnishings, and art within architecture.

    3

    IAR259W

    History of Interior Architecture: Pre-20th Century

    This survey course examines world architecture from prehistoric times through the 19th century, including the built environment of Europe, the Middle East, Asia, and the Americas. Emphasis is placed on the role of interior spaces, furnishings, and art within architecture.

    3

    IAR260

    Fallingwater Studio Residency

    As a studio residency at Frank Lloyd Wright's Fallingwater, students develop and apply design thinking and visualization through the exploration and application of sustainable strategies, architectural theories, manifestos, and phenomenology. Student outcomes are the culmination of observations, hikes, lectures, reading, discussions, critiques and design charrettes resulting in a final presentation.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • IAR219 Drawing and Model Making
  • 3

    IAR261W

    History of Interior Architecture: Pre-20th Century

    This survey course examines world architecture from prehistoric times through the 19th century, including the built environment of Europe, the Middle East, Asia, and the Americas. Emphasis is placed on the role of interior spaces, furnishings, and art within architecture.

    3

    IAR262W

    20th and 21st Century Architecture

    This course is designed to relate the impact of architecture on both public and private spaces throughout the twentieth century and provide a view towards the future of architecture in the twenty-first century. The course will guide you through the major styles of architecture of the twentieth century and investigate the socio-historic context of the works and determinants of that architecture. Emphasis will also be placed on the interior spaces, furnishings and the arts and artists of the day.

    3

    IAR310

    Advanced Computer Applications

    This advanced course focuses on Building Information Modeling (BIM) that integrates and synchronizes three-dimensional building modeling for use in all phases of the design process. Students are introduced to Revit and Sketch-up. Graphic rendering skills are also developed to help students communicate interior spaces. Additional Fee: Course Computing fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 2 of the following courses:
  • IAR215 Digital Drawing
  • IAR210 Drafting Studio
  • 3

    IAR310

    Digital Visualization III

    This advanced course focuses on Building Information Modeling (BIM) that integrates and synchronizes three-dimensional building modeling for use in all phases of the design process. Students are introduced to Revit and Sketch-up. Graphic rendering skills are also developed to help students communicate interior spaces Additional Fee: Course Computing fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • IAR210 Drafting Studio
  • IAR210 2D Visual Communication
  • Complete the following course:
  • IAR215 Digital Drawing
  • 3

    IAR315

    Construction Documents

    Construction techniques are studied through the production of a set of construction documents. Issues addressed include the selection and assembly of materials, construction methods, detailing of interior finish systems and cabinetry, building codes, and accessibility. Additional Fee(s): Course Computing fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 3 of the following courses:
  • IAR335 Lighting & Acoustics
  • IAR310 Advanced Computer Applications
  • IAR225 Interior Architecture II
  • IAR225 Interior Architecture Studio III
  • IAR310 Digital Visualization III
  • 3

    IAR316

    Visual Communication

    This course explores color theories, psychology of color and light, typology, and compositional layout relative to interior design presentation, communication and development. Through a variety of media, techniques and applications of visual composition skills are applied to architectural interiors and exterior context. Additional Fee(s): Course Computing fee

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • IAR320 Interior Architecture III
  • 3

    IAR316

    Portfolio

    This course will allow Interior Architecture students to solidify their professional portfolio for prospective internships and employment. Students will produce a physical and digital portfolio.

    3

    IAR320

    Interior Architecture III

    This advanced studio addresses concept development, design development, and detailing of medium- and large-scale projects. Emphasis is placed on program analysis, user needs, space planning, three-dimensional spatial development, design language and composition, materials and assemblies, color, lighting, acoustics, environmental systems, and building codes and life safety.

    3

    IAR321

    Interior Architecture IV

    This advanced studio addresses concept development, design development, and detailing of medium- and large-scale projects. Emphasis is placed on program analysis, universal design, user needs, space planning, three-dimensional spatial development, design language and composition, materials and assemblies, color, lighting, acoustics, environmental systems, and building codes and life safety.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • IAR225 Interior Architecture II
  • IAR225 Interior Architecture Studio III
  • 3

    IAR325

    Interior Architecture IV

    This advanced studio addresses concept development, design development, and detailing of medium- and large-scale projects. Emphasis is placed on program analysis, user needs, space planning, three-dimensional spatial development, design language and composition, materials and assemblies, color, lighting, acoustics, environmental systems, and building codes and life safety. Additional fee(s): Course Computing fee.

    3

    IAR326

    Interior Architecture V

    This 6-credit advanced studio addresses concept development, design development, and detailing of medium-to-large scale projects. Emphasis is placed on program analysis, user needs, space planning, three-dimensional spatial development, design language and composition, materials, assemblies, color, lighting, acoustics, environmental systems, and building codes and life safety.

    6

    IAR330

    Building Systems

    This course provides an overview of environmental control systems, including HVAC, plumbing, fire protection, power distribution, security, and data/voice telecommunication. Emphasis is placed on energy consumption and conservation, human comfort, and health and safety.

    3

    IAR330

    Construction Systems & Methods

    This course provides an overview of architecture building systems including exterior and interior construction methods and terminology. This course provides an overview of environmental control systems, including HVAC, plumbing, fire protection, power distribution, security, and data/voice telecommunication. Emphasis is placed on energy consumption, conservation, human comfort, and health and safety.

    3

    IAR335

    Lighting & Acoustics

    This course is an introduction to lighting and acoustics. Emphasis is placed on the psychology of lighting, visual comfort criteria, measurement and calculations, available technologies in lighting design, the selection of fixtures, and the application of computer-aided lighting simulation tools. Principles of acoustics, acoustic properties of materials and building systems in relation to building structures, sound transmission between rooms, and design methods in room and building acoustics are also addressed. Additional Fee(s): Course Computing fee.

    3

    IAR440

    Internship

    An internship experience provides students with a greater understanding of professional practice. With instructor approval, students work full-time in an office environment under the supervision of a practitioner.

    3

    IAR441

    Environmental/Sustainable Community Service

    Encouraging environmental stewardship, students are required to participate in an environmental community service project under the supervision of a field leader or faculty member.

    1

    IAR442

    Environmental/Sustainable Community Service

    Encouraging environmental stewardship, students are required to participate in an environmental community service project under the supervision of a field leader or faculty member.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 2

    IAR443

    Environmental/Sustainable Community Service

    Encouraging environmental stewardship, students are required to participate in an environmental community service project under the supervision of a field leader or faculty member.

    3

    IAR443

    Community Service

    Encouraging engagement with the surrounding community, students are required to participate in a community service project under the supervision of a field leader or faculty member.

    1

    IAR445

    Professional Practice

    In this course, students are introduced to the specialized services provided by the professional interior designer. Emphasis is placed on office operations and personnel issues, marketing strategies, project management, contract documents, ethics, and the legal and financial aspects of professional practice.

    3

    IAR470

    Immersive Research Design

    This writing based course introduces research methods and tools as the foundations of evidence based design. This course is a review and analysis of published research in the disciplines of interior design and architecture. Students are introduced to various methods of gathering information and conducting research with emphasis placed on the selection and utilization of data collection strategies and tools, culminating in the development of a research paper.

    3

    IAR490

    Integrative Capstone

    The integrative capstone, undertaken by the student during the senior year, is an extended project that helps the student complete their transition from an undergraduate student to a world-ready professional.  The study usually centers on the student’s major and may be conducted, at least in part, in the context of a group experience.  Such programs are crafted to meet the unique needs of each major, and could include, for example, fieldwork, theater production, creative work in the arts, independent research, or independent readings. The integrative capstone in an interdisciplinary major must have the approval of both academic programs.

    3

    IAR491

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    1

    IAR492

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    2

    IAR493

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    IAR498

    Tutorial I: Interior Architecture

    This course is the first part of a year long tutorial that stresses evidence-based design. Students create a program for a project selected by the instructor using the latest research and literature available. The program serves as the foundation for design decision-making in IAR 499. Prerequisite(s): IAR 325

    Co-requisites

    • IAR325 Interior Architecture IV
    4

    IAR499

    Tutorial II: Interior Architecture

    This course is the second part of a year long tutorial that stresses evidence-based design. Using the program developed in IAR 420 as a foundation, students investigate a problem from concept generation through design development and detailing. Prerequisite(s): IAR 498 Additional Fee(s): Course Computing fee.

    4

    IAR502

    Theory of Interior Architecture

    This course cultivates the ability to use formal architectural ordering to develop creative abstract designs that translate into three-dimensional compositions of space and form. Architectural theories and manifestos are explored through process tools and applied utilizing design exercises including concept development, abstract ideation, physical embodiment, architectural composition and analytical review.

    3

    IAR505

    Design and Behavior

    The designed environment influences and is influenced by human activity patterns and behavior. This course is an introduction to significant theories concerning the interaction of people and interior architecture. Emphasis is placed on shared human needs and differences based on age, culture, gender, and occupation.

    3

    IAR510

    Drafting Studio

    This course develops graphic literacy as a language and philosophy for observation, analysis, expression, and presentation of interior architecture. Students are introduced to a number of techniques and methods of drawing used by interior designers, including freehand drawing, use of colored pencils, markers, and mechanical drafting through various exercises. An understanding is developed of architectural scale, plans, elevations, and sections. Additional work is spent on values, colors, palettes, and shadowing techniques that culminate in a final project.

    3

    IAR510

    2D Visual Communications

    Intended for interior architecture majors or potential majors, this course develops graphic literacy as a language and philosophy for observation, analysis, expression, and presentation of interior architecture. An understanding of design thinking and visualization is developed. One-point, two0point, isometric, and axonometric drawing methods will be covered. Additional fee(s): applied art fee.

    3

    IAR514

    Digital Visualization I

    This course explores design principles related to color theory, typography, branding, web design, print design and layout relative to portfolio design, interior design presentation, communication and development. This course also explores basic human centered design and product design principles as a basis for portfolio and visual design. This course is designed to aid and mentor students in assembling a design portfolio of their academic and professional work. Students will learn graphic design techniques for both print and web, including basic tools in the Adobe Creative Suite.

    3

    IAR515

    Digital Drawing

    Students learn the basic computer drafting and drawing skills associated with AutoCAD software. Projects include creating new work from scratch and working from existing files. An understanding of drawing layers, detailing, layout, and printing will be presented. Pre-requisites: IAR 510 or permission from the instructor. Additional fee: Course Computing Fee

    3

    IAR515

    Digital Visualization II

    Students learn the basic computer drafting and drawing skills associated with AutoCAD software. Projects include creating new work and working from existing files. An understanding of drawing layers, detailing, layout, and printing will be presented. Adobe Creative Suite and other rendering software are covered. Additional Fee: Course Computing fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • IAR510 Drafting Studio
  • Complete the following course:
  • IAR510 2D Visual Communications
  • 3

    IAR518

    Building Codes

    Students learn and apply relevant building codes as they relate to the health, safety, and life safety of the occupant. This course addresses energy laws, the principles of Universal design, and accessible code compliance. Pre-requisites: IAR520, IAR535

    3

    IAR519

    Drawing and Model Making

    Students will develop the skills needed to generate design drawings using markers and colored pencils which communicate interior environments. One-point, Two-point, isometric, and axonometric drawing methods will be covered. Students will explore three-dimensional model making techniques. Pre-requisite: IAR510

    3

    IAR519

    Drafting and Model Making

    Intended for interior architecture majors or potential majors. This course develops graphic literacy as a language and philosophy for observation, analysis, expression, and presentation of interior architecture. An understanding is developed of architectural scale, plans, elevations, and sections. Students will explore three-dimensional model making techniques.

    3

    IAR520

    Interior Architecture I

    This studio addresses problem identification and problem solving in the context of small-scale projects of modest scope. Emphasis is placed on human factors, space planning, spatial experience, scale, basic elements of 2-D design, concept development, space planning, scale, textiles, and color with respect to user needs.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 3 of the following courses:
  • IAR510 Drafting Studio
  • IAR519 Drawing and Model Making
  • IAR532 Color and Textiles
  • 3

    IAR520

    Architecture Studio II

    This studio addresses problem identification and problem solving in the context of medium to large-scale projects of modest scope. Emphasis is placed on human factors, space planning, spatial experience, scale, basic elements of 2-D and 3-D design, concept development, space planning, scale, textiles, and color with respect to user needs.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • IAR510 Drafting Studio
  • IAR510 2D Visual Communications
  • Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • IAR519 Drawing and Model Making
  • IAR519 Drafting and Model Making
  • Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • IAR532 Color and Textiles
  • IAR532 Color and Textiles Studio I
  • 3

    IAR525

    Interior Architecture II

    This studio addresses problem identification and problem solving in the context of small scale projects of modest scope. Emphasis is placed on programming human factors, space planning, spatial experience, scale, materials, furniture, fixtures, equipment, and color with respect to user needs. Additional Fee: Course Computing Fee

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 4 of the following courses:
  • IAR515 Digital Drawing
  • IAR520 Interior Architecture I
  • IAR502 Theory of Interior Architecture
  • IAR535 Construction Methods
  • 3

    IAR525

    Interior Architecture Studio III

    The studio addresses problem identification and solutions in the context of medium to-large scale projects of complex scope. Emphasis is placed on programming human factors, universal design principles, space planning, spatial experience, scale, materials, furniture, fixtures, equipment, and color with respect to user needs.

    3

    IAR530

    Interior Materials

    This course is intended for majors or potential majors and addresses architectural materials and finishes. Students learn to select, specify, and apply architectural finishes. They create specifications, execute take-offs, and produce cost estimates for interior construction. Manufacturing processes, installation methods, maintenance requirements, code regulations, and testing standards are covered.

    3

    IAR532

    Color and Textiles

    The first part of this course examines theories of color in relations to light and space. In the second part, key topics include the selection, specification and application of textiles based on their properties and performance criteria, sustainability, installation methods, maintenance requirements, and regulations and standards.

    3

    IAR532

    Color and Textiles Studio I

    The first part of this residential studio examines theories in color in relation to light and space. In the second part, key topics include the selection, specification and application of textiles based on their properties and performance criteria, sustainability, installation methods, maintenance requirements, and regulations and standards.

    3

    IAR535

    Construction Methods

    Intended for interior architecture majors, this course provides an overview of architectural building systems, including exterior and interior construction methods and terminology.

    3

    IAR557

    20th & 21st Century Architecture

    This course is designed to relate the impact of architecture on both public and private spaces throughout the 20th century and provide a view towards the future of architecture in 21st century. The course will guide you through the major styles of architecture of the 20th century and investigate the socio-historic context of the works and determinants of that architecture. Emphasis will also be placed on the interior spaces, furnishings, and the arts and artists of the day.

    3

    IAR559

    History of Interior Architecture

    This survey course examines world architecture from prehistoric times through the 19th century, including the built environment of Europe, the Middle East, Asia, and the Americas. Emphasis is placed on the role of interior spaces, furnishings, and art within architecture.

    3

    IAR561

    History of Interior Architecture

    This survey course examines world architecture from prehistoric times through the 19th century, including the built environment of Europe, the Middle East, Asia, and the Americas. Emphasis is placed on the role of interior spaces, furnishings, and art within architecture.

    3

    IAR562

    20th & 21st Century Architecture

    This course is designed to relate the impact of architecture on both public and private spaces throughout the 20th century and provide a view towards the future of architecture in 21st century. The course will guide you through the major styles of architecture of the 20th century and investigate the socio-historic context of the works and determinants of that architecture. Emphasis will also be placed on the interior spaces, furnishings, and the arts and artists of the day.

    3

    IAR610

    Advanced Computer Applications

    This advanced course focuses on Building Information Modeling (BIM) that integrates and synchronizes three-dimensional building modeling for us in all phases of the design process. Students are instructed to Revit and Sketch-up. Graphic skills are also developed to help students communicate interior design schemes. Additional fees: Course Computing Fee

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • IAR515 Digital Drawing
  • 3

    IAR610

    Digital Visualization III

    This advanced course focuses on Building Information Modeling (BIM) that integrates and synchronizes three-dimensional building modeling for us in all phases of the design process. Students are instructed to Revit and Sketch-up. Graphic skills are also developed to help students communicate interior design schemes. Additional fees: Course Computing Fee

    3

    IAR615

    Construction Documents Studio

    Construction techniques are studied through the production of a set of construction documents. Issues addressed include the selection and assembly of materials, construction methods, detailing of interior finish systems and cabinetry, building codes, and accessibility. Additional Fees: Course Computing Fees

    Co-requisites

    • IAR620 Interior Architecture III
    3

    IAR616

    Visual Communication Studio

    This course explores color theories, typology, branding, graphic organization and compositional layout relative to interior design presentation, communication, and development. Pre-requisite: IAR515, 519, 610. Additional fees: Course Computing Fee

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • IAR620 Interior Architecture III
  • 3

    IAR616

    Portfolio

    This course will allow Interior Architecture students to solidify their professional portfolio for prospective internships and employment. Students will produce a physical and digital portfolio. Additional fees: Course Computing Fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • IAR620 Interior Architecture III
  • Complete the following course:
  • IAR620 Interior Architecture Studio IV
  • 3

    IAR620

    Interior Architecture III

    This advanced studio addresses concept development, design development, and detailing of medium- and large-scale projects. Emphasis is placed on program analysis, user needs, space planning, three-dimensional spatial development, design language and composition, materials and assemblies, color, lighting, acoustics, environmental systems, and building codes and life safety. Additional Fees: Course Computing Fee

    3

    IAR620

    Interior Architecture Studio IV

    This advanced studio addresses concept development, design development, and detailing of medium-to-large scale projects. Emphasis is placed on program analysis, user needs, universal design, space planning, three-dimensional spatial development, design language, composition, materials and assemblies, color, lighting, acoustics, environmental systems, building codes, and life safety. Additional Fees: Course Computing Fee.

