2021-2022 Course Catalog

Neuroscience

Neuroscience is an interdisciplinary field that builds on the foundations of natural and physical sciences, as well as psychology, to examine structures and functions of the nervous system at molecular, cellular, organismal, and social levels. The major is designed for students interested in careers in research, clinical sciences, or medicine.

Learning Outcomes

Program Goals:

  1. To provide students with the knowledge and skills to consider, analyze, and examine the nervous system at molecular, cellular, organismal, and social scales.
  2. To develop graduates who can engage independently in scientific inquiry in order to conceive of, analyze, and interpret research questions, methods, and results from themselves or others.
  3. To develop graduates skilled in collaborative teamwork who have a broad base of knowledge in the natural and social sciences who can succeed within the interdisciplinary framework of neuroscience.
  4. To provide students with the requisite background in biology and investigative skills required to engage in scientific discourse that can address both long-standing and new challenges in the natural sciences, psychology, and neuroscience.

Program Outcomes

At the completion of the program, the graduate will be able to

  1. Demonstrate a broad base of knowledge within the natural sciences and psychology, reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of the field of neuroscience.
  2. Appropriately and effectively apply scientific methods to solve real-world biological problems, laboratory-based research skill sets.
  3. Understand the connections between structure and function at molecular, cellular, organismal, and social levels; understand and explain mechanisms whereby changes at one scale induce changes at all levels.
  4. Critically evaluate, analyze, and implement the scientific method as used in published and original research.
  5. Effectively communicate scientific information (both ideas and numerical data) to specialist and non-specialist audiences through writing and oral presentations. 

Curriculum

+Major Requirements

26 courses (lecture & lab) (53 credits)

BIO143 The Cell

This course is designed to provide a broad overview of current biological concepts, including cell structure, function, division, and basic genetics. Biologically important molecules also are presented. This course serves as the foundation for all upper-level biology courses. Three hours of class

3
BIO143L Lab: The Cell

Experiments to complement the material presented in BIO143. Two hours of laboratory per week. Corequisite or Prerequisite: BIO143. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fee.

1
BIO144 The Organism

This course provides a general survey of animals and plants at the organismic level, with emphasis on their evolution and various physiological processes such as respiration, circulation, digestion, and reproduction. This course serves as the foundation for all upper-level biology courses. Three hours of class.

3
BIO144L Lab: The Organism

Experiments to complement the material presented in BIO144. Two hours of laboratory per week. Corequisite: BIO144. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fees.

1
BIO209 Basic Neuroscience

This course is designed for wide appeal. It is an introduction to structure and function of the brain and spinal cord, and how nerves function and communicate. The basics of movement, sensation, language, emotion, and consciousness are discussed. Emphasis is placed on contrasting normal function with altered function in diseases. Three hours lecture per week.

3
BIO209LW Basic Neuroscience Lab

Experiments and skills to compliment the material presented in BIO209. The lab course focuses on experimental procedures, scientific analysis and scientific writing. Three hours of laboratory per week. Laboratory Fee. Corequisite: BIO 209.

2
BIO231W Cell and Molecular Biology

A lecture course covering the organelles and activities of cells. Topics include the structure of proteins and other biomolecules, bioenergetics and enzymes, membranes, the mitochondrion, the chloroplast, the endo-membrane system, the cytoskeleton, and the nucleus and cellular reproduction.

3
BIO319 Experimental Neuroscience

With an emphasis on neuropathology, the course builds on the foundations of neuroscience to explore advanced topics in sensation, motor control. emotion, and cognition. Classical and modern methods for investigating the structure and function of the nervous system will be examined through lectures, discussions, and student projects.

3
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BIO408 Developmental Biology

A study of the embryonic and post-embryonic development of animals, with special emphasis on humans. The morphogenesis, growth and mechanisms of differentiation are stressed. Other topics include cancer, regeneration, cloning, hormones as mediators of development, and developmental genetics.

3
OR
BIO417 Genetics

This study of the modern concepts of the gene stresses theory and experimental evidence relating to the structure of the gene, heritability of characteristics, and the behavior of genes in populations. Three hours of lecture per week.

3
OR
BIO438 Biochemistry I

This course covers the structure and functions of proteins, polynucleic acids, and biological membranes. Enzymes and kinetics are taught. Metabolic pathways, with emphasis on the thermodynamics of the equilibria and the storage and usage of energy, are covered.

3
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BIO490 Integrative Capstone

The integrative capstone, undertaken by the student during the senior year, is an extended project that helps the student complete their transition from an undergraduate student to a world-ready professional. The study usually centers on the student's major and may be conducted, at least in part, in the context of a group experience. Such programs are crafted to meet the unique needs of each major, and could include, for example, fieldwork, theater production, creative work in the arts, independent research, or independent readings. The integrative capstone in an interdisciplinary major must have the approval of both academic programs.

3
CHM107 Chemistry I

This class begins with a study of atomic structure, then expands to cover chemical naming, patterns of reactivity, thermochemistry, the interaction of light and matter, atomic orbitals, ionic and covalent bonding, and molecular shapes. This class concludes with an introduction to organic chemistry and biochemistry. Three hours of lecture per week. Co-requisite: CHM 109

3
CHM108 Chemistry II

The second semester of general chemistry continues exploring the structure, properties, and bonding of atoms and molecules, with emphasis on the physical characteristics of gases, liquids, solids and solutions, chemical equilibria, thermodynamics, and kinetics. Three hours of lecture per week.

