2019-2020 Course Catalog

Visual Arts: Studio Arts (BA)

The Visual Arts major is designed to prepare students to create, analyze, and critique visual art in a complex, rapidly changing global culture. The mission of the major is to empower students through the integration of technical applications and critical theories, to provide students with marketable skills, to assume creative, scholarly, and leadership roles in the visual arts field, and to promote an understanding of the role that the visual arts play in all facets of contemporary life. Concentrations are available in: Studio Arts and Art History.

Students must earn a C- or better in all major courses. Failure to earn this minimum grade will result in the need to repeat the course thereby possibly extending the student’s course of study beyond four years.

Learning Outcomes

B.A. in Visual Arts, Studio Concentration

College-Wide Goals & Objectives

This section explains how the Visual Arts, Studio Concentration Major meets the overarching objectives at Chatham University.

  1. Information Literacy

    1. Students must effectively locate and gather information for research and medium-related analysis through a variety of information media.
    2. Students must be able to properly evaluate the quality of the information and its sources.
    3. Students must utilize their knowledge gathered from various media sources to render well-communicated, designed and conceptualized projects and/or research papers in response to their contextual analysis.
  2. Critical Reading

    1. Students must evaluate art and theories related to critical visual studies through a combination of written and online texts, hand-outs, journal articles, art shows in galleries and museums, artist discussions and in-class lectures, conversations and demonstrations.
    2. Students must assess the quality of gathered and presented information as well as its sources.
  3. Analytical Thinking

    1. Students must critically investigate and respond to the work of other artists, and theorists as well as the work of their peers during critique sessions.
    2. Students must look for multidisciplinary relationships between art, studio practice and other fields of research, examining the role of the artist as well as art works within a broader social context.
    3. Students must exhibit a critical understanding of related technical concerns, representational issues, aesthetic practices, ideas and concepts through original projects and/or papers.
  4. Problem Solving

    1. Students must transform critical and analytical research into well-conceptualized projects and informed responses.
    2. Students must be able to move from concept to project actualization.
    3. Students must have a strong understanding of technique in order to properly troubleshoot and solve conceptual and creative issues related to a project.
  5. Public Written Communication

    1. Students must communicate clearly by writing research or response papers of various lengths, which support coursework requirements.
    2. Students must communicate their conceptual and creative concepts clearly in written project statements.
    3. Students must formulate a point of view and be able to defend it within the written format.
  6. Public Oral Communication

    1. Students must communicate ideas clearly in oral presentations.
    2. Students must actively participate in classroom discussions and group critique sessions.
    3. Students must formulate a point of view and be able to defend it orally.

Program-Specific Goals & Objectives

This section explains the discipline-specific goals and objectives of Visual Arts, Studio Concentration major.

  1. Media Literacy, Analysis and Context

    1. Students must have a historical understanding of the medium they are using and the ideas they are pursuing in their creative work.
    2. Students must be aware of major theories influencing the art field.
    3. Students must develop original and well-informed responses to theoretical and critical analysis.
    4. Students must look for interdisciplinary relationships between art, art history, and other fields of research.
  2. Creative Processes

    1. Students must develop and transform original concepts into well-conceptualized projects – demonstrating a competency in project development.
    2. Students must choose appropriate medium for the development of their project and/or idea through models, sketches, proposals, and aesthetic choices.
    3. Students must communicate their creative expression through project presentation at various stages of development.
  3. Technical Fundamentals

    1. Students must have knowledge of the medium they are utilizing for their projects.
    2. Students must create original projects that draw on their knowledge of the medium in order to thoroughly investigate relationships between concept development and media used.
    3. Students must properly troubleshoot and solve medium-related problems.
  4. Professional Practice

    1. Students must develop projects with an understanding of a diversified audience.
    2. Students must properly document their projects, choosing appropriate forms of media
    3. Students must have an understanding of relevant journals, festivals, firms, etc. for later distribution or field contribution.
    4. Students must develop field-appropriate professional portfolios and be able to communicate their projects clearly.
    5. Students must develop attitudes of professional responsibility and accountability.
    6. Students must develop professional discipline (time-management, organizational skills).

Curriculum

+Major Requirements

ART103 Intro to Visual Culture

Visual Culture can be understood as the practice of scrutinizing visual items in both elite and popular culture; of determining how and what they mean to a variety of audiences; and of examining how those meanings might slip, change, or be changed according to both context and audience. Students examine a broad range of visual materials - from paintings to films - through the term of study.