    3

    IAR630

    Building Systems

    This course provides an overview of environmental control systems, including HVAC, plumbing, fire protection, power distribution, security, building codes, and data/voice telecommunication. Emphasis is placed on energy consumption and conservation, human comfort, and health and safety. Pre-requisites: IAR 535, 518

    3

    IAR631

    Design for Sustainability

    Global issues of energy use, resource depletion, and indoor air quality have prompted design professionals to re-evaluate design and construction processes. This course provides students with the knowledge of the US Green Building Council (USGBC) and Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification system to promote environmentally responsible design.

    3

    IAR635

    Lighting and Acoustics Studio

    This course is an introduction to lighting and acoustics. Emphasis is placed on the psychology of lighting, visual comfort criteria, measurement and calculations, available technologies in lighting design, the selection of fixtures, and the application of computer aided lighting simulation tools. Principles of acoustics, acoustic properties of materials and building systems in relation to building structures, sound transmission between rooms, and design methods in room and building acoustics are also addressed. Pre- requisites: IAR 525, 515. Additional Fees: Course Computing Fee

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 3 of the following courses:
  • IAR515 Digital Drawing
  • IAR502 Theory of Interior Architecture
  • IAR520 Interior Architecture I
  • 3

    IAR640

    Internship

    An internship experience provides students with a greater understanding of professional practice. With instructor approval, students work full-time in an office environment under the supervision of a practitioner. Pre-Requisite: IAR620. Co-Requisite: IAR645

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • IAR525 Interior Architecture II
  • 6

    IAR641

    Internship

    An internship experience provides students with a greater understanding of professional practice. With instructor approval, students work full-time in an office environment under the supervision of a practitioner.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    IAR642

    Internship

    Internship

    2

    IAR643

    Internship

    Internship

    1

    IAR645

    Professional Practice

    In this course, students are introduced to the specialized services provided by the professional interior designer. Emphasis is placed on office operations and personnel issues, marketing strategies, project management, contract documents, ethics, and the legal and financial aspects of professional practice.

    3

    IAR650

    Interior Architecture V: Capstone Studio

    This course stresses evidence-based design. Students create a program for a project selected by the instructor using the latest research and literature available. The program and research findings serve as a foundation for the investigation of a design problem from concept generation through design development and detailing. Additional fees: Course Computing Fee

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 5 of the following courses:
  • IAR620 Interior Architecture III
  • IAR615 Construction Documents Studio
  • IAR630 Building Systems
  • IAR631 Design for Sustainability
  • IAR655 Graduate Research Methods
  • 6

    IAR650

    Interior Architecture V: Capstone Studio

    This course stresses evidence-based design. Students create a program for a project influenced by their research in IAR655. The program and research findings serve as a foundation for the investigation of a design detailing. Additional fees: Course Computing Fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • IAR620 Interior Architecture III
  • IAR620 Interior Architecture Studio IV
  • Complete all 4 of the following courses:
  • IAR615 Construction Documents Studio
  • IAR630 Building Systems
  • IAR631 Design for Sustainability
  • IAR655 Graduate Research Methods
  • 3

    IAR655

    Graduate Research Methods

    This graduate seminar is a review and analysis of published research in the disciplines of interior design and architecture. Students are introduced to various methods for gathering information and conducting research with emphasis placed on the selection and utilization of data collection strategies and tools, culminating in the development of a research proposal. Cross listed as LAR680 and LNS680

    3

    IAR661

    Interior Architecture Inquiry

    This course will introduce students to architectural theory through specific readings that will enable them to establish basic critical reasoning skills utilizing theoretical works. the course will focus on reading and discussing seminal texts while understanding their historical importance to architecture and interior design.

    3

    IAR662

    Issues in Interior Architecture

    Students are introduced to current writings and discussion related to sustainability and globalization, which are then analyzed for their relevance to the decisions made by interior architects. An awareness of current issues and how the student may impact them provides a framework as students engage in research for their thesis.

    3

    IAR665

    Special Topics in Interior Architecture

    Theory, research, and application are stressed in relation to interior architecture through various course topics. Special topics may include design and culture, design for special populations, design for specific building types, programming, post occupancy evaluation, and historic preservation.

    3

    IAR670

    Supervised Teaching

    Students have the opportunity to assist with a class in interior architecture under the supervision of a faculty member.

    3

    IAR675

    Independent Study

    In-depth investigation conducted independently by the student under the supervision of an instructor. This course may be taken to satisfy an elective requirement.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    IAR680

    Thesis Development

    The thesis is independently taken by a student under the guidance of a thesis committee. The final project is a written thesis with original research or a creative design project that is supported by in-depth information gathering and written material.

    3

    IAR681

    Thesis

    The thesis is independently taken by a student under the guidance of a thesis committee. The final project is a written thesis with original research or a creative design project that is supported by in-depth information gathering and written material.

    3

    IAR691

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 1

    IAR692

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 2

    IAR693

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    IAR800

    Graduate Continuing Credit

    Graduate Continuing Credit

    1

    IDS210HMSLU

    Once Upon A Time: Readings in Folklore and Culture

    OCICU course taught at Saint Leo University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    IHS360

    Women's Integrative Health

    This course addresses women‘s health issues from a holistic perspective including diet, exercise, stress management, dietary supplements, body therapies and alternative medical systems as well as conventional medicine.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 4 of the following courses:
  • IHS150 Introduction to Integrative Health Studies
  • IHS200W Integrative Nutrition
  • IHS210 Dietary Supplements and Botanical Medicine
  • IHS220 Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine
  • 3

    IHS492

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 2

    IHS493

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    IHS498

    Tutorial

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 4

    IHS499

    Tutorial

    4

    IMM103

    Immersive Media I

    Students receive an introduction to 3d modeling, programming, architectural and design theory, and start learning the skills and technology necessary to build immersive experiences.

    3

    IMM202

    Immersive Media II

    Students learn advanced immersive environment design processes and technology by learning how to deploy projects for a variety of immersive platforms. Projects will focus on using immersive technologies to explore designing virtual environments.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • IMM103 Immersive Media I
  • 3

    IMM215

    Programming for Immersive Experiences

    This course provides an introduction to programming for immersive experiences using real-time software and programming languages. Students will learn interaction scripting, game engine class structures, planning and documenting a significant programming project, learn to work on a programming project in teams, and learn to use industry standard development tools.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • IMM103 Immersive Media I
  • 3

    IMM220

    Studio I - 3D Interfaces & User Experience

    Students learn 3D modeling techniques for environment design, interface and user experience design, and prop design. Using both traditional desktop 3D modeling software and immersive 3D modeling software students will create a variety of 3D models and interfaces for use in immersive experiences.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 2 of the following courses:
  • IMM202 Immersive Media II
  • IMM215 Programming for Immersive Experiences
  • 3

    IMM240

    Immersive Design Seminar

    The Immersive Design Seminar explores the influence of other design fields and design practices on immersive design while examining current cultural, ethical, and social issues affecting immersive work.

    3

    IMM250

    Human Centered Design

    Students will learn the principles of human centered design in order to develop empathy for the people they design for. They will use HCD methods to generate ideas; build prototypes; share their designs; and create a project informed by their designs.

    3

    IMM310

    Studio II - Architecture and Environments

    Students apply knowledge gained from introductory Immersive Media and design courses to create immersive environments informed by architectural theory. This course will leverage a variety of 3D, immersive, and game engine software.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • IMM220 Studio I - 3D Interfaces & User Experience
  • 6

    IMM370

    Studio III - Simulation and Training

    Students will examine the uses of immersive media in the fields of simulation and training. They will learn simulation and training experience theory through an analysis of existing experiences and through a series of practical group projects developing experiences for these fields.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 2 of the following courses:
  • IMM220 Studio I - 3D Interfaces & User Experience
  • IMM310 Studio II - Architecture and Environments
  • 6

    IMM405

    Studio IV - Prototyping for Advanced Systems

    Students will be given the opportunity to develop immersive experiences for high-end, experimental, and prototype equipment that is only available to students in this course and later studios. Students will learn how to work with complex immersive equipment systems and early access software in a collaborative studio environment.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 2 of the following courses:
  • IMM220 Studio I - 3D Interfaces & User Experience
  • IMM310 Studio II - Architecture and Environments
  • 6

    IMM455

    Studio V - Ethics and Access

    This studio course explores the ethical and accessibility issues surrounding immersive technologies through the design and development of immersive experiences that seeks to address these issues.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • IMM220 Studio I - 3D Interfaces & User Experience
  • IMM310 Studio II - Architecture and Environments
  • 6

    IMM470

    Immersive Design Research

    This course gives students an opportunity to conduct research using human centered design methods and research methods to craft a plan for their final semester Studio VI course.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 3 of the following courses:
  • ENG355 Advanced Writing and Stylistics
  • IMM220 Studio I - 3D Interfaces & User Experience
  • IMM250 Human Centered Design
  • 3

    IND101

    Transitions: Essential Skills for Academic Achievement at Chatham

    This course introduces students to the essential skills necessary for successful learning in college. Students practice and demonstrate mastery of the skills within the contexts of the academic courses in which they are currently enrolled. Skills areas include: navigating the college environment, identifying goals, reading efficiently, managing time, controlling procrastination, taking notes and tests, and thinking critically. Students attend one group hour and one individual hour per week.

    1

    IND101

    Foundations of Learning: Theory & Application

    In this course, students will learn the science behind how our brains learn, the significance of a growth-mindset, and how to become creators of their own success through active learning. Additionally, students will learn practical and engaging strategies for note-taking, active reading, time management, test-taking, and other study strategies.

    1

    IND104

    LSAT Preparation

    This course will help students prepare for the LSAT, by focusing on study skills particular to this examination.

    1

    IND105

    Crime Scene Investigation

    Using concepts from biology, chemistry, and physics, students will learn the basics of forensic procedures, including DNA fingerprinting, organic and inorganic analysis, arson investigation, and trace evidence. The course will focus on relevance and implications of evidence for a criminal trial and how to process the evidence at a crime scene.

    3

    IND105L

    Crime Scene Investigation Lab

    Using concepts from biology, chemistry, and physics, students will learn the basics of forensic procedures, including DNA fingerprinting, organic and inorganic analysis, arson investigation, and trace evidence. The course will focus on relevance and implications of evidence for a criminal trial and how to process the evidence at a crime scene. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory Fee

    1

    IND106

    Dialogues Seminar

    1

    IND108

    Gender and Contemporary Social Issues

    3

    IND113

    Special Topics

    A foundation of knowledge for traveling to Costa Rica for CSA341: Chatham Abroad: Central America: Costa Rica-Special Topics in Sustainability. The history of Costa Rica is explored, emphasizing the nation's push for more sustainable practices. Introduction to Spanish Language and best international traveling practices are also discussed.

    1

    IND115

    Global Focus Seminar

    This one-credit seminar is intended to foster student intellectual involvement in the Chatham Global Focus Program. Course participants attend a series of Global Focus events, lectures, and programs, and complete a specified number of assignments.

    1

    IND123

    Prototyping & Design for Product Development

    This course is designed for students with little or no background in design or product development. It provides an introductory explanation of the design process, incorporating design thinking and lean entrepreneurship principles, as well as prototyping for developing tangible products.

    1

    IND127

    Drugs Around the World

    One semester lecture course exploring drugs in various cultures around the world. The social, economic, and physical effects of drugs on various communities will be examined. The relationship between cultures of other countries and the United States will be emphasized.

    3

    IND130

    Social Activism Institute

    Through this course, students will learn about service, civic work, and advocacy in specific fields from faculty and a professional in that field. Professionals will provide students with information about their background, professional competencies needed to pursue a career in their field, and the challenges and rewards of their work.

    1

    IND150

    International Program

    International Students enroll in this course as a placeholder until they can complete their registration after they arrive on campus.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 12

    IND170

    FY Research in Science

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    IND175

    Introduction to Nursing Resources

    This course will teach nursing students how to develop and apply skills in locating, evaluating, and synthesizing information from a variety of library and information resources. The work completed in this course will help nursing students become more efficient in areas of evidence-based practice.

    1

    IND210

    Chatham Semester International Internship Preparation Seminar

    This course will prepare international students to conduct an internship search and work in a U.S. for profit or non-profit organization. Students will learn about U.S. workplace culture, U.S. interviewing techniques, networking and job search skills, and developing a professional web presence.

    3

    IND213

    Special Topics

    Special Topics

    3

    IND245

    Fostering Inclusive Communities in Residential Settings

    This course provides Residential Assistants with skills to implement an inclusive community and facilitate interactions with residents. Students will gain understanding of identity development, impact of inequality and privilege in inclusive communities, facilitating conversations in residence halls, and learn ally behaviors effective for residential staff.

    3

    IND246

    Intergroup Dialogue Facilitator Training

    These courses give students a foundation to facilitate intergroup dialogue classes and workshops. The topics of this course include group facilitation skills; individual and group social identity development; impact of prejudice and stereotyping; difference and dominance and the nature of social oppression; culture, culture cues, and judgements.

    3

    IND247

    Intergroup Dialogue Seminar

    Students participate in conversations and readings across social identities, discuss and explore experiences across social identities and institutional contexts, and examine historical, psychological, and sociological materials leading to understanding of self and other. Social identity topics will rotate and focus on one identity (race, class, gender, sexual orientation, etc.).

    3

    IND248

    Practicum in Facilitating Intergroup Dialogues

    This course supports students as they apply and improve their facilitation skills as dialogue course facilitators. It includes supporting students to plan classes in the intergroup dialogues course that they facilitate, deepen their awareness of their identity, and learn to facilitate through conflict.

    4

    IND250

    Careers for the Digital Age

    This course explores computing and digital skills that are essential to professionals in the 21st century across disciplines. Topics include the Internet, mobile technologies, coding, the collection, tracking, management and analytics of Big Data. Students will examine how these digital technologies may transform industries from music to healthcare.

    1

    IND310

    Chatham Semester International Internship Reflection Seminar

    This class will allow international non degree academic students participating in the Chatham Internship to reflect on their internship experience using academic journals and course texts.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • IND210 Chatham Semester International Internship Preparation Seminar
  • 3

    IND350

    Scientific Research Methods

    This course serves as an introduction to research literature and research methodology in the sciences. Students prepare a research proposal including literature review, experimental design and methods, budget, timetable, and bibliography. Other topics include professional presentation techniques and research ethics. The student's major department must approve proposals prior to the Tutorial.

    2

    IND350W

    Scientific Research Methods

    This course serves as an introduction to research literature and research methodology in the sciences. Topics include professional writing, experimental design, presentation techniques, and professional and research ethics. Credit is not given for both IND350W and EXS301W.

    2

    IND491

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 1

    INTACT301

    Internship - Accounting

    Internship - Accounting

    1

    INTACT302

    Internship - Accounting

    Internship - Accounting

    2

    INTACT303

    Internship - Accounting

    Internship - Accounting

    3

    INTACT305

    Internship - Accounting

    5

    INTACT306

    Internship - Accounting

    Internship - Accounting

    6

    INTACT308

    Internship - Accounting

    Internship - Accounting

    8

    INTART301

    Internship - Art

    1

    INTART302

    Internship - Art

    Internship - Art

    2

    INTART303

    Internship - Art

    Internship - Art

    3

    INTART304

    Internship - Art

    Internship - Art

    4

    INTBIO301

    Internship - Biology

    Internship - Biology

    1

    INTBIO302

    Internship - Biology

    Internship - Biology

    2

    INTBIO303

    Internship - Biology

    Internship - Biology

    3

    INTBIO305

    Internship - Biology

    Internship - Biology

    5

    INTBIO307

    Internship - Biology

    7

    INTBIO309

    Internship - Biology

    9

    INTBUS301

    Internship - Business

    1

    INTBUS302

    Internship - Business

    Internship - Business

    2

    INTBUS303

    Internship - Business

    The Chatham University Internship program provides students with the opportunity to acquire hands-on work experience in a professional setting. The student gains metacognitive insights, deep learning, and practical skills by reflecting on the internship experience under the supervision of an academic advisor.

    3

    INTBUS305

    Internship - Business

    Internship - Business

    5

    INTBUS306

    Internship - Business

    Internship - Business

    6

    INTBUS409

    Internship - Business

    9

    INTCHM301

    Internship - Chemistry

    Internship - Chemistry

    1

    INTCHM302

    Internship - Chemistry

    Internship - Chemistry

    2

    INTCHM303

    Internship - Chemistry

    Internship - Chemistry

    3

    INTCOM301

    Internship - Professional Communication

    Internship - Professional Communication

    1

    INTCOM302

    Internship - Professional Communication

    Internship - Professional Communication

    2

    INTCOM303

    Internship - Professional Communication

    Internship - Professional Communication

    3

    INTCOM304

    Internship - Professional Communication

    Internship - Professional Communication

    4

    INTCOM305

    Internship - Professional Communication

    Internship - Professional Communication

    5

    INTCOM306

    Internship - Professional Communication

    Internship - Professional Communication

    6

    INTCRM301

    Internship - Criminology

    Internship - Criminology

    1

    INTCRM302

    Internship - Criminology

    Internship - Criminology

    2

    INTCRM303

    Internship - Criminology

    Internship - Criminology

    3

    INTCRM304

    Internship - Criminology

    Internship - Criminology

    4

    INTCRM306

    Internship - Criminology

    Internship - Criminology

    6

    INTCST301

    Internship - Cultural Studies

    Internship - Cultural Studies

    1

    INTCST302

    Internship - Cultural Studies

    Internship - Cultural Studies

    2

    INTCST303

    Internship - Cultural Studies

    Internship - Cultural Studies

    3

    INTCST304

    Internship - Cultural Studies

    Internship - Cultural Studies

    4

    INTDSA301

    Internship - Data Science Analytics

    Internship - Data Science Analytics

    1

    INTDSA302

    Internship - Data Science Analytics

    Internship - Data Science Analytics

    2

    INTDSA303

    Internship - Data Science Analytics

    Internship - Data Science Analytics

    3

    INTECN301

    Internship - Economics

    Internship - Economics

    1

    INTECN302

    Internship - Economics

    Internship - Economics

    2

    INTECN303

    Internship - Economics

    Internship - Economics

    3

    INTEDU301

    Internship - Education

    Internship - Education

    1

    INTEDU302

    Internship - Education

    Internship - Education

    2

    INTEDU303

    Internship - Education

    Internship - Education

    3

    INTEDU407

    Internship - Education

    Internship - Education

    7

    INTENG301

    Internship - English

    Internship - English

    1

    INTENG302

    Internship - English

    Internship - English

    2

    INTENG303

    Internship - English

    Internship - English

    3

    INTENG304

    Internship - English

    Internship - English

    4

    INTENG305

    Internship - English

    Internship - English

    5

    INTENV301

    Internship - Environmental Studies

    Internship - Environmental Studies

    1

    INTENV302

    Internship - Environmental Studies

    Internship - Environmental Studies

    2

    INTENV303

    Internship - Environmental Studies

    Internship - Environmental Studies

    3

    INTEXS301

    Internship - Exercise Science

    Internship - Exercise Science

    1

    INTEXS302

    Internship - Exercise Science

    Internship - Exercise Science

    2

    INTEXS303

    Internship - Exercise Science

    Internship - Exercise Science

    3

    INTEXS307

    Internship - Exercise Science

    Internship - Exercise Science

    7

    INTEXS309

    Internship - Exercise Science

    Internship - Exercise Science

    9

    INTFDT301

    Internship - Film and Digital Technology

    Internship - Film and Digital Technology

    1

    INTFDT302

    Internship - Film and Digital Technology

    Internship - Film and Digital Technology

    2

    INTFDT303

    Internship - Film and Digital Technology

    Internship - Film and Digital Technology

    3

    INTFDT306

    Internship - Film and Digital Technology

    6

    INTFRN303

    Internship - French

    Internship - French

    3

    INTHIS301

    Internship - History

    Internship - History

    1

    INTHIS302

    Internship - History

    Internship - History

    2

    INTHIS303

    Internship - History

    Internship - History

    3

    INTIAR301

    Internship - Interior Architecture

    Internship - Interior Architecture

    1

    INTIAR302

    Internship - Interior Architecture

    Internship - Interior Architecture

    2

    INTIAR303

    Internship - Interior Architecture

    Internship - Interior Architecture

    3

    INTIHS302

    Internship - Integrative Health Studies

    Internship - Integrative Health Studies

    2

    INTIHS303

    Internship - Integrative Health Studies

    Internship - Integrative Health Studies

    3

    INTISP303

    Internship - International Studies

    Internship - International Studies

    3

    INTMTH301

    Internship - Mathematics

    Internship - Mathematics

    1

    INTMTH302

    Internship - Mathematics

    Internship - Mathematics

    2

    INTMTH303

    Internship - Mathematics

    Internship - Mathematics

    3

    INTMUS301

    Internship - Music

    Internship - Music

    1

    INTMUS302

    Internship - Music

    Internship - Music

    2

    INTMUS303

    Internship - Music

    Internship - Music

    3

    INTPHY301

    Internship - Physics

    Internship - Physics

    1

    INTPHY302

    Internship - Physics

    Internship - Physics

    2

    INTPHY303

    Internship - Physics

    Internship - Physics

    3

    INTPOL301

    Internship - Political Science

    1

    INTPOL302

    Internship - Political Science

    Internship - Political Science

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 2

    INTPOL303

    Internship - Political Science

    Internship - Political Science

    3

    INTPOL304

    Internship - Political Science

    Internship - Political Science

    4

    INTPOL305

    Internship - Political Science

    Internship: Political Science.

    5

    INTPOL306

    Internship - Political Science

    Internship - Political Science

    6

    INTPSY301

    Internship - Psychology

    Internship - Psychology

    1

    INTPSY302

    Internship - Psychology

    Internship - Psychology

    2

    INTPSY303

    Internship - Psychology

    Internship - Psychology

    3

    INTPSY304

    Internship - Psychology

    Internship - Psychology

    4

    INTPSY305

    Internship - Psychology

    Internship - Psychology

    5

    INTPSY306

    Internship - Psychology

    6

    INTPSY309

    Internship - Psychology

    Internship - Psychology

    9

    INTPSY312

    Internship - Psychology

    Internship - Psychology

    12

    INTREL301

    Internship - Religion

    Internship - Religion

    1

    INTREL302

    Internship - Religion

    Internship - Religion

    2

    INTREL303

    Internship - Religion

    Internship - Religion

    3

    INTSSA301

    Internship - Social Services Administration

    Internship - Social Services Administration

    1

    INTSSA302

    Internship - Social Services Administration

    Internship - Social Services Administration

    2

    INTSSA303

    Internship - Social Services Administration

    Internship - Social Services Administration

    3

    INTSSA304

    Internship - Social Services Administration

    Internship - Social Services Administration

    4

    INTSUS301

    Internship - Sustainability

    Internship - Sustainability

    1

    INTSUS302

    Internship - Sustainability

    Internship - Sustainability

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 2

    INTSUS303

    Internship - Sustainability

    Internship - Sustainability

    3

    INTSUS312

    Internship - Sustainability

    Internship - Sustainability

    12

    INTSWK301

    Internship - Social Work

    Internship - Social Work

    1

    INTSWK302

    Internship - Social Work

    Internship - Social Work

    2

    INTSWK303

    Internship - Social Work

    Internship - Social Work

    3

    INTWGS303

    Internship - Women's and Gender Studies

    Internship - Women's and Gender Studies

    3

    INTWST301

    Internship - Women's Studies

    Internship - Women's Studies

    1

    INTWST302

    Internship - Women's Studies

    Internship - Women's Studies

    2

    INTWST303

    Internship - Women's Studies

    Internship - Women's Studies

    3

    IT145SNHU

    Introduction to Software Development

    OCICU course taught at Southern New Hampshire University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    IT201SNHU

    Computer Platform Technologies

    OCICU course taught at Southern New Hampshire University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    IT330SNH

    Database Design and Management

    OCICU course taught at Southern New Hampshire University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    KOR0075PIT

    Introduction to Korea Through Films

    Course taught at the University of Pittsburgh through cross registration.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    LAR534

    Soil Science

    The focus of this course is to introduce students to the concept of soil as a natural resource, the basic physical, chemical and biological properties of soils; the management of soils for growth of terrestrial vegetation; the role of soils in buffering watersheds and aquifers from environmental pollutants; and the role of soils in natural and managed landscape and aquifer water budgets. The role of soils and associated vegetation in global carbon budgets will also be discussed. Emphasis is placed on soil as an influential factor in urbanized and disturbed settings.

    3

    LNG101

    Introduction to Arabic Language and Culture I

    This elementary language acquisition course is intended for students with no previous knowledge of Arabic. It emphasizes the development of listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills and introduces the basic vocabularies and structures of global general education requirement.

    3

    LNG101L

    Introduction to Arabic Language and Culture I - Lab

    A deepened understanding of the cultural values of the target language culture is a critical component of language learning and "world readiness." This course provides a platform oriented toward social and cultural experience, in order to enhance linguistic knowledge gained through in-class language learning. This course compliments LNG 101.

    1

    LNG102

    Introduction to Arabic Language and Culture II

    This course follows LNG101 and builds on the structures and vocabularies already introduced. Its emphasis is on further developing the four language skills: listening, reading, speaking, and writing. It provides cultural context to complement linguistic proficiency. The course counts towards the International Certificate and fulfills a global general education requirement.

    3

    LNG102L

    Introduction to Arabic Language and Culture II-Lab

    A deepened understanding of the cultural values of the target language culture is a critical component of language learning and "world readiness." This course provides a platform oriented toward social and cultural experience, in order to enhance linguistic knowledge gained through in-class language learning. This course complements LNG 102.

    1

    LNG120

    East Asian Scripts: Philosophy, Poetics, Practice

    An outline understanding of the language and writing systems of China, Japan, and Korea is a useful and intriguing step toward deeper work in East Asian studies. This course gives conceptual overview and practical guidance for basic pronunciation, writing, cross-cultural communication, and related arts.

    1

    LNG121

    Introduction to Chinese Language and Culture I

    This elementary language acquisition course is intended for students with no previous knowledge of Chinese. It emphasizes the development of listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills and introduces students to the Hanyu pinyin romanization system and traditional characters. This course counts towards the International Certificate and fulfills a global general education requirement.

    3

    LNG121L

    Introduction to Chinese Language and Culture I-Lab

    A deepened understanding of the cultural values of the target language culture is a critical component of language learning and "world readiness." This course provides a platform oriented toward social and cultural experience, in order to enhance linguistic knowledge gained through in-class language learning. This course complements LNG 121.

    1

    LNG122

    Introduction to Chinese Language and Culture II

    This course follows LNG121 and builds on the structures and vocabularies already introduced. Its emphasis is on further developing the four language skills: listening, reading, speaking, and writing. It provides cultural context to complement linguistic proficiency. The course counts towards the International Certificate and fulfills a global general education requirement.

    3

    LNG122L

    Introduction to Chinese Language and Culture II-Lab

    A deepened understanding of the cultural values of the target language culture is a critical component of language learning and "world readiness." This course provides a platform oriented toward social and cultural experience, in order to enhance linguistic knowledge gained through in-class language learning. This course complements LNG 122.

    1

    LNG131

    Introduction to French Language and Culture I

    This elementary language acquisition course is intended for students with no previous knowledge of French. It emphasizes the development of listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills and introduces the basic vocabularies and structures of the language. This course counts towards the International Certificate and fulfills a global general education requirement.

    3

    LNG131L

    Introduction to French Language and Culture I-Lab

    A deepened understanding of the cultural values of the target language culture is a critical component of language learning and "world readiness." This course provides a platform oriented toward social and cultural experience, in order to enhance linguistic knowledge gained through in-class language learning. This course complements LNG 131.

    1

    LNG132

    Introduction to French Language and Culture II

    This course follows LNG131 and builds on the structures and vocabularies already introduced. Its emphasis is on further developing the four language skills: listening, reading, speaking, and writing. It provides cultural context to complement linguistic proficiency. The course counts towards the International Certificate and fulfills a global general education requirement.

    3

    LNG132L

    Introduction to French Language and Culture II-Lab

    A deepened understanding of the cultural values of the target language culture is a critical component of language learning and "world readiness." This course provides a platform oriented toward social and cultural experience, in order to enhance linguistic knowledge gained through in-class language learning. This course complements LNG 132.

    1

    LNG141

    Introduction to German Language and Culture I

    This elementary language acquisition course is intended for students with no previous knowledge of German. It emphasizes the development of listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills and introduces the basic vocabularies and structures of the language. This course counts towards the International Certificate and fulfills a global general education requirement.

    3

    LNG141L

    Introduction to German Language and Culture I-Lab

    A deepened understanding of the cultural values of the target language culture is a critical component of language learning and "world readiness." This course provides a platform oriented toward social and cultural experience, in order to enhance linguistic knowledge gained through in-class language learning. This course complements LNG 141.

    1

    LNG142

    Introduction to German Language and Culture II

    This course follows LNG141 and builds on the structures and vocabularies already introduced. Its emphasis is on further developing the four language skills: listening, reading, speaking, and writing. It provides cultural context to complement linguistic proficiency. The course counts towards the International Certificate and fulfills a global general education requirement.

    3

    LNG142L

    Introduction to German Language and Culture II - Lab

    A deepened understanding of the cultural values of the target language culture is a critical component of language learning and "world readiness." This course provides a platform oriented toward social and cultural experience, in order to enhance linguistic knowledge gained through in-class language learning. This course complements LNG142.

    Co-requisites

    • LNG142 Introduction to German Language and Culture II
    1

    LNG151

    Introduction to Japanese Language and Culture I

    This elementary language acquisition course is intended for students with no previous knowledge of Japanese. It emphasizes the development of listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills and introduces the basic vocabularies and structures of the language. This course counts towards the International Certificate and fulfills a global general education requirement.

    3

    LNG151L

    Introduction to Japanese Language and Culture I-Lab

    A deepened understanding of the cultural values of the target language culture is a critical component of language learning and "world readiness." This course provides a platform oriented toward social and cultural experience, in order to enhance linguistic knowledge gained through in-class language learning. This course complements LNG 151.

    1

    LNG152

    Introduction to Japanese Language and Culture II

    This course follows LNG151 and builds on the structures and vocabularies already introduced. Its emphasis is on further developing the four language skills: listening, reading, speaking, and writing. It provides cultural context to complement linguistic proficiency. The course counts towards the International Certificate and fulfills a global general education requirement.

    3

    LNG152L

    Introduction to Japanese Language and Culture II-Lab

    A deepened understanding of the cultural values of the target language culture is a critical component of language learning and "world readiness." This course provides a platform oriented toward social and cultural experience, in order to enhance linguistic knowledge gained through in-class language learning. This course complements LNG 152.

    1

    LNG160

    Spanish for Health Care Workers I

    Effective communication with Spanish speaking patients is an important aspect of the health care profession. This 1-credit course is designed to equip students with the basic Spanish language skills needed in interpersonal communication in clinical settings. Emphasis is on specialized vocabulary building and oral proficiency.

    1

    LNG161

    Introduction to Spanish Language and Culture I

    This elementary language acquisition course is intended for students with no previous knowledge of Spanish. It emphasizes the development of listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills and introduces the basic vocabularies and structures of the language. This course counts towards the International Certificate and fulfills a global general education requirement.

    3

    LNG161L

    Introduction to Spanish Language and Culture I-Lab

    A deepened understanding of the cultural values of the target language culture is a critical component of language learning and "world readiness." This course provides a platform oriented toward social and cultural experience, in order to enhance linguistic knowledge gained through in-class language learning. This course complements LNG 161.

    1

    LNG162

    Introduction to Spanish Language and Culture II

    This course follows LNG161 and builds on the structures and vocabularies already introduced. Its emphasis is on further developing the four language skills: listening, reading, speaking, and writing. It provides cultural context to complement linguistic proficiency. The course counts towards the International Certificate and fulfills a global general education requirement.

    3

    LNG162L

    Introduction to Spanish Language and Culture II-Lab

    A deepened understanding of the cultural values of the target language culture is a critical component of language learning and "world readiness." This course provides a platform oriented toward social and cultural experience, in order to enhance linguistic knowledge gained through in-class language learning. This course complements LNG 162.

    1

    LNG201

    Intermediate Arabic Language and Culture I

    This course is designed for students with one year of college-level Arabic and follows LNG102. Emphasis is on deepening linguistic and cultural knowledge to further build language proficiency. This course counts towards the International Certificate and International Studies major. It fulfills a global general education requirement.

    3

    LNG201L

    Intermediate Arabic Language and Culture I-Lab

    A deepened understanding of the cultural values of the target language culture is a critical component of language learning and "world readiness." This course provides a platform oriented toward social and cultural experience, in order to enhance linguistic knowledge gained through in-class language learning. This course complements LNG 201.

    1

    LNG202

    Intermediate Arabic Language and Culture II

    This course expands upon content learned in LNG201. It allows students to strengthen their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills and deepen their understanding of Arabic and the Arabic-speaking world. This course counts towards the International Certificate and International Studies major. It fulfills a global general education requirement.

    3

    LNG202L

    Intermediate Arabic Language and Culture II-Lab

    A deepened understanding of the cultural values of the target language culture is a critical component of language learning and "world readiness." This course provides a platform oriented toward social and cultural experience, in order to enhance linguistic knowledge gained through in-class language learning. This course complements LNG 202.

    1

    LNG221

    Intermediate Chinese Language and Culture I

    This course is designed for students with one year of college-level Chinese and follows LNG122. Emphasis is on deepening linguistic and cultural knowledge to further build language proficiency. This course counts towards the International Certificate and International Studies major. It fulfills a global general education requirement.

    3

    LNG221L

    Intermediate Chinese Language and Culture I-Lab

    A deepened understanding of the cultural values of the target language culture is a critical component of language learning and "world readiness." This course provides a platform oriented toward social and cultural experience, in order to enhance linguistic knowledge gained through in-class language learning. This course complements LNG 221.

    1

    LNG222

    Intermediate Chinese Language and Culture II

    This course expands upon content learned in LNG221. It allows students to strengthen their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills and deepen their understanding of Chinese culture and language. This course counts towards the International Certificate and International Studies major. It fulfills a global general education requirement.

    3

    LNG222L

    Intermediate Chinese Language and Culture II

    A deepened understanding of the cultural values of the target language culture is a critical component of language learning and "world readiness." This course provides a platform oriented toward social and cultural experience, in order to enhance linguistic knowledge gained through in-class language learning. This course complements LNG 222.

    1

    LNG231

    Intermediate French Language and Culture I

    This course is designed for students with one year of college-level French and follows LNG132. Emphasis is on deepening linguistic and cultural knowledge to further build language proficiency. This course counts towards the International Certificate and International Studies major. It fulfills a global general education requirement.

    3

    LNG231L

    Intermediate French Language and Culture I-Lab

    A deepened understanding of the cultural values of the target language culture is a critical component of language learning and "world readiness." This course provides a platform oriented toward social and cultural experience, in order to enhance linguistic knowledge gained through in-class language learning. This course complements LNG 231.

    1

    LNG232

    Intermediate French Language and Culture II

    This course expands upon content learned in LNG231. It allows students to review grammar and transition from basic communication to more in-depth spoken and written discussions of the French-speaking world. This course counts towards the International Certificate and International Studies major. It fulfills a global general education requirement.

    3

    LNG232L

    Intermediate French Language and Culture II-Lab

    A deepened understanding of the cultural values of the target language culture is a critical component of language learning and "world readiness." This course provides a platform oriented toward social and cultural experience, in order to enhance linguistic knowledge gained through in-class language learning. This course complements LNG 232.

    1

    LNG241

    Intermediate German Language and Culture I

    This course is designed for students with one year of college-level German and follows LNG142. Emphasis is on deepening linguistic and cultural knowledge to further build language proficiency. This course counts towards the International Certificate and International Studies major. It fulfills a global general education requirement.

    3

    LNG241L

    Intermediate German Language and Culture I-Lab

    A deepened understanding of the cultural values of the target language culture is a critical component of language learning and "world readiness." This course provides a platform oriented toward social and cultural experience, in order to enhance linguistic knowledge gained through in-class language learning. This course complements LNG 241.

    1

    LNG242

    Intermediate German Language and Culture II

    This course expands upon content learned in LNG241. It allows students to review grammar and transition from basic communication to more in-depth spoken and written discussions of the German-speaking world. This course counts towards the International Certificate and International Studies major. It fulfills a global general education requirement.

    3

    LNG242L

    Intermediate German Language and Culture II-Lab

    A deepened understanding of the cultural values of the target language culture is a critical component of language learning and "world readiness." This course provides a platform oriented toward social and cultural experience, in order to enhance linguistic knowledge gained through in-class language learning. This course complements LNG 242.

    1

    LNG251

    Intermediate Japanese Language and Culture I

    This course is designed for students with one year of college-level Japanese and follows LNG152. Emphasis is on deepening linguistic and cultural knowledge to further build language proficiency. This course counts towards the International Certificate and International Studies major. It fulfills a global general education requirement.

    3

    LNG251L

    Intermediate Japanese Language and Culture I-Lab

    A deepened understanding of the cultural values of the target language culture is a critical component of language learning and "world readiness." This course provides a platform oriented toward social and cultural experience, in order to enhance linguistic knowledge gained through in-class language learning. This course complements LNG 251.

    1

    LNG252

    Intermediate Japanese Language and Culture II

    This course expands upon content learned in LNG251. It gives students the opportunity to strengthen their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills and deepen their understanding of Japanese culture and language. This course counts towards the International Certificate and International Studies major. It fulfills a global general education requirement.

    3

    LNG252L

    Intermediate Japanese Language and Culture II-Lab

    A deepened understanding of the cultural values of the target language culture is a critical component of language learning and "world readiness." This course provides a platform oriented toward social and cultural experience, in order to enhance linguistic knowledge gained through in-class language learning. This course complements LNG 252.

    1

    LNG261

    Intermediate Spanish Language and Culture I

    This course is designed for students with one year of college-level Spanish and follows LNG162. Emphasis is on deepening linguistic and cultural knowledge to further build language proficiency. This course counts towards the International Certificate and International Studies major. It fulfills a global general education requirement.

    3

    LNG261L

    Intermediate Spanish Language and Culture I-Lab

    A deepened understanding of the cultural values of the target language culture is a critical component of language learning and "world readiness." This course provides a platform oriented toward social and cultural experience, in order to enhance linguistic knowledge gained through in-class language learning. This course complements LNG 261.

    1

    LNG262

    Intermediate Spanish Language and Culture II

    This course expands upon content learned in LNG261. It allows students to review grammar and transition from basic communication to more in-depth spoken and written discussions of the Spanish-speaking world. This course counts towards the International Certificate and International Studies major. It fulfills a global general education requirement.

    3

    LNG262L

    Intermediate Spanish Language and Culture II-Lab

    A deepened understanding of the cultural values of the target language culture is a critical component of language learning and "world readiness." This course provides a platform oriented toward social and cultural experience, in order to enhance linguistic knowledge gained through in-class language learning. This course complements LNG 262.

    1

    LNG313

    Special Topics

    This course will cover in-depth, topical analysis of contemporary issues in the discipline not covered in other courses in the program.

    3

    LNG560

    Spanish for Health Care Workers

    Effective communication with Spanish-speaking patients is an important aspect of the health care profession. This 1-credit course is designed to equip students with the basic Spanish language skills needed in interpersonal communication in clinical settings. Emphasis is on specialized vocabulary building and oral proficiency.

    1

    MAT003SLU

    Basic Algebra

    OCICU course taught at Saint Leo University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    MAT151SLU

    College Algebra

    OCICU course taught at Saint Leo University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    MAT201SLU

    Introduction to Statistics

    OCICU course taught at Saint Leo University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    MBA565SLU

    Marketing

    OCICU course taught at Saint Leo University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    MBA610SNH

    Business Law

    OCICU course taught at Southern New Hampshire University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    MGMT2100RMU

    Business Statistics/Quantitative Analysis

    OCICU course taught at Robert Morris University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    MGT331SLU

    Management of Human Resources

    OCICU course taught at Saint Leo University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    MGT6311UIW

    Human Resources Management

    OCICU course taught at University of the Incarnate World.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    MKT310SLU

    Integrated Marketing Communications

    OCICU course taught at Saint Leo University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    MKT3377UIW

    Marketing and Buyer Behavior

    OCICU course taught at University of the Incarnate World.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    MT270RU

    Intro to Statistics

    OCICU course taught at Regis University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    MT415RU

    Linear Algebra

    OCICU course taught at Regis University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    MTH103

    Mathematical Reasoning

    This course is designed for the non-science major, to give a new outlook on mathematics and to provide a sense of the beauty and applicability of mathematics in our world. Topics are primarily related to geometry and include shapes in two and three dimensions, conic sections, topology, fractals and applied geometry.

    3

    MTH104

    Statistics for Everyday Life

    One semester course covering descriptive statistics, statistical measures and distributions, decision making under uncertainty, applications of probability to statistical inference, and linear correlation. Particular emphasis on examples drawn from real world situations. Fulfills Chatham's quantitative reasoning requirement.

    3

    MTH105

    College Algebra

    The study of real numbers, linear equations and inequalities, polynomials, rational expressions, roots and radicals, quadratic equations and inequalities, graphs, systems of linear equations, conics, quadratic functions, and inverse functions. Three hours of class per week.

    3

    MTH108

    Precalculus

    Development of essential skills in algebra and trigonometry. Topics include the coordinate system, functions and their graphs, solutions of equations and inequalities, introduction to transcendental functions, trigonometric functions and their graphs, trigonometric identities, and the historical and cultural significance of mathematics.

    3

    MTH110

    Elementary Statistics

    Topics include statistical measures and distributions, decision making under uncertainty, application of probability to statistical inference, linear correlation, introduction to nonparametric statistical methods, and application to problems drawn from the natural and social sciences. Three hours of class per week. Three hours of class per week.

    3

    MTH151

    Calculus I

    This is the first course in the calculus sequence. Topics include differential and integral calculus for algebraic and trigonometric functions with applications. Four hours of class per week.

    4

    MTH152

    Calculus II

    This is the second course in the calculus sequence. Topics include differential and integral calculus for the transcendental functions, advanced methods of integration, and infinite sequences and series.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • MTH151 Calculus I
  • 4

    MTH215W

    Introduction to Proof

    This course introduces students to the process of reading, understanding and writing rigorous mathematical arguments. Additionally, students will become familiar with computer software used for analyzing math problems and typesetting mathematical documents. This course is a pre-requisite for many upper-level math courses and is intended to help students transition from problem-solving oriented classes such as Calculus into courses focused on understanding and writing proofs. Topics include: basic logic, introductory set theory, functions and relations, and quantifiers.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 2 of the following courses:
  • MTH151 Calculus I
  • MTH152 Calculus II
  • 4

    MTH221

    Linear Algebra

    Topics include finite dimensional vector spaces, geometry of R, linear functions, systems of linear equations, and theory of matrices and determinants.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • MTH151 Calculus I
  • 3

    MTH222

    Multivariate and Vector Calculus

    An introduction to multivariate calculus using vector spaces, partial differentiation and multiple integration, calculus of vector functions, applications to extremum problems, and differential equations. Three hours of class per week.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • MTH152 Calculus II
  • 3

    MTH241

    Differential Equations

    Introduction to differential equations. Topics include first-order and linear equations, systems of equations, series solutions, and Laplace transform methods with computer-aided study of numerical solutions, and introduction to partial differential equations, and Fourier series. Three hours of class per week.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • MTH222 Multivariate and Vector Calculus
  • 3

    MTH244

    Discrete Mathematics

    This course is an introduction to the fundamental logic and mathematical concepts of discrete quantities, as employed in digital computers. Emphasis will be on the careful and precise expression of ideas. Topics include sets and logic, relations and functions, proof techniques, algorithms, combinatorics, discrete probability, graphs, and trees. Three hours of class per week.

    3

    MTH256

    The History and Theory of Numbers

    A survey of the history of our number system and theory of numbers. Topics covered include the development of number systems and mathematics from before the sixth century to the present, divisibility, factorization, arithmetic functions, quadratic reciprocity, primitive roots, and diophantine equations. Three hours of class per week.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 2 of the following courses:
  • MTH105 College Algebra
  • MTH106 Trigonometry
  • OR Complete the following course:
  • MTH108 Precalculus
  • OR Complete the following course:
  • MTH151 Calculus I
  • 3

    MTH310

    Probability

    An introduction to the theory of probability and the role of proofs in mathematics. Topics include discrete and continuous probability functions, random variables, expectations, moments, moment generating functions, the central limit theorem, and Chebyshev's inequality. Applications of probability such as queuing theory, Markov processes, and reliability theory also will be covered. Three hours of class per week.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • MTH152 Calculus II
  • 3

    MTH327

    Advanced Analysis

    Foundations for abstract analysis, real and complex number systems, elements of point set topology and limits, continuity, and derivatives.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • MTH222 Multivariate and Vector Calculus
  • 3

    MTH341

    Abstract Algebra

    Introduction to elements of modern abstract algebra, including rings, groups, and fields.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • MTH221 Linear Algebra
  • 3

    MTH418

    Mathematics Seminar

    A study of some specialized topic in mathematics not ordinarily treated in one of the regular course offerings. Three hours of class per week.

    3

    MTH490

    Integrative Capstone

    The integrative capstone, undertaken by the student during the senior year, is an extended project that helps the student complete their transition from an undergraduate student to a world-ready professional.  The study usually centers on the student’s major and may be conducted, at least in part, in the context of a group experience.  Such programs are crafted to meet the unique needs of each major, and could include, for example, fieldwork, theater production, creative work in the arts, independent research, or independent readings. The integrative capstone in an interdisciplinary major must have the approval of both academic programs.  

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • IND350 Scientific Research Methods
  • 3

    MTH493

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    MTH498

    Tutorial: Mathematics

    4

    MTH499

    Tutorial: Mathematics

    4

    MTH562

    Numerical Methods and Mathematical Modeling

    Numerical methods and mathematical models used in computational science, including techniques for solving scientific problems, scientific visualization, and distributed and massively parallel architecture.

    3

    MUA100

    Piano

    One 30-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    1

    MUA101

    Piano

    One 30-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • MUA100 Piano
  • 1

    MUA102

    Voice

    One 30-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    1

    MUA103

    Voice

    One 30-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • MUA102 Voice
  • 1

    MUA104B

    Piano Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA104C

    Piano Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA105B

    Piano Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA104B Piano Level I
  • MUA104C Piano Level I
  • 2

    MUA105C

    Piano Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA104B Piano Level I
  • MUA104C Piano Level I
  • 3

    MUA106B

    Voice Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA106C

    Voice Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA107B

    Voice Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA106B Voice Level I
  • MUA106C Voice Level I
  • 2

    MUA107C

    Voice Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA106B Voice Level I
  • MUA106C Voice Level I
  • 3

    MUA108B

    Guitar Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA108C

    Guitar Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA109B

    Guitar Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA108B Guitar Level I
  • MUA108C Guitar Level I
  • 2

    MUA109C

    Guitar Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA108B Guitar Level I
  • MUA108C Guitar Level I
  • 3

    MUA110B

    Violin Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA110C

    Violin Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA111B

    Violin Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA110B Violin Level I
  • MUA110C Violin Level I
  • 2

    MUA111C

    Violin Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA110B Violin Level I
  • MUA110C Violin Level I
  • 3

    MUA112B

    Viola Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA112C

    Viola Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA113B

    Viola Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA112B Viola Level I
  • MUA112C Viola Level I
  • 2

    MUA113C

    Viola Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA112B Viola Level I
  • MUA112C Viola Level I
  • 3

    MUA114B

    Cello Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA114C

    Cello Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA115B

    Cello Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA114B Cello Level I
  • MUA114C Cello Level I
  • 2

    MUA115C

    Cello Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA114B Cello Level I
  • MUA114C Cello Level I
  • 3

    MUA116B

    Double Bass Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA116C

    Double Bass Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA117B

    Double Bass Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA116B Double Bass Level I
  • MUA116C Double Bass Level I
  • 2

    MUA117C

    Double Bass Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA116C Double Bass Level I
  • MUA116B Double Bass Level I
  • 3

    MUA118B

    Harp Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA118C

    Harp Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA119B

    Harp Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA118B Harp Level I
  • MUA118C Harp Level I
  • 2

    MUA119C

    Harp Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA118B Harp Level I
  • MUA118C Harp Level I
  • 3

    MUA120B

    Flute Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA120C

    Flute Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA121B

    Flute Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA120B Flute Level I
  • MUA120C Flute Level I
  • 2

    MUA121C

    Flute Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA120B Flute Level I
  • MUA120C Flute Level I
  • 3

    MUA122B

    Oboe Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA122C

    Oboe Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA123B

    Oboe Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA122B Oboe Level I
  • MUA122C Oboe Level I
  • 2

    MUA123C

    Oboe Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA122B Oboe Level I
  • MUA122C Oboe Level I
  • 3

    MUA124B

    Clarinet Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA124C

    Clarinet Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA125B

    Clarinet Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA124B Clarinet Level I
  • MUA124C Clarinet Level I
  • 2

    MUA125C

    Clarinet Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA124B Clarinet Level I
  • MUA124C Clarinet Level I
  • 3

    MUA126B

    Bassoon Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA126C

    Bassoon Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA127B

    Bassoon Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA126B Bassoon Level I
  • MUA126C Bassoon Level I
  • 2

    MUA127C

    Bassoon Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA126B Bassoon Level I
  • MUA126C Bassoon Level I
  • 3

    MUA128B

    Saxophone Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA128C

    Saxophone Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA129B

    Saxophone Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA128B Saxophone Level I
  • MUA128C Saxophone Level I
  • 2

    MUA129C

    Saxophone Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA128B Saxophone Level I
  • MUA128C Saxophone Level I
  • 3

    MUA130B

    Horn Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA130C

    Horn Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA131B

    Horn Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA130B Horn Level I
  • MUA130C Horn Level I
  • 2

    MUA131C

    Horn Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA130B Horn Level I
  • MUA130C Horn Level I
  • 3

    MUA132B

    Trumpet Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA132C

    Trumpet Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA133B

    Trumpet Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA132B Trumpet Level I
  • MUA132C Trumpet Level I
  • 2

    MUA133C

    Trumpet Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA132B Trumpet Level I
  • MUA132C Trumpet Level I
  • 3

    MUA134B

    Trombone Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA134C

    Trombone Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA135B

    Trombone Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA134B Trombone Level I
  • MUA134C Trombone Level I
  • 2

    MUA135C

    Trombone Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA134B Trombone Level I
  • MUA134C Trombone Level I
  • 3

    MUA136B

    Euphonium Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA136C

    Euphonium Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA137B

    Euphonium Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA136B Euphonium Level I
  • MUA136C Euphonium Level I
  • 2

    MUA137C

    Euphonium Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA136B Euphonium Level I
  • MUA136C Euphonium Level I
  • 3

    MUA138B

    Tuba Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA138C

    Tuba Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA139B

    Tuba Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA138B Tuba Level I
  • MUA138C Tuba Level I
  • 2

    MUA139C

    Tuba Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA138B Tuba Level I
  • MUA138C Tuba Level I
  • 3

    MUA140B

    Percussion Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA140C

    Percussion Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA141B

    Percussion Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA140B Percussion Level I
  • MUA140C Percussion Level I
  • 2

    MUA141C

    Percussion Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA140B Percussion Level I
  • MUA140C Percussion Level I
  • 3

    MUA142B

    Drum Set Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA142C

    Drum Set Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA143B

    Drum Set Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA142B Drum Set Level I
  • MUA142C Drum Set Level I
  • 2

    MUA143C

    Drum Set Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA142B Drum Set Level I
  • MUA142C Drum Set Level I
  • 3

    MUA144B

    Electric Bass Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA144C

    Electric Bass Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA145B

    Electric Bass Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA144B Electric Bass Level I
  • MUA144C Electric Bass Level I
  • 2

    MUA145C

    Electric Bass Level I

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA144B Electric Bass Level I
  • MUA144C Electric Bass Level I
  • 3

    MUA146B

    Composition Level I

    Students will work closely with the composition instructor to identify and articulate their personal artistic perspective, and develop sound or multimedia compositions that express this outlook. Students may also work on analytic projects that relate to their artistic projects. Specific goals are determined in collaboration with the instructor.

    2

    MUA146C

    Composition Level I

    Students will work closely with the composition instructor to identify and articulate their personal artistic perspective, and develop sound or multimedia compositions that express this outlook. Students may also work on analytic projects that relate to their artistic projects. Specific goals are determined in collaboration with the instructor.

    3

    MUA147B

    Composition Level I

    Students will work closely with the composition instructor to identify and articulate their personal artistic perspective, and develop sound or multimedia compositions that express this outlook. Students may also work on analytic projects that relate to their artistic projects. Specific goals are determined in collaboration with the instructor.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA146B Composition Level I
  • MUA146C Composition Level I
  • 2

    MUA147C

    Composition Level I

    Students will work closely with the composition instructor to identify and articulate their personal artistic perspective, and develop sound or multimedia compositions that express this outlook. Students may also work on analytic projects that relate to their artistic projects. Specific goals are determined in collaboration with the instructor.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA146B Composition Level I
  • MUA146C Composition Level I
  • 3

    MUA204B

    Piano Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA204C

    Piano Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA205B

    Piano Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA204B Piano Level II
  • MUA204C Piano Level II
  • 2

    MUA205C

    Piano Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA204B Piano Level II
  • MUA204C Piano Level II
  • 3

    MUA206B

    Voice Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA206C

    Voice Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA207B

    Voice Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA206B Voice Level II
  • MUA206C Voice Level II
  • 2

    MUA207C

    Voice Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA206B Voice Level II
  • MUA206C Voice Level II
  • 3

    MUA208B

    Guitar Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA208C

    Guitar Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA209B

    Guitar Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA208B Guitar Level II
  • MUA208C Guitar Level II
  • 2

    MUA209C

    Guitar Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA208B Guitar Level II
  • MUA208C Guitar Level II
  • 3

    MUA210B

    Violin Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee

    2

    MUA210C

    Violin Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA211B

    Violin Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA210B Violin Level II
  • MUA210C Violin Level II
  • 2

    MUA211C

    Violin Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA210B Violin Level II
  • MUA210C Violin Level II
  • 3

    MUA212B

    Viola Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA212C

    Viola Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA213B

    Viola Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA212B Viola Level II
  • MUA212C Viola Level II
  • 2

    MUA213C

    Viola Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA212B Viola Level II
  • MUA212C Viola Level II
  • 3

    MUA214B

    Cello Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA214C

    Cello Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA215B

    Cello Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA214B Cello Level II
  • MUA214C Cello Level II
  • 2

    MUA215C

    Cello Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA214B Cello Level II
  • MUA214C Cello Level II
  • 3

    MUA216B

    Double Bass Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA216C

    Double Bass Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA217B

    Double Bass Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA216B Double Bass Level II
  • MUA216C Double Bass Level II
  • 2

    MUA217C

    Double Bass Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA216B Double Bass Level II
  • MUA216C Double Bass Level II
  • 3

    MUA218B

    Harp Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA218C

    Harp Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA219B

    Harp Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA218B Harp Level II
  • MUA218C Harp Level II
  • 2

    MUA219C

    Harp Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA218B Harp Level II
  • MUA218C Harp Level II
  • 3

    MUA220B

    Flute Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA220C

    Flute Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA221B

    Flute Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA220B Flute Level II
  • MUA220C Flute Level II
  • 2

    MUA221C

    Flute Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA220B Flute Level II
  • MUA220C Flute Level II
  • 2

    MUA222B

    Oboe Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA222C

    Oboe Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA223B

    Oboe Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA222B Oboe Level II
  • MUA222C Oboe Level II
  • 2

    MUA223C

    Oboe Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA222B Oboe Level II
  • MUA222C Oboe Level II
  • 3

    MUA224B

    Clarinet Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA224C

    Clarinet Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA225B

    Clarinet Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA224B Clarinet Level II
  • MUA224C Clarinet Level II
  • 2

    MUA225C

    Clarinet Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA224B Clarinet Level II
  • MUA224C Clarinet Level II
  • 3

    MUA226B

    Bassoon Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA226C

    Bassoon Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA227B

    Bassoon Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA226B Bassoon Level II
  • MUA226C Bassoon Level II
  • 2

    MUA227C

    Bassoon Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA226B Bassoon Level II
  • MUA226C Bassoon Level II
  • 3

    MUA228B

    Saxophone Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA228C

    Saxophone Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA229B

    Saxophone Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA228B Saxophone Level II
  • MUA228C Saxophone Level II
  • 2

    MUA229C

    Saxophone Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA228B Saxophone Level II
  • MUA228C Saxophone Level II
  • 3

    MUA230B

    Horn Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA230C

    Horn Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA231B

    Horn Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA230B Horn Level II
  • MUA230C Horn Level II
  • 2

    MUA231C

    Horn Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA230B Horn Level II
  • MUA230C Horn Level II
  • 3

    MUA232B

    Trumpet Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA232C

    Trumpet Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA233B

    Trumpet Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA232B Trumpet Level II
  • MUA232C Trumpet Level II
  • 2

    MUA233C

    Trumpet Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA232B Trumpet Level II
  • MUA232C Trumpet Level II
  • 3

    MUA234B

    Trombone Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA234C

    Trombone Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA235B

    Trombone Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA234B Trombone Level II
  • MUA234C Trombone Level II
  • 2

    MUA235C

    Trombone Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA234B Trombone Level II
  • MUA234C Trombone Level II
  • 3

    MUA236B

    Euphonium Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA236C

    Euphonium Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA237B

    Euphonium Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA236B Euphonium Level II
  • MUA236C Euphonium Level II
  • 2

    MUA237C

    Euphonium Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA236B Euphonium Level II
  • MUA236C Euphonium Level II
  • 3

    MUA238B

    Tuba Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA238C

    Tuba Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA239B

    Tuba Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA238B Tuba Level II
  • MUA238C Tuba Level II
  • 2

    MUA239C

    Tuba Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA238B Tuba Level II
  • MUA238C Tuba Level II
  • 3

    MUA240B

    Percussion Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA240C

    Percussion Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA241B

    Percussion Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA240B Percussion Level II
  • MUA240C Percussion Level II
  • 2

    MUA241C

    Percussion Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA240B Percussion Level II
  • MUA240C Percussion Level II
  • 3

    MUA242B

    Drum Set Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA242C

    Drum Set Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA243B

    Drum Set Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA242B Drum Set Level II
  • MUA242C Drum Set Level II
  • 2

    MUA243C

    Drum Set Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA242B Drum Set Level II
  • MUA242C Drum Set Level II
  • 3

    MUA244B

    Electric Bass Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA244C

    Electric Bass Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA245B

    Electric Bass Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA244B Electric Bass Level II
  • MUA244C Electric Bass Level II
  • 2

    MUA245C

    Electric Bass Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA244B Electric Bass Level II
  • MUA244C Electric Bass Level II
  • 3

    MUA246B

    Composition Level II

    Students will work closely with the composition instructor to identify and articulate their personal artistic perspective, and develop sound or multimedia compositions that express this outlook. Students may also work on analytic projects that relate to their artistic projects. Specific goals are determined in collaboration with the instructor.

    2

    MUA246C

    Composition Level II

    Students will work closely with the composition instructor to identify and articulate their personal artistic perspective, and develop sound or multimedia compositions that express this outlook. Students may also work on analytic projects that relate to their artistic projects. Specific goals are determined in collaboration with the instructor.

    3

    MUA247B

    Composition Level II

    Students will work closely with the composition instructor to identify and articulate their personal artistic perspective, and develop sound or multimedia compositions that express this outlook. Students may also work on analytic projects that relate to their artistic projects. Specific goals are determined in collaboration with the instructor.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA246B Composition Level II
  • MUA246C Composition Level II
  • 2

    MUA247C

    Composition Level II

    Students will work closely with the composition instructor to identify and articulate their personal artistic perspective, and develop sound or multimedia compositions that express this outlook. Students may also work on analytic projects that relate to their artistic projects. Specific goals are determined in collaboration with the instructor.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA246B Composition Level II
  • MUA246C Composition Level II
  • 3

    MUA304B

    Piano Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA304C

    Piano Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA305B

    Piano Level II

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA304B Piano Level III
  • MUA304C Piano Level III
  • 2

    MUA305C

    Piano Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA304B Piano Level III
  • MUA304C Piano Level III
  • 3

    MUA306B

    Voice Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA306C

    Voice Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA307B

    Voice Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA306B Voice Level III
  • MUA306C Voice Level III
  • 2

    MUA307C

    Voice Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA306C Voice Level III
  • MUA306B Voice Level III
  • 3

    MUA308B

    Guitar Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA308C

    Guitar Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA309B

    Guitar Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA308B Guitar Level III
  • MUA308C Guitar Level III
  • 2

    MUA309C

    Guitar Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA308B Guitar Level III
  • MUA308C Guitar Level III
  • 3

    MUA310B

    Violin Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA310C

    Violin Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA311B

    Violin Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA310B Violin Level III
  • MUA310C Violin Level III
  • 3

    MUA311C

    Violin Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA310B Violin Level III
  • MUA310C Violin Level III
  • 3

    MUA312B

    Viola Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA312C

    Viola Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA313B

    Viola Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA312B Viola Level III
  • MUA312C Viola Level III
  • 2

    MUA313C

    Viola Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA312B Viola Level III
  • MUA312C Viola Level III
  • 3

    MUA314B

    Cello Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA314C

    Cello Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA315B

    Cello Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA314B Cello Level III
  • MUA314C Cello Level III
  • 2

    MUA315C

    Cello Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA314B Cello Level III
  • MUA314C Cello Level III
  • 3

    MUA316B

    Double Bass Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA316C

    Double Bass Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA217B Double Bass Level II
  • MUA217C Double Bass Level II
  • 3

    MUA317B

    Double Bass Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA316B Double Bass Level III
  • MUA316C Double Bass Level III
  • 2

    MUA317C

    Double Bass Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA316C Double Bass Level III
  • MUA316B Double Bass Level III
  • 3

    MUA318B

    Harp Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA318C

    Harp Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA319B

    Harp Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA318B Harp Level III
  • MUA318C Harp Level III
  • 2

    MUA319C

    Harp Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA318B Harp Level III
  • MUA318C Harp Level III
  • 3

    MUA320B

    Flute Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA320C

    Flute Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA321B

    Flute Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA320B Flute Level III
  • MUA320C Flute Level III
  • 2

    MUA321C

    Flute Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA320B Flute Level III
  • MUA320C Flute Level III
  • 3

    MUA322B

    Oboe Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA322C

    Oboe Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA323B

    Oboe Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA322B Oboe Level III
  • MUA322C Oboe Level III
  • 2

    MUA323C

    Oboe Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA322B Oboe Level III
  • MUA322C Oboe Level III
  • 3

    MUA324B

    Clarinet Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA324C

    Clarinet Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA325B

    Clarinet Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA324B Clarinet Level III
  • MUA324C Clarinet Level III
  • 2

    MUA325C

    Clarinet Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA324B Clarinet Level III
  • MUA324C Clarinet Level III
  • 3

    MUA326B

    Bassoon Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA326C

    Bassoon Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA327B

    Bassoon Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA326B Bassoon Level III
  • MUA326C Bassoon Level III
  • 2

    MUA327C

    Bassoon Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA326B Bassoon Level III
  • MUA326C Bassoon Level III
  • 3

    MUA328B

    Saxophone Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA328C

    Saxophone Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA329B

    Saxophone Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA328B Saxophone Level III
  • MUA328C Saxophone Level III
  • 2

    MUA329C

    Saxophone Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA328B Saxophone Level III
  • MUA328C Saxophone Level III
  • 3

    MUA330B

    Horn Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA330C

    Horn Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA331B

    Horn Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA330B Horn Level III
  • MUA330C Horn Level III
  • 2

    MUA331C

    Horn Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA330B Horn Level III
  • MUA330C Horn Level III
  • 3

    MUA332B

    Trumpet Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA332C

    Trumpet Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA333B

    Trumpet Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA332B Trumpet Level III
  • MUA332C Trumpet Level III
  • 2

    MUA333C

    Trumpet Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA332B Trumpet Level III
  • MUA332C Trumpet Level III
  • 3

    MUA334B

    Trombone Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA334C

    Trombone Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA335B

    Trombone Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA334B Trombone Level III
  • MUA334C Trombone Level III
  • 2

    MUA335C

    Trombone Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA334B Trombone Level III
  • MUA334C Trombone Level III
  • 3

    MUA336B

    Euphonium Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA336C

    Euphonium Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA337B

    Euphonium Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA336B Euphonium Level III
  • MUA336C Euphonium Level III
  • 2

    MUA337C

    Euphonium Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA336B Euphonium Level III
  • MUA336C Euphonium Level III
  • 3

    MUA338B

    Tuba Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA338C

    Tuba Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA339B

    Tuba Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA338B Tuba Level III
  • MUA338C Tuba Level III
  • 2

    MUA339C

    Tuba Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA338B Tuba Level III
  • MUA338C Tuba Level III
  • 3

    MUA340B

    Percussion Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA340C

    Percussion Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA341B

    Percussion Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA340B Percussion Level III
  • MUA340C Percussion Level III
  • 2

    MUA341C

    Percussion Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA340B Percussion Level III
  • MUA340C Percussion Level III
  • 3

    MUA342B

    Drum Set Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA342C

    Drum Set Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA343B

    Drum Set Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA342B Drum Set Level III
  • MUA342C Drum Set Level III
  • 2

    MUA343C

    Drum Set Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA342B Drum Set Level III
  • MUA342C Drum Set Level III
  • 3

    MUA344B

    Electric Bass Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA344C

    Electric Bass Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA345B

    Electric Bass Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA344B Electric Bass Level III
  • MUA344C Electric Bass Level III
  • 2

    MUA345C

    Electric Bass Level III

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA344B Electric Bass Level III
  • MUA344C Electric Bass Level III
  • 3

    MUA346B

    Composition Level III

    Students will work closely with the composition instructor to identify and articulate their personal artistic perspective, and develop sound or multimedia compositions that express this outlook. Students may also work on analytic projects that relate to their artistic projects. Specific goals are determined in collaboration with the instructor.

    2

    MUA346C

    Composition Level III

    Students will work closely with the composition instructor to identify and articulate their personal artistic perspective, and develop sound or multimedia compositions that express this outlook. Students may also work on analytic projects that relate to their artistic projects. Specific goals are determined in collaboration with the instructor.

    3

    MUA347B

    Composition Level III

    Students will work closely with the composition instructor to identify and articulate their personal artistic perspective, and develop sound or multimedia compositions that express this outlook. Students may also work on analytic projects that relate to their artistic projects. Specific goals are determined in collaboration with the instructor.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA346B Composition Level III
  • MUA346C Composition Level III
  • 2

    MUA347C

    Composition Level III

    Students will work closely with the composition instructor to identify and articulate their personal artistic perspective, and develop sound or multimedia compositions that express this outlook. Students may also work on analytic projects that relate to their artistic projects. Specific goals are determined in collaboration with the instructor.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA346B Composition Level III
  • MUA346C Composition Level III
  • 3

    MUA404B

    Piano Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA404C

    Piano Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA405B

    Piano Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA404B Piano Level IV
  • MUA404C Piano Level IV
  • 2

    MUA405C

    Piano Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA404B Piano Level IV
  • MUA404C Piano Level IV
  • 3

    MUA406B

    Voice Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA406C

    Voice Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA407B

    Voice Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA406C Voice Level IV
  • MUA406B Voice Level IV
  • 2

    MUA407C

    Voice Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA406B Voice Level IV
  • MUA406C Voice Level IV
  • 3

    MUA408B

    Guitar Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA408C

    Guitar Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA409B

    Guitar Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA408B Guitar Level IV
  • MUA408C Guitar Level IV
  • 2

    MUA409C

    Guitar Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA408B Guitar Level IV
  • MUA408C Guitar Level IV
  • 3

    MUA410B

    Violin Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA410C

    Violin Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA411B

    Violin Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA410B Violin Level IV
  • MUA410C Violin Level IV
  • 2

    MUA411C

    Violin Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA410B Violin Level IV
  • MUA410C Violin Level IV
  • 3

    MUA412B

    Viola Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA412C

    Viola Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA413B

    Viola Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA412B Viola Level IV
  • MUA412C Viola Level IV
  • 2

    MUA413C

    Viola Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA412B Viola Level IV
  • MUA412C Viola Level IV
  • 3

    MUA414B

    Cello Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA414C

    Cello Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA415B

    Cello Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA414B Cello Level IV
  • MUA414C Cello Level IV
  • 2

    MUA415C

    Cello Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA414B Cello Level IV
  • MUA414C Cello Level IV
  • 3

    MUA416B

    Double Bass Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA416C

    Double Bass Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA417B

    Double Bass Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA416B Double Bass Level IV
  • MUA416C Double Bass Level IV
  • 2

    MUA417C

    Double Bass Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA416B Double Bass Level IV
  • MUA416C Double Bass Level IV
  • 3

    MUA418B

    Harp Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA418C

    Harp Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA419B

    Harp Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA418B Harp Level IV
  • MUA418C Harp Level IV
  • 2

    MUA419C

    Harp Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA418B Harp Level IV
  • MUA418C Harp Level IV
  • 3

    MUA420B

    Flute Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA420C

    Flute Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA421B

    Flute Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA420B Flute Level IV
  • MUA420C Flute Level IV
  • 2

    MUA421C

    Flute Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA420B Flute Level IV
  • MUA420C Flute Level IV
  • 3

    MUA422B

    Oboe Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA422C

    Oboe Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA423B

    Oboe Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA422B Oboe Level IV
  • MUA422C Oboe Level IV
  • 2

    MUA423C

    Oboe Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA422B Oboe Level IV
  • MUA422C Oboe Level IV
  • 3

    MUA424B

    Clarinet Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA424C

    Clarinet Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA425B

    Clarinet Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA424B Clarinet Level IV
  • MUA424C Clarinet Level IV
  • 2

    MUA425C

    Clarinet Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA424B Clarinet Level IV
  • MUA424C Clarinet Level IV
  • 3

    MUA426B

    Bassoon Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA426C

    Bassoon Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA427B

    Bassoon Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA426B Bassoon Level IV
  • MUA426C Bassoon Level IV
  • 2

    MUA427C

    Bassoon Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA426B Bassoon Level IV
  • MUA426C Bassoon Level IV
  • 3

    MUA428B

    Saxophone Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA428C

    Saxophone Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA429B

    Saxophone Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA428B Saxophone Level IV
  • MUA428C Saxophone Level IV
  • 2

    MUA429C

    Saxophone Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA428B Saxophone Level IV
  • MUA428C Saxophone Level IV
  • 2

    MUA430B

    Horn Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA430C

    Horn Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA431B

    Horn Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA430B Horn Level IV
  • MUA430C Horn Level IV
  • 2

    MUA431C

    Horn Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA430B Horn Level IV
  • MUA430C Horn Level IV
  • 3

    MUA432B

    Trumpet Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA432C

    Trumpet Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA433B

    Trumpet Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA432B Trumpet Level IV
  • MUA432C Trumpet Level IV
  • 2

    MUA433C

    Trumpet Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA432B Trumpet Level IV
  • MUA432C Trumpet Level IV
  • 3

    MUA434B

    Trombone Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA434C

    Trombone Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA435B

    Trombone Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA434B Trombone Level IV
  • MUA434C Trombone Level IV
  • 2

    MUA435C

    Trombone Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA434B Trombone Level IV
  • MUA434C Trombone Level IV
  • 3

    MUA436B

    Euphonium Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA436C

    Euphonium Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA437B

    Euphonium Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA436B Euphonium Level IV
  • MUA436C Euphonium Level IV
  • 2

    MUA437C

    Euphonium Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA436B Euphonium Level IV
  • MUA436C Euphonium Level IV
  • 3

    MUA438B

    Tuba Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA438C

    Tuba Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA439B

    Tuba Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA438B Tuba Level IV
  • MUA438C Tuba Level IV
  • 2

    MUA439C

    Tuba Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA438B Tuba Level IV
  • MUA438C Tuba Level IV
  • 3

    MUA440B

    Percussion Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA440C

    Percussion Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA441B

    Percussion Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA440B Percussion Level IV
  • MUA440C Percussion Level IV
  • 2

    MUA441C

    Percussion Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA440B Percussion Level IV
  • MUA440C Percussion Level IV
  • 3

    MUA442B

    Drum Set Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA442C

    Drum Set Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA443B

    Drum Set Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA442B Drum Set Level IV
  • MUA442C Drum Set Level IV
  • 2

    MUA443C

    Drum Set Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA442B Drum Set Level IV
  • MUA442C Drum Set Level IV
  • 3

    MUA444B

    Electric Bass Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUA444C

    Electric Bass Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUA445B

    Electric Bass Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA444B Electric Bass Level IV
  • MUA444C Electric Bass Level IV
  • 2

    MUA445C

    Electric Bass Level IV

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA444B Electric Bass Level IV
  • MUA444C Electric Bass Level IV
  • 3

    MUA446B

    Composition Level IV

    Students will work closely with the composition instructor to identify and articulate their personal artistic perspective, and develop sound or multimedia compositions that express this outlook. Students may also work on analytic projects that relate to their artistic projects. Specific goals are determined in collaboration with the instructor.

    2

    MUA446C

    Composition Level IV

    Students will work closely with the composition instructor to identify and articulate their personal artistic perspective, and develop sound or multimedia compositions that express this outlook. Students may also work on analytic projects that relate to their artistic projects. Specific goals are determined in collaboration with the instructor.

    3

    MUA447B

    Composition Level IV

    Students will work closely with the composition instructor to identify and articulate their personal artistic perspective, and develop sound or multimedia compositions that express this outlook. Students may also work on analytic projects that relate to their artistic projects. Specific goals are determined in collaboration with the instructor.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA446B Composition Level IV
  • MUA446C Composition Level IV
  • 2

    MUA447C

    Composition Level IV

    Students will work closely with the composition instructor to identify and articulate their personal artistic perspective, and develop sound or multimedia compositions that express this outlook. Students may also work on analytic projects that relate to their artistic projects. Specific goals are determined in collaboration with the instructor.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUA446B Composition Level IV
  • MUA446C Composition Level IV
  • 3

    MUS150

    History of Rock, Pop and Soul

    This course explores the evolution of American and British popular music from about 1950 to the present day. Musical styles are studied and contextualized with an examination of related cultural, social and political trends. Attention is given to issues and constructions of race and gender as they relate to course material, particularly the changing role and status of women in American and British popular music. This course also introduces fundamental music terminology that is germane to the study of popular music.

    3

    MUS159

    Music Fundamentals

    The course introduces fundamental terminology and theoretical concepts associated with common practice Western art music. Specific topics covered include notation, scales, intervals, triads, rhythm, form and basic aural skills. This course provides the requisite knowledge necessary for MUS161: Music Theory I.

    3

    MUS160

    The Art of Music

    Through guided listening, students examine musical works and gain an understanding of the style of various composers and historical periods. Relevant cultural features are presented, and basic elements of music are introduced to enhance the appreciation of this art form.

    3

    MUS161

    Diatonic Tonal Harmony

    The course covers principles of diatonic harmony and voice-leading, as well as species counterpoint and simple formal structures, with an emphasis on analysis and stylistically appropriate composition. The course includes an ear-training lab that features sight-singing, rhythmic performance, and melodic, harmonic and rhythmic dictation.

    4

    MUS163

    Introduction to Music Business

    The course presents a broad overview of the music industry and covers topics such as recording, distribution, publishing, promotion, and artist management. Students will explore a range of career possibilities and develop strategies for pursuing career paths of interest.

    3

    MUS171

    Choir

    Students prepare and perform a wide variety of choral literature for both women’s and mixed voices. An audition is required as are two, two-hour rehearsals per week. Pass/fail grading only.

    2

    MUS171

    Choir

    Students prepare and perform a variety of choral literature. Rehearsals that are 90-120 minutes in duration are held twice per week. Public performances occur at various points throughout the semester. An audition is required.

    1

    MUS173

    Instrumental Ensemble

    Preparation and performance of chamber music for various ensembles.

    2

    MUS173

    Instrumental Ensemble

    Students prepare and perform a variety of instrumental literature. Large ensemble rehearsals that are 90-120 minutes in duration are held twice per week. Chamber ensemble and pep band schedules may vary, but assume a comparable time commitment. Public performances occur at various points throughout the semester. An audition is required.

    1

    MUS174

    Jazz Survey

    Students explore the origin and development of jazz from its African origins to Dixieland and contemporary styles. They become familiar with jazz musicians and a wide variety of jazz styles through recorded music and, when possible, live performances.

    3

    MUS175

    Voice

    One 30-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    1

    MUS176

    Voice

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUS177

    Voice

    One 60-minute lesson per week plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUS183

    Composition

    Students will work closely with the composition instructor to identify and articulate their personal artistic perspective, and develop sound or multimedia compositions that express this outlook. Students may also work on analytic projects that relate to their artistic projects. Specific goals are determined in collaboration with the instructor.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    MUS191

    Piano

    One 30-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    1

    MUS192

    Piano

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUS193

    Piano

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUS195

    Orchestral Instruments

    One 30-minute lesson per week. Corequisite: A music program course. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    1

    MUS196

    Orchestral Instruments

    One 60-minute lesson per week. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    2

    MUS197

    Orchestral Instruments

    One 60-minute lesson per week, plus performance. Additional Fee(s): Applied music fee.

    3

    MUS200HU

    Music Appreciation: 20th Century American Songbook

    OCICU course taught at Heritage University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    MUS204

    Music and Film

    This course is intended for any level of undergraduate students with basic writing abilities and with no prior experience in music or film studies. This course provides a unique opportunity for students to study the interconnection between music and cinema in the context of ideas and themes that cross the boundaries of nation, language, and discipline.

    3

    MUS210

    Music & the Natural World

    This course will explore the intersection of music and nature in musical thought and practice. Students will explore readings from a variety of historical periods to understand the variety of ways in which the relationship between music and nature has been conceived. Particular emphasis will be placed on Early Modern thought as well as living composers such as David Dunn, Annea Lockwood, John Luther Adams, Alvin Curran, Christopher Shultis, and other sonic ecologists who incorporate sounds from the natural environment into their work. This course fulfills an environmental general education mission course requirement.

    3

    MUS220HU

    Music Appreciation

    OCICU course taught at Heritage University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    MUS252

    Chromatic Tonal Harmony

    The course covers principles of chromatic harmony and voice-leading, as well as advanced formal structures, with an emphasis on analysis and stylistically appropriate composition. The course includes an ear-training lab that features sight-singing, rhythmic performance, and melodic, harmonic and rhythmic dictation.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • MUS161 Diatonic Tonal Harmony
  • 4

    MUS262

    Introduction to Computer Music

    The course is a composition-focused introduction to computer music resources. Basic principles of digital audio and acoustics/psychoacoustics, as well as the history of electroacoustic and computer music, are introduced. A range of software applications are used for recording, editing, sequencing, synthesis, and processing. Discussion of composition strategies and aesthetic issues guide the use of such techniques in creative projects.

    3

    MUS266

    World Music

    The course focuses on the music and related arts of selected major civilizations of the world, including India, China, and Japan as well as areas such as Southeast Asia, South America, and Africa. Emphasis is placed on the factors resulting in art that is sometimes quite different from Western music.

    3

    MUS267

    History of Music I

    These courses examine the growth and development of music as an art, music as a part of the whole of civilization, and representative works of all periods leading to an understanding of music itself.

    3

    MUS267W

    History of Music I

    These courses examine the growth and development of music as an art, music as a part of the whole of civilization, and representative works of all periods leading to an understanding of music itself.

    3

    MUS350

    Legal Issues in Music Performance and Production

    The course focuses on legal issues specific to the performance and production of music. Topics include copyright, publishing, licensing, performance rights, royalties, artist management, and digital distribution.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • MUS163 Introduction to Music Business
  • 3

    MUS351

    Audio Production

    The course focuses on all stages of the audio production process and addresses both technical and logistical issues. Students gain experience in all roles in this process including producer and engineer.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • MUS205 Sound Recording Basics
  • 3

    MUS352

    Advanced Computer Music

    This course focuses on advanced topics in computer music such as digital synthesis and signal processing, as well as more nuanced approaches to editing and sequencing. Focus is placed on critical listening and aesthetic considerations. Students will complete creative projects that are broad in scope both technically and aesthetically.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUS262 Introduction to Computer Music
  • MUS262 Electronic/Computer Music Studio
  • 3

    MUS365

    20th-Century Music Analysis

    The course introduces students to art music of 20th-century through the technical analysis of pitch, rhythmic, formal, and timbral structures. Composers whose work is studied in this course include, but are not limited to, Arnold Schoenberg, Anton Webern, Igor Stravinsky, Pierre Boulez, Charles Ives, John Cage, Morton Feldman, and Iannis Xenakis.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • MUS252 Chromatic Tonal Harmony
  • 3

    MUS368W

    History of Music II

    This course is a continuation of History of Music I, and examines the growth and development of music as an art, music as a part of the whole of civilization, and representative works of all periods leading to an understanding of music itself.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • MUS267 History of Music I
  • MUS267W History of Music I
  • 3

    MUS490

    Integrative Capstone

    The integrative capstone, undertaken by the student during the senior year, is an extended project that helps the student complete their transition from an undergraduate student to a world-ready professional.  The study usually centers on the student’s major and may be conducted, at least in part, in the context of a group experience.  Such programs are crafted to meet the unique needs of each major, and could include, for example, fieldwork, theater production, creative work in the arts, independent research, or independent readings. The integrative capstone in an interdisciplinary major must have the approval of both academic programs.  

    3

    MUS492

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 2

    MUS493

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    MUS498

    Tutorial: Music

    4

    MUS499

    Tutorial: Music

    4

    MUSI1320UIW

    Music Appreciation

    OCICU course taught at University of the Incarnate World.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    MUSI3350UIW

    American Popular Music

    OCICU course taught at University of the Incarnate World.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    N101

    Professional Concepts of Nursing

    This course introduces the student to the role of the professional nurse. The concepts of communication, clinical decision making, professionalism and patient education are explored. In addition, the holistic aspects of patient care such as culture, spirituality, legal and ethical issues will be discussed. Tanner's clinical judgment model will provide the framework for the student's development of clinical judgment and decision making.

    3

    N102

    Foundational Concepts of Nursing

    This course introduces the student to the foundational concepts of nursing practice across the lifespan. Basic care and comfort is explored through the concepts of nutrition, elimination, safety, mobility and sensory perception. Physical assessment is a major component of this course. The promotion of health and wellness is an underlying theme carried throughout the course. The student is introduced to basic foundational skills of nursing practice, including medication administration, through both the clinical and lab settings. Students engage in clinical experiences in inpatient medical-surgical units.

    9

    N201

    Physiological Concepts of Nursing

    This course introduces the student to the physiological concepts of nursing practice across the lifespan. The fundamental aspects of oxygenation, perfusion, acid-based balance, fluid and electrolytes infection, immunity, inflammation, digestion and metabolism are explored. Through the integration of the nursing concepts, along with Tanner's clinical judgment model, the student begins to respond to identified patient problems in the clinical setting. Students engage in clinical experiences in acute medical-surgical units.

    10

    N301

    Complex Individual and Family Nursing Concepts

    This course introduces the student to complex individual and family concepts of nursing practice. The course explores dynamic concepts across the lifespan. Family dynamics, reproduction and growth and development alterations are a major focus of the course. Concepts of mental health nursing are explored as they relate to the individual and the overall impact on the family. Through the integration of nursing concepts, along with Tanner's clinical judgment model, the student focuses on assisting the individual and family to adjust to health alterations across the lifespan. Students engage in various clinical experiences in the areas of pediatric, obstetric, geriatric and behavioral health.

    11

    N320

    Advanced Nursing Concepts

    This course introduces the student to advanced concepts of nursing practice. The course builds and expands on the concepts of oxygenation, perfusion, metabolism and infection that were previously introduced in Nursing 211. In addition, the advanced concepts of cellular regulation, intracranial regulation and alterations in tissue integrity are explored. Through the integration of nursing concepts, along with Tanner's clinical judgment model, the student engages in advanced clinical decision making in high acuity environments. Students engage in various clinical experiences that take place in stepdown units, critical care units and emergency departments.

    8

    N340

    Transition Into Nursing Practice

    This course serves as the student's transition into the role of professional nursing practice. Leadership and management concepts are applied with an emphasis on safety and quality nursing care. Clinical is conducted through a preceptor experience where the student is given the opportunity to manage, delegate and prioritize care for multiple patients.

    6

    N360

    NLCEX Prep Course

    This course provides the students with NCLEX preparation through content reviews and test taking strategies.

    2

    NUR111

    Professional Nursing and Health Concepts

    The student will be introduced to the role of the professional nurse based on the Nursing Standards for Professional Practice (Professionalism concept) and explore Tanner’s Clinical Judgment model (Clinical Judgment concept) to develop a systematic approach to clinical decision making. The concept of communication will be explored utilizing self-discovery techniques creating a foundation upon which professional, therapeutic, and structured communication skills will be developed. The concept of informatics will be introduced identifying technologies to support the safe communication of health information. Navigation of the clinical information system will be experienced in the clinical setting. Course taught through UPMC: Shadyside School of Nursing.

    4

    NUR112

    Basic Health Concepts

    The course examines foundational, patient-centered concepts for nursing practice including the concepts of functional ability and optimal human function, mobility, and sensory perception. The patient centered concepts of motivation and adherence are examined as a foundation for teaching the student how to effectively educate patients for optimal self-management and function. Course taught through UPMC: Shadyside School of Nursing.

    5

    NUR113

    Health Assessment and Nursing Practice Strategies

    This one credit laboratory experience is designed to complement the content in NUR112. The focus of this course is the development of the knowledge and skills needed to perform a complete physical assessment utilizing a systematic approach of data collection. This laboratory experience will permit the student to engage in developing cognitive and psychomotor skills to support nursing care related to functional ability, mobility, and patient education. Course taught through UPMC: Shadyside School of Nursing.

    1

    NUR190

    Critical Thinking for Nurses

    This one-credit course is designed to help nursing students enhance their study skills and test taking abilities. Through practice using NCLEX-RN style questions, students will gain a greater understanding of the materials learned in their nursing classes, comfort with testing, and preparation to sit for the licensure exam.

    1

    NUR211

    Health Promotion Concepts

    The focus of this course is health promotion, disease prevention and healthy lifestyles. Students will begin to recognize how the environment influences health and to discriminate between healthy and unhealthy lifestyle choices. The interaction of the individual and the environment inclusive of cultural and spiritual variations as they affect health and wellness will be explored. The attributes and roles of the professional nurse are expanded and applied to diverse experiences. Concepts of health promotion, nutrition, glucose regulation and stress-coping will be emphasized. The clinical experience will focus on the role of the nurse in primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention. Course taught through UPMC: Shadyside School of Nursing.

    4

    NUR212

    Family Health Concepts

    The focus of this course are the development tasks and adaptation as they relate to lifespan and health with the incorporation of selected health issues, physical and developmental changes in the life cycle, health maintenance, and health problems. The concept of caregiving as it relates to family and health care will be introduced. The clinical experience will explore family health care within the community and health care settings. Course taught through UPMC: Shadyside School of Nursing.

    4

    NUR215

    Pharmacology in Nursing I

    This course provides students with a foundation of basic pharmacologic concepts important for safe medication management. Through the exploration of medication classifications, students identify the implications to nursing practice. Building on the concepts presented in prerequisite nursing courses, the students explore medication management across the lifespan. Utilizing the nursing standards for professional practice, students will demonstrate skillfulness in safe medication management. Clinical laboratory will enable students to apply these essential aspects culminating in a medication math calculation competency exam. Course taught through UPMC: Shadyside School of Nursing.

    2

    NUR220

    Exploring the Nursing Profession

    This course will explore the nursing profession and nursing professionalism. Students will learn about different nursing roles and responsibilities, as well as education levels, licensure, and certification. These and other topics will help students gain a greater understanding of the nursing profession.

    1

    NUR300A

    Maternal Child Nursing

    This course encompasses nursing care and the promotion of growth and development of children and families. Emphasis is placed on the health promotional aspects of nursing care. Focus is on the needs of the young families in various life stages: perinatal through adolescence. The impact of acute and chronic diseases is explored from a holistic perspective utilizing a family centered approach. Students provide collaborative nursing care in both community and acute care settings. Additionally students will explore culturally appropriate nursing strategies to influence health. (4 credits theory/3 credits clinical)

    8

    NUR300B

    Nursing in Acute and Chronic Psychiatric Illness

    Shadyside School of Nursing Course

    8

    NUR311

    Health and Illness Concepts

    This course focuses on the health and illness continuum as it applies to human experience across the lifespan. Promotion of health, prevention of disease and the role of the nurse caring for individuals experiencing illness are examined. Concepts for nursing practice from the themes of homeostasis and regulation, protection and movement, and care coordination are explored. Course taught through UPMC: Shadyside School of Nursing.

    6

    NUR312

    Mental Health Concepts

    Incorporating prior knowledge of concepts of health, illness, stress, coping, and communication, this course focuses on the nursing care of individuals across the lifespan with acute and chronic alterations of emotions, cognitions, behaviors, and coping. The student will identify the impact these alterations have on the patient’s ability to actively participate and collaborate with staff in meeting care needs in all healthcare settings. Communication strategies are emphasized as pathways to safe, effective care and interdisciplinary collaboration. Course taught through UPMC: Shadyside School of Nursing.

    5

    NUR315

    Pharmacology in Nursing II

    This course provides students with advanced pharmacologic concepts important for safe medication management. Through the exploration of medication classifications that are utilized in the treatment of more complex concepts, students identify the implications to nursing practice. Building on the concepts presented in pre-requisite nursing courses, the students explore medication management of acute and complex concepts. Utilizing the nursing standards for professional practice, students will demonstrate skillfulness in safe medication management. Clinical laboratory will enable students to apply these essential aspects. Course taught through UPMC: Shadyside School of Nursing.

    2

    NUR380

    Complex Health Concepts

    Using prior knowledge of concepts of health and illness, this course focuses on the nursing care of patients with acute illness and subsequent complex health alterations. The themes of homeostasis and regulation, oxygenation and perfusion and health care delivery are examined through concept analysis of acid-base balance, gas exchange, perfusion, intracranial regulation, clotting and palliation as applied to complex health issues. Family dynamics as it relates to acute illness are explored. The role of the professional nurse is further developed with an emphasis on interdisciplinary collaboration and communication. Clinical experiences will include higher acuity acute care environments and long term acute care Course taught through UPMC: Shadyside School of Nursing.

    7

    NUR382

    Professional Nursing and Health System Concepts

    This course is designed to facilitate the student’s development and transition into the professional nursing role. Through guided experiences with registered nurse preceptors in the acute care setting, students are expected to integrate previous evidenced based learning. They will gradually increase accountability for the patient centered care of patients and their families experiencing functional and dysfunctional health patterns. The primary theme addressed in this course is care competencies for professional nurses that are examined through analysis of the concepts of health care quality and leadership. Course taught through UPMC: Shadyside School of Nursing.

    5

    NUR399

    NCLEX Preparation

    This course prepares the student to take the NCLEX-RN exam through a variety of individual and group strategies. Students will utilize test taking strategies to respond to high level NCLEX style questions and integrate knowledge from previous courses to meet the requirements of benchmarking for licensure as an entry level nurse. Course taught through UPMC: Shadyside School of Nursing.

    2

    NUR400A

    Professional Role Formation and Transition

    This final course in the program facilitates a transition into the professional nursing role. Through precepted clinical experiences, students are paired with RN preceptors gradually increasing responsibility and accountability for nursing care for groups of patients. Additionally, nursing conceptual frameworks supportive of new graduates’ transition to the workforce will be examined. Theory related to patient care management, nursing leadership principles and care delivery to groups of patients will be presented. Collaboration and professional communication will be emphasized. (2 credits theory/4.5 credits hours clinical)

    7

    NUR400B

    Professional Role Formation and Transition

    Shadyside School of Nursing Course

    2

    NUR402

    Health Policy and Finance

    This course is designed to explore the role of Health and Public Policy, financial considerations, formulation and role of legislation and regulation, and ethical principles related to ANA Code of Ethics. Also addressed are topics including value-based purchasing, end-of-life care, living wills, advanced directives, social networking and Affordable Care Act.

    3

    NUR402

    Health Policy and Finance for Nurses

    This course is designed to explore the role of Health and Public Policy, financial considerations, formulation and role of legislation and regulation, and ethical principles related to ANA Code of Ethics. Also addressed are topics including value-based purchasing, end-of-life care, living wills, advanced directives, social networking and Affordable Care Act.

    3

    NUR403

    Women's Health Nursing

    This course will present an overview of issues relevant to women’s health nursing. Nursing assessment techniques specific to female clients will be explored. Specific nursing interventions to promote women’s health will be covered including: HIV, early detection of female cancers, reproductive health, mental health issues, osteoporosis, pharmacokinetics, nutrition, physical fitness.

    3

    NUR403W

    Women's Health Nursing

    This course will present an overview of issues relevant to women’s health nursing. Nursing assessment techniques specific to female clients will be explored. Specific nursing interventions to promote women’s health will be covered including: HIV, early detection of female cancers, reproductive health, mental health issues, osteoporosis, pharmacokinetics, nutrition, physical fitness.

    3

    NUR404

    Community, Environmental Health Nursing

    This course provides a framework for the development of nursing interventions promoting environmental health for individuals and communities. Students are placed in public health agencies for clinical practicum. Tools to assess the environmental health of a select community will be evaluated. Students will explore a particular nursing issue in greater depth as it relates to their clinical placements (air pollution, childhood cancers, toxic waste, noise exposure, etc).

    3

    NUR405

    Cross-Cultural Nursing

    This course provides a theoretical framework for the delivery of culturally competent nursing care. Concepts of illness, health, and wellness will be explored from a cultural belief system perspective. Recognizing cultural diversity, integrating knowledge of culture, and delivery of nursing care in a culturally appropriate/culturally sensitive manner will be studied.

    3

    NUR406

    Issues in Geriatric Health Nursing

    This course will provide an overview of issues relevant to geriatric health nursing. Nursing assessment techniques specific to older adults will be explored. Specific nursing interventions to promote older adult health will be covered including pharmacological considerations, nutrition, elder abuse, sexuality, coping with loss and grief, health and wellness promotion, and continuum of care.

    3

    NUR407

    Scholarship for Evidence-Based Practice

    This course will enable students to critically review nursing research, choose a relevant clinical issue to examine, explore literature, and utilize nursing research in clinical practice. Ethical principles of nursing research, particularly protection of human subjects and other ethical accountabilities focusing on research utilization and evidence-based practice will be explored. 

    3

    NUR408

    Nursing in Underserved Populations

    This course provides a framework for the development of nursing interventions promoting health for underserved populations with a focus on minority health promotion. Students are placed in select primary settings devoted to the care of underserved/minority populations. Students will explore a particular nursing issue in depth as it relates to their clinical placements (access to health care, infant mortality, resources, cultural/communication barriers, issues related to aging).

    3

    NUR409

    Clinical Prevention, Population and Environmental Health

    This course provides a framework for the development of nursing interventions promoting population and environmental health for individuals and communities. Health promotion will be a significant focus of this course.

    3

    NUR410

    Global Cultural Diversity and Specialty Population Nursing

    This course is focused on various cultural and specialty populations. Multiple aspects of culture, vulnerability, and needs of individual populations will be analyzed and discussed. Content includes issues of ethics, social justice, health literacy, and barriers to care.

    3

    NUR411

    Geriatric Nursing

    Multiple aspects of geriatric health and the aging population will be explored. Specific nursing interventions to promote older adult health will be covered including pharmacological considerations, nutrition, elder abuse, sexuality, coping with loss and grief, health and wellness promotion and the continuum of care.

    3

    NUR412

    Nursing Communication and Quality Improvement

    This course will prepare the student for effective communication and collaboration amongst the interprofessional team with the goal of practicing high quality, safe, patient-centered care. Topics of quality improvement and interprofessional communication will be emphasized.

    3

    NUR499

    Nursing Leadership and Professionalism Practicum

    This culminating course encompasses various aspects of professionalism and leadership while shadowing multiple leaders in the clinical setting. Students will apply leadership concepts and decision making skills in the provision of high quality nursing care. (70 clinical hours required)

    4

    NUR499W

    Nursing Leadership and Professionalism Practicum

    This culminating course encompasses various aspects of professionalism and leadership while shadowing multiple leaders in the clinical setting. Students will apply leadership concepts and decision making skills in the provision of high quality nursing care. (70 clinical hours required)

    4

    NUR499W

    Nursing Leadership and Professional Practicum

    This culminating course, which fulfills Chatham's internship requirement, encompasses various aspects of professionalism and leadership that students will encounter and utilize at all levels of nursing. Students will apply leadership concepts and decision-making skills while they complete their capstone project.

    4

    NUR501

    Scientific Underpinnings for Practice

    This course examines principles and processes of evidence based practice as a strategy to guide clinical decision making, initiate practice change and improve nursing practice, including translating, evaluating and disseminating the evidence. Course elements include gaining knowledge of research design, statistical concepts and search strategies.

    3

    NUR502

    Applied Pathophysiology and Pharmacology for Professional Practice

    This course focuses on normal, acute, and chronic human physiological processes across the lifespan. Attention will be given to genetic/genomic content that may alter or result in an acute or chronic disease. Information gained in this course may assist the student in performing a physical health assessment based on the symptomatology of various acute and chronic illnesses.

    3

    NUR503

    Informatics Foundation and Health Care Technology

    This course will assist students within the graduate program to develop a strong foundation of knowledge in understanding the impact technology and informatics has in the delivery of care across various settings. Students will be introduced to current and emerging technologies while exploring the impact on patient outcomes and staff satisfaction.

    3

    NUR504

    Organizational, Quality & Systems Leadership

    The course content includes theories, research, and applications that focus on managing organizational behavior, quality improvement, and systems leadership within and across all aspects and of integrated health care delivery system. This course provides an overview of these topics with an emphasis on leadership decisions making.

    3

    NUR504

    Introduction to Organizational Leadership in Nursing

    Emphasizing leadership decision making, this course includes an overview of theories, research, and applications that focus on managing organizational behavior, quality improvement, and systems leadership across health care delivery systems. Students will learn how patient care systems are structured, processes developed, and outcomes affected by actions of leaders and employees.

    3

    NUR505

    Applied Physical Assessment and Health Promotion for Professional Practice

    This course focuses on health assessment of the adult, child, and infant. Concentration is focused on physical assessment techniques and taking a thorough health history in order to improve and ensure quality patient care. Genetic/genomic content will be reviewed accordingly with each physical system assessed as well as use of a pedigree for the family history portion of a health history.

    3

    NUR505

    Health Assessment and Promotion Across the Lifespan

    This course provides an exploration of key concepts in pathophysiology, physical assessment, and pharmacotherapy across the lifespan for the masters prepared nurse. The role of gender, genetics, and cultural influences in the context of health assessment and promotion will also be analyzed.

    3

    NUR506

    Professional Role: Communication & Collaboration for Improving Pt. Outcome

    This course will assist nurses to develop, analyze and apply skills in collaboration and communication, including the Interprofessional Education Collaborative's core competencies, effective communication strategies based on complexity and transformational leadership theory, skills of presentation and publication to improve patient care and advance nursing practice.

    3

    NUR507

    Health Policy & Advocacy

    In this course students analyze and synthesize innovative approaches to complex issues in health care delivery at the local, state, and federal levels. Concepts such as politics, policy, market forces, and advocacy are used to assess how system approaches can affect health care delivery.

    3

    NUR630

    Health Care Economics and Financial Management

    The Health Care Economics and Financial Management course focuses on examination and understanding of health care financing and reimbursement concepts preparing a world ready nurse leader to function in a variety of health care delivery settings. Content focuses on concepts of budget and leadership management, influencing policy makers, and linking patient care outcomes to resource management.

    3

    NUR631

    Integrating Technology into a Health Care Environment

    This course will assist healthcare professionals within a graduate program to develop a strong foundation of knowledge in understanding the impact technology and informatics has in the delivery of care across various health settings. Students will be introduced to current and emerging technologies while exploring the impact on patient outcomes and staff satisfaction.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • NUR503 Informatics Foundation and Health Care Technology
  • 3

    NUR632

    Curriculum Design and Evaluation in Nursing Education

    This course focuses on the processes of curriculum development and evaluation that are critical responsibilities of nurse educators in schools of nursing, patient education programs, or staff development. Course goals include how the curriculum provides guidelines for program delivery and methods for evaluating program effectiveness.

    3

    NUR640

    Leadership for Change

    This course focuses on the needs of health care leaders to take health care delivery into the future through creative, innovative design initiatives focusing on a consumer driven health care delivery system. Content includes: variables impacting health care delivery systems, reimbursement and funding for design change, managing competition, and managing human and financial resources.

    3

    NUR642

    Professional Role and Responsibility of the Nurse Educator

    The professional role and responsibility of the nurse educator course focuses on diverse roles and practice environments experienced by nurse educators. The course will provide novice and experienced nurse educators with guidelines for practice in classroom, clinical, staff development, and various educational settings. Academic and institutional policies, protocols and legal aspects will be explored.

    3

    NUR650

    Leadership and Health Care Operations

    This course provides an overview of three distinct and necessary areas of leadership knowledge with an emphasis on managerial decision-making including legal aspects of health care, human resource management, and health policy. Students will work through specific scenarios in each of these areas to identify legal, ethical, and political issues.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 3 of the following courses:
  • NUR504 Organizational, Quality & Systems Leadership
  • NUR630 Health Care Economics and Financial Management
  • NUR640 Leadership for Change
  • 3

    NUR651

    Database Management for Evidence-based Decision making

    This course is designed to assist the student in understanding the various database systems used within a healthcare setting. Key to this course is understanding how healthcare professionals can collect and extract data from database systems to assess the organizations performance and impact on patient outcomes.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 2 of the following courses:
  • NUR503 Informatics Foundation and Health Care Technology
  • NUR631 Integrating Technology into a Health Care Environment
  • 3

    NUR652

    Teaching Strategies and Information Technology for the Nurse Educator

    This course will focus on strategies to develop knowledge and skill sets in pedagogy, teaching-learning theories, testing and measurement, and various educational technologies. An in-depth introduction to information technology that supports practice and improves patient care and outcomes will be explored.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • NUR632 Curriculum Design and Evaluation in Nursing Education
  • 3

    NUR660C

    Health Care Leadership Practicum

    The Leadership Seminar focuses on relevant and timely health care leadership issues confronting today's health care leaders. Topics will include how to become a better leader, getting support in a leadership role, mentoring others, being a role model, identifying resources for success in a leadership role.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 2 of the following courses:
  • NUR630 Health Care Economics and Financial Management
  • NUR640 Leadership for Change
  • 3

    NUR660D

    Health Care Leadership Practicum

    The Leadership Seminar focuses on relevant and timely health care leadership issues confronting today's health care leaders. Topics will include how to become a better leader, getting support in a leadership role, mentoring others, being a role model, identifying resources for success in a leadership role.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 2 of the following courses:
  • NUR630 Health Care Economics and Financial Management
  • NUR640 Leadership for Change
  • 4

    NUR661

    Health Care Informatics Practicum

    The practicum focuses on the role of the healthcare informatics professional within a healthcare environment. Students will work closely with healthcare professionals who are directly involved in improving quality of care, organizational processes, or safety, engaging in a learning experience that further integrates program content. Practicum includes a formal preceptorship.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 3 of the following courses:
  • NUR503 Informatics Foundation and Health Care Technology
  • NUR631 Integrating Technology into a Health Care Environment
  • NUR651 Database Management for Evidence-based Decision making
  • 3

    NUR662

    Healthcare Education Practicum

    The practicum focuses on the role of the professional nurse in the healthcare environment. Students will work closely with healthcare professionals who are directly or indirectly involved in improving care quality, organizational processes, or safety engaging in a learning experience that further integrates program content. Practicum experience includes a formal preceptorship.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • NUR632 Curriculum Design and Evaluation in Nursing Education
  • 3

    NUR670C

    Healthcare Leadership Capstone

    This capstone course focuses on the expanded role of the professional nurse in the healthcare environment. The student will facilitate the implementation of their capstone plan developed in the practicum course. The student will work in a collaborative relationship with their preceptor and other identified healthcare professionals who are directly or indirectly involved with the project.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 2 of the following courses:
  • NUR504 Organizational, Quality & Systems Leadership
  • NUR630 Health Care Economics and Financial Management
  • NUR640 Leadership for Change
  • 3

    NUR670D

    Healthcare Leadership Capstone

    This capstone course focuses on the expanded role of the professional nurse in the healthcare environment. The student will facilitate the implementation of their capstone plan developed in the practicum course. The student will work in a collaborative relationship with their preceptor and other identified healthcare professionals who are directly or indirectly involved with the project.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete any 1 of the following courses:
  • NUR504 Organizational, Quality & Systems Leadership
  • NUR504 Introduction to Organizational Leadership in Nursing
  • Complete all 2 of the following courses:
  • NUR640 Leadership for Change
  • NUR630 Health Care Economics and Financial Management
  • 4

    NUR671

    Healthcare Informatics Capstone

    This capstone course focuses on the expanded role of the healthcare informatics professional in the healthcare environment. The student will facilitate the implementation of their capstone project developed in the practicum course. The student will work in a collaborative relationship with a preceptor and other identified healthcare professionals who are involved in their project.

    3

    NUR672

    Healthcare Education Capstone

    This capstone focuses on the expanded role of the professional nurse in the healthcare environment. The student will facilitate the implementation of their capstone project developed in the practicum course. The student will work in a collaborative relationship with their preceptor and other identified healthcare professionals who are involved in their project.

    3

    NUR693A

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 1

    NUR693B

    Independent Study:

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 2

    NUR693C

    Independent Study:

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    NUR697

    Nursing Practice Experience

    This course provides an opportunity to gain practice experience related to an area of interest. The student will select a practice area and work under the guidance of a preceptor. This course is for those planning admission to Chatham University’s Doctor of Nursing Practice program and lack the required practice experience hours.

    3

    NUR697A

    Nursing Practice Experience

    This course provides an opportunity for students to gain practice experience (PE) related to an area of interest. The student will select a practice area and work under the guidance of a preceptor. This course is designed for those planning admission to Chatham University's DNP program and lack the required practice experience hours.

    1

    NUR697B

    Nursing Practice Experience

    This course provides an opportunity for students to gain practice experience (PE) related to an area of interest. The student will select a practice area and work under the guidance of a preceptor. This course is designed for those planning admission to Chatham University's DNP program and lack the required practice experience hours.

    2

    NUR697C

    Nursing Practice Experience

    This course provides an opportunity for students to gain practice experience (PE) related to an area of interest. The student will select a practice area and work under the guidance of a preceptor. This course is designed for those planning admission to Chatham University's DNP program and lack the required practice experience hours.

    3

    NUR700

    Structure & App of Contemporary Nursing Knowledge

    This course introduces the advanced practice nurse to the world of contemporary nursing knowledge, as formalized in conceptual models of nursing and nursing theories applied to clinical practice. There is emphasis on the metaparadigm, philosophies, conceptual models, theories, and empirical indicators linking them to clinical practice.

    3

    NUR702

    Developing Evidence-Based Practice

    This course prepares students with skills and competencies needed to build and assimilate knowledge for establishing a scholarly trajectory at a high level of complexity. This clinical course consists of 125 clinical hours and is the foundation for the culminating Capstone project focusing on improving practice.

    3

    NUR703

    Ethics and Public Policy in Healthcare Delivery

    This course focuses on ethical issues and public policy in healthcare. Students develop strategies to manage ethical dilemmas and analyze health policy to educate, advocate and provide leadership in shaping healthcare policy.

    3

    NUR704

    Quality Improvement in Health Care

    This course focuses on quality improvement initiatives, including the protection of human subjects. The emphasis is on skills and competencies needed to provide leadership in quality and systems change. This course includes 125 clinical hours and is the foundation for the culminating Capstone project focusing on improved practice and outcomes.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 2 of the following courses:
  • NUR700 Structure & App of Contemporary Nursing Knowledge
  • NUR702 Developing Evidence-Based Practice
  • 3

    NUR705

    Advancing Practice: Scholarship and Grant Writing

    This course provides further investigation of evidence-based practice advancing nursing leadership and clinical outcomes. Students will develop skills for clinical scholarship including manuscript development and grant writing.

    3

    NUR706

    Communication and Collaboration for Health Care Leadership

    This course focuses on strategies to improve professional communication with peers, subordinates, and patients in the health care environment.

    3

    NUR707

    Information Technology and Data-Driven Decision Making

    This course provides students with an opportunity to examine the value of technology and information systems to support evidence-based practice, guidelines and policy across various health settings. Various methods for gathering, managing, and synthesizing data will be introduced in order to conduct analyses for quality improvement, financial and outcome evaluations.

    3

    NUR799

    Capstone Experience

    This course provides an opportunity for the student to implement and evaluate a planned evidence-based practice change project. This project lays the groundwork for future scholarship. This course culminates in a tangible and deliverable academic product derived from the practice immersion experience. A total of 250 clinical hours are included in the course.

    6

    NUTR2310UIW

    Introduction to Nutrition Science

    OCICU course taught at University of the Incarnate World.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    OL211SNH

    Human Resource Management

    OCICU course taught at Southern New Hampshire University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    OL320SNHU

    Entrepreneurship

    OCICU course taught at Southern New Hampshire University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    OL630SNHU

    Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management

    OCICU course taught at Southern New Hampshire University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    ORGL1200RMU

    Diversity and Multiculturalism in Organizations

    OCICU course taught at Robert Morris University.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 3

    OTD733

    Global Health Perspectives: A Field Experience

    This course is intended to provide an opportunity for occupational therapy doctoral students to study and experience global health issues by participating in an international fieldwork experience. Not everything that is germane to understanding global health can be covered in a single elective course; this experience is intended to give students the opportunity to 1) understand the culture and contemporary health care issues of the visiting country 2) illustrate the role or potential role of occupational therapy in contributing to the health and wellbeing of the population and 3) reflect on their personal growth and on the sustainability of their service.

    2

    OTD740

    Occupational Science

    Professional students examine landmark occupational science literature and apply learned concepts of human nature and meaningful occupation to observation exercises within their practice focus.

    3

    OTD741

    Evidence-Based Practice

    This course is designed to provide the experienced therapist with a systematic method to critically evaluate and integrate the results of current scientific literature into the clinical decision making process. Students will participate in discussions and practical exercises to articulate clinical questions that can be answered through sources of scientific evidence. Strategies for searching relevant data bases, appraising and evaluating sources of evidence will be presented.

    3

    OTD742

    Advanced Practice Concepts and Skills

    Students apply The Occupational Therapy Practice Framework: Domain and Process (AJOT, 2014) and conceptual models most relevant for their practice focus to evaluation and intervention processes. Additionally, students redesign facility forms to reflect The OT Practice Framework's language and concepts.

    3

    OTD750

    Occupational Therapist as Entrepreneur

    This course provides the professional student with the knowledge and skills necessary to market and manage an occupational therapy practice in either traditional or emerging healthcare systems. Students develop business plans and marketing strategies and research potential financing through grants or loans. Legal and ethical issues impacting practice are also examined.

    3

    OTD751

    Capstone Project Design

    Students continue to develop their ability to critically evaluate scientific evidence within their practice focus. Through a critical review of the literature, the professional student generates an evidence-based plan of assessment or intervention. This is linked to the Capstone Rotation (faculty approval).

    3

    OTD752

    Education Theory and Technology

    This course, through an examination of learning theories, provides the therapist with strategies to develop optimal learning experiences for their students, clients, caregivers, or employers. Coursework is applied directly in the professional student's educational and/or clinical setting. Students gain skills in current technological tools used in the teaching-learning environment.

    3

    OTD760

    Leadership and Professionalism

    This course examines the meaning of leadership from both a personal and organizational perspective. Students explore leadership theories and styles and the meaning of professionalism through narratives of leaders and related literature. Through group discussion of leadership and professional issues, students reflect and on their own leadership strengths, as well as strategies for applying this knowledge in their professional lives.

    3

    OTD761

    Proposal Development

    This course provides the experienced therapist with the skills and resources necessary for developing competitive proposals, including an IRB proposal, a proposal for a professional presentation, and a proposal for a professional publication. Students will explore and evaluate presentation and publication opportunities, participate in discussions to understand human subject protection, and refine their preliminary IRB proposal, created in OTD 751, to gain approval for their capstone project.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 2 of the following courses:
  • OTD741 Evidence-Based Practice
  • OTD751 Capstone Project Design
  • 1

    OTD766

    Methods of Evaluation

    Students learn to evaluate the effectiveness of their teaching and therapeutic interventions. Methods for survey and test construction are examined and practiced with consumers of our services: students, clients, and/or caregivers.

    3

    OTD770

    Capstone I: Design and Implementation

    The methods of evidence-based practice culminate in the professional student’s design and implementation of an intervention within their practice setting.

    3

    OTD771

    Capstone II: Evaluation and Presentation

    Students evaluate the efficacy of implemented programs and present their findings. Presentations are conducted on the Chatham University campus to the Master of Occupational Therapy Program’s faculty, students, and area clinicians. Additionally, the professional student writes a report for professional publication or grant application.

    3

    OTD772

    Capstone Implementation and Evaluation

    The methods of evidence-based practice culminate in the professional student's design and implementation of an intervention within their clinical setting. Although an independent study, students network with faculty mentors, administrators, and other professionals to successfully engage in the evidence-based occupational therapy capstone project. Professional students apply concepts from previous courses as they evaluate the efficacy of their individual implemented programs and present their findings. Presentations are conducted on the Chatham University campus to the Master of occupational therapy Program's faculty, students, and area practitioners.

    Pre-requisites

    Complete all 3 of the following courses:
  • OTD741 Evidence-Based Practice
  • OTD751 Capstone Project Design
  • OTD761 Proposal Development
  • 5

    OTD791

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 1

    OTD792

    Independent Study

    Independent Study

    Pre-requisites

    Complete the following course:
  • XXX123 Permission of Instructor
  • 2

    OTH601

    Foundations of Occupation & Occupational Therapy

    Students explore the role of occupation as the foundation of the profession and the relationship between occupation and health. Standards of practice, OT roles, history, current practice, and future trends are discussed. Methods of evaluation and documentation are introduced and practiced. Occupations throughout the lifespan and implications for intervention are examined.

    3

    OTH603

    Intro to OT Assessment & Intervention Skills

    Students learn to identify and assess the influence of client factors, performance skills and patterns, activity demands, and context on occupational performance from a physical disabilities perspective. Experiential learning opportunities enable students to gain proficiency in administering and interpreting assessments and practicing intervention strategies related to multiple areas of occupation.

    4

    OTH605

    Mental Health & Occupational Performance

    Students learn and apply the occupational therapy process for clients with mental health disorders. Occupational performance assessment, and intervention planning and implementation are emphasized. Societal and personal attitudes towards persons with mental health disorders will be explored. The social, economic, political, and demographic factors influencing mental health service provision will be addressed.

    4

    OTH610

    Advanced Topics in Occupational Therapy

    This course expands the OT student's understanding and application of treatment skills and clinical reasoning. The students practice these skills to enhance technical abilities and gain confidence in the selection and use of procedures. Objectives are achieved through visiting lecturers, case studies, class discussion, active participation, and dialogue.

    2

    OTH612

    Evidence-based Practice I

    This course introduces the role of evidence in occupational therapy clinical reasoning and practice. Students develop research consumer skills, including database search techniques, and critical analysis skills. Students are instructed within lecture and lab formats and with written and oral assignments that develop understanding of evidence based practice.

    2

    OTH622

    Occupational Performance in Children & Adolescents

    Students explore occupational development of children and adolescents, and the interrelationship between the child, occupation, and the environment on participation. Students learn about common pediatric diagnoses, practice models, and intervention sites, and apply this knowledge to occupational therapy evaluation and intervention. Influence of the family, environment, and socio-cultural factors is explored.

    4

    OTH623

    Occupational Performance in the Aging Population

    This course examines the normal aging process with emphasis on occupational performance, activity limitation, and participation restrictions of individuals from adulthood through the life span. Students review the assessment and treatment of clients, including prevention, remediation, and maintenance of wellness. Various practice areas for the adult and aging populations are discussed.

    4

    OTH624

    Biomechanics & Occupational Performance

    Students integrate knowledge of occupational performance with anatomy, neurology, and body factors to learn how impairments can lead to disability or role loss. Assessments and interventions are taught with a holistic approach to the person. Instruction is in both lecture and lab formats, and with written and oral assignments.

    4

    OTH626

    Occupational Therapy Models of Practice

    Theoretical practice models that guide occupational therapy evaluation and intervention are introduced and explored. Engagement in active learning opportunities enables students to describe and implement the occupation therapy process using selected models. Students analyze and relate pertinent occupations therapy literature and case studies to models of practice.

    2

    OTH628

    Evidence-Based Practice II

    This course develops and applies the students' evidence based practice skills. Emphasis is placed on writing focused clinical questions, systematic database searches and critical appraisals of research papers. Students work in small groups with a faculty advisor and individually to analyze and articulate evidence through written and oral assignments.

    3

    OTH632

    Environmental Interventions

    Students learn principles of assistive technology practice and the occupational therapist's role on the assistive technology team. Students explore and critique technology resources, assess environments, and apply information to evaluation and treatment. The impact of environmental interventions on the consumer's ability to engage in meaningful occupations is discussed and analyzed.

    3

    OTH633

    Global Health Perspectives: A Field Experience

    This course is intended to provide an opportunity for occupational therapy students to study and experience global health issues by participating in an international fieldwork experience. Not everything that is germane to understanding global health can be covered in a single elective course; this experience is intended to give students the opportunity to 1) understand the culture and contemporary health care issues of the visiting country 2) illustrate the role or potential role of occupational therapy in contributing to the health and wellbeing of the population and 3) reflect on their personal growth and on the sustainability of their service.

    2

    OTH635

    Pediatric Fieldwork I-A & Seminar

    This course provides students the opportunity to observe and engage with practitioners who provide occupational therapy services to infants, children and/or adolescents. This course uses guided assignments and small group discussions to bridge didactic classroom knowledge with the occupational therapy process and practices observed in pediatric settings.

    1

    OTH636

    Adult Fieldwork I-B & Seminar

    This course provides students the opportunity to observe and engage with practitioners who provide occupational therapy services in adult/geriatric settings. Guided assignments and small group discussions are used to bridge didactic classroom knowledge with the occupational therapy process and practices observed in adult/geriatric settings.

    1

    OTH637

    Functional Neuroscience

    This course applies content presented concurrently in BIO509 to the occupational therapy process. Students broaden their understanding of neurological disorders that may affect an individual's ability to perform routine occupational tasks. Students begin to translate the physiological changes incurred secondary to these neurological diagnoses to develop assessment and intervention plans.

    4

    OTH641

    Neurological Conditions & Occupational Performance

    This course emphasizes preparatory, purposeful, and occupation-based interventions as well as exploration of current innovations commonly used in occupational therapy practice. Students learn, apply, practice, compare and contrast