3
CHM109L Chemistry I Laboratory

Introduction to the basic experimental procedures and laboratory techniques in chemistry. Experiments are correlated with the lectures in Chemistry 105 and Chemistry 107. Three hours of laboratory per week. Corequisite: CHM 105 or 107. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fee.

1
CHM110L Chemistry II Laboratory

Continued introduction to the basic experimental procedures and laboratory techniques in chemistry. Experiments are correlated with lectures in Chemistry 108. Three hours of laboratory per week. Corequisite: CHM 108. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fee.

1
CHM205 Organic Chemistry I

Development of the structural theory of organic compounds. Relationship of structure to reactivity, stereochemistry, types of organic reactive intermediates, and the chemistry of alkanes, alkenes, and aromatic compounds are covered. Three hours of lecture per week. Co-requisite: CHM 215.

3
CHM215L Elementary Organic Laboratory

Basic manipulative skills, including introduction to several chromatographic techniques, are followed by chemistry of alkenes and aromatic compounds. Four hours of laboratory per week. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fee.

2
IND350W Scientific Research Methods

This course serves as an introduction to research literature and research methodology in the sciences. Topics include professional writing, experimental design, presentation techniques, and professional and research ethics. Credit is not given for both IND350W and EXS301W.

2
INTBIO303 Internship - Biology

Internship - Biology

3
MTH110 Elementary Statistics

Topics include statistical measures and distributions, decision making under uncertainty, application of probability to statistical inference, linear correlation, introduction to nonparametric statistical methods, and application to problems drawn from the natural and social sciences. Three hours of class per week. Three hours of class per week.

3
MTH151 Calculus I

This is the first course in the calculus sequence. Topics include differential and integral calculus for algebraic and trigonometric functions with applications. Four hours of class per week.

4
PSY101 General Psychology

An introduction to the scientific study of behavior with an emphasis on the origins of behavior, learning, social influences, physiological factors, individual differences, personality, and adjustment and maladjustment.

3
PSY307 Cognitive Psychology

A survey of theories and research concerned with human cognitive processes. Topics include attention, memory, problem solving, and concept formation.

3
PSY341 Psychobiology

An examination of the biological correlates of behavior. Emphasis is placed on the central nervous system and its structure, organization, and function. Specific topics considered are sleep, learning, memory, sexual behavior, motivation, and complex processes such as thought and language.

3

+Electives

3 (1 BIO, 2 PSY)

BIO408 Developmental Biology

A study of the embryonic and post-embryonic development of animals, with special emphasis on humans. The morphogenesis, growth and mechanisms of differentiation are stressed. Other topics include cancer, regeneration, cloning, hormones as mediators of development, and developmental genetics.

3
BIO417 Genetics

This study of the modern concepts of the gene stresses theory and experimental evidence relating to the structure of the gene, heritability of characteristics, and the behavior of genes in populations. Three hours of lecture per week.

3
BIO438 Biochemistry I

This course covers the structure and functions of proteins, polynucleic acids, and biological membranes. Enzymes and kinetics are taught. Metabolic pathways, with emphasis on the thermodynamics of the equilibria and the storage and usage of energy, are covered.

3
PSY230 Animal Behavior

A general introduction to the study of animal behavior from evolutionary and sociobiological perspectives. Emphasis is on social behaviors and interactions.

3
PSY326 Psychology of Learning

An overview of the principles and research associated with modern learning theory. Topics include classical conditioning, operant learning, reinforcement theory, and stimulus control of behavior.

3
PSY331 Social Psychology

An examination of human social behavior with an emphasis on social influences that people have upon the beliefs or behaviors of others. The course covers methods of inquiry as well as the scientific study of how we think about, influence, and relate to one another. Representative topics include conformity, persuasion, social cognition, prejudice, aggression, and interpersonal relationships.

3
PSY333 Abnormal Behavior

A study of definitions of normality and abnormality, functional and organic syndromes, theories of causation, and procedures for the diagnosis and modification of disturbed behavior.

3
PSY340 Psychopharmacology

The influence of drugs on behavior and psychological state. Topics include neuron morphology, neurochemistry, principles of pharmacology, and the action and effects of psychotropic drugs.

3
PSY351 Childhood and Adolescence

A general introduction to theories and methods of developmental psychology. The course covers patterns and possible mechanisms of behavioral development from conception through adolescence. Audio- and videotapes of infants, children, and their families supplement lectures, discussions, and written exercises. The life-span perspective is continued in PSY 352.

3
PSY352 Adult Development

The periods of adolescence and adulthood are examined through current theories of development. A life cycle perspective is adopted to study physical, cognitive and social/emotional development. Questions of qualitative changes, continuity/discontinuity stages, individual differences and the impact of biological, environmental and cultural factors throughout adulthood are addressed. This course is designed to follow PSY 351, but may be taken as a stand-alone course.

3

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