3
ART117 Drawing I

Through various drawing media, this studio course explores the basic principles of creating a work of visual art, including figure studies from the model, studies from nature, and techniques of composition. Additional Fee(s): Applied art fee.

3
ART132 History of World Art II: 1400 to Present

This introductory survey focuses on Western art from the Renaissance to today and the art of selected non-Western cultures (including Japan, Africa, and Islamic countries) after 1400. It concentrates on the stylistic, technical, and expressive evolution of painting, architecture, and sculpture within specific historical contexts, yet also explores the cross-influences and interaction of non-Western and Western art as defining characteristics of the modern world.

3
ART208 Introduction to Art Museum Studies

This course introduces students to the themes and issues addressed in the Art Museum Studies program, including an overview of the history and function of art museums, their role in society, the interpretation of objects for museum audiences, and other issues central to the museum profession such as censorship and repatriation.

3
ART214 Design Studio

This course is an introduction to the visual grammar of dynamic composition and form. In this studio course the student will study design with an emphasis on gaining an understanding of organizing principles that contribute to visual engaging and visual arrangements.

3
ART254 Modern Art, 1900 to the Present

In this course the student will be introduced to the major movements in European and American art since 1900. The first half will focus on 1900 to 1950 and the concept of modernism, who and what shaped it, and the shifting definitions of the artist. The second half will focus on recent trends in world art, focusing on new media and movements, including installation art, earth art, video art, postmodernism, and the new theoretical and conceptual approaches to art and art history.

3
ART313 Special Topics

Special Topics

3
INTART303 Internship - Art

Internship - Art

3
ART490 Integrative Capstone

The integrative capstone, undertaken by the student during the senior year, is an extended project that helps the student complete their transition from an undergraduate student to a world-ready professional. The study usually centers on the student's major and may be conducted, at least in part, in the context of a group experience. Such programs are crafted to meet the unique needs of each major, and could include, for example, fieldwork, theater production, creative work in the arts, independent research, or independent readings. The integrative capstone in an interdisciplinary major must have the approval of both academic programs.

3
Note: For digital documentation and portfolio work students must provide their own portable hard drive. Please see faculty member for specifications.

+Studio Arts Concentration

Six courses:

ART111 Ceramics I

This studio course provides students with an introduction to ceramic processes and materials. Instruction in beginning wheel-throwing methods augments competency in basic construction and surface application techniques. Projects focus on development of form and surface in ceramics, as well as exposure to historical and contemporary issues specific to the medium. Additional Fee(s): Applied art fee.

3
ART127 Printmaking I

This course is an introduction to the techniques and aesthetics of graphic media, including dry point, engraving, mezzotint, etching, and aquatint. Additional Fee(s): Applied art fee.

3
ART _05 or ART _27: One Advanced Studio in Ceramics or Sculpture (3)
ART _11 or ART _27 or ART _17: One Advanced Studio in Painting, Printmaking, or Drawing (3)

+Studio Arts Minor

Five courses:

ART103 Intro to Visual Culture

Visual Culture can be understood as the practice of scrutinizing visual items in both elite and popular culture; of determining how and what they mean to a variety of audiences; and of examining how those meanings might slip, change, or be changed according to both context and audience. Students examine a broad range of visual materials - from paintings to films - through the term of study.

3
ART254 Modern Art, 1900 to the Present

In this course the student will be introduced to the major movements in European and American art since 1900. The first half will focus on 1900 to 1950 and the concept of modernism, who and what shaped it, and the shifting definitions of the artist. The second half will focus on recent trends in world art, focusing on new media and movements, including installation art, earth art, video art, postmodernism, and the new theoretical and conceptual approaches to art and art history.

3
ART214 Design Studio

This course is an introduction to the visual grammar of dynamic composition and form. In this studio course the student will study design with an emphasis on gaining an understanding of organizing principles that contribute to visual engaging and visual arrangements.

3
ART117 Drawing I

Through various drawing media, this studio course explores the basic principles of creating a work of visual art, including figure studies from the model, studies from nature, and techniques of composition. Additional Fee(s): Applied art fee.

3
One Studio art class

Contact

Prajna Parasher

Department Chair

ppp816@chatham.edu

(412) 365 - 